More information about the Russian Nerpa submarine and its accident

More information about the Russian Nerpa submarine and its accident http://www.bellona.org/articles/articles_2009/nerpa_sea_trials Part of: Pacific Fleet accidents and incidents The Nerpa Akula class sub pictured here at sea trials before its lethal accident in November. Bellona Archive Related news Russian and Indian media report accident sub was to go to Indian navy Russia starts sea trials […]
More information about the Russian Nerpa submarine and its accident http://www.bellona.org/articles/articles_2009/nerpa_sea_trials
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The Nerpa Akula class sub pictured here at sea trials before its lethal accident in November.
Bellona Archive
The Russian Navy has successfully tested an Akula class nuclear attack submarine nine months after 20 sailors were killed and 21 more hospitalsed when the fire suppression system badly failed aboard the same submarine during trials in December, the sub’s builder and Russia media have reported. Charles Digges, 29/07-2009 The submarine accident, the worst to hit the Russian navy since 118 sailors died in 2000 when the Kursk nuclear submarine sunk in the Barents Sea, exposed the gap between the Kremlin’s ambitions and its military capabilities, giving the Navy yet another black eye. A fresh sea trial of the Soviet-designed Nerpa submarine began on July 10th in the Sea of Japan and was completed successfully, RIA quoted a source at the Amur shipyard, where the submarine was built, as saying. “The first stage of the test was completed successfully,” the source was quoted by the state-run RIA Novosti Russian news wire as saying. “The craft is in base (…) to prepare for the second stage of the test,” he said. He did not comment on when the submarine would be fully ready. Another, higher ranking official at the Amur shipyard declined to comment on the reported test when contacted by Bellona Web. The navy similarly would not officially comment on the recent Nerpa sea trials. The initial accident on the Nerpa last November was chalked up by Bellona’s Alexander Nikitin, a former sub captain in the Russian navy, to the sheer number of people aboard the submarine during it’s original sea trial. The crew of a standard Akula class submarine numbers 73, and three times as many were aboard during the accident.

This article from Reuters for readers interested in defense, submarines and underwater acoustics.

I think  this article from Reuters of interest to our blog readers interested in defense, submarines and underwater acoustics. http://www.reuters.com/article/idUSTRE5740DV20090805 WASHINGTON (Reuters) – Two nuclear-powered Russian attack submarines have been patrolling off the eastern seaboard of the United States in the first mission of its kind so close to shore in nearly a decade, U.S. […]
I think  this article from Reuters of interest to our blog readers interested in defense, submarines and underwater acoustics. http://www.reuters.com/article/idUSTRE5740DV20090805 WASHINGTON (Reuters) – Two nuclear-powered Russian attack submarines have been patrolling off the eastern seaboard of the United States in the first mission of its kind so close to shore in nearly a decade, U.S. officials said on Wednesday. CUBA PORT CALL One of the Russian submarines remained in international waters on Tuesday a couple hundred miles (km) off the coast of the United States, officials said. The second sub made a port call in Cuba in recent days, the New York Times reported, citing Defense Department officials who spoke on condition of anonymity. During the Cold War, the United States and Russia regularly sent submarines on secret missions near each other’s coasts. “It is the first time in roughly a decade that we’ve seen this kind of behavior,” Morrell said. Russia conducted a successful sea trial of the Nerpa last month in the Sea of Japan, according to the RIA news agency. During testing of the submarine in November, 20 people died and 21 were hospitalized when the fire extinguishing system was turned on in error, releasing Freon gas that asphyxiated the victims. The accident, the worst to hit the Russian navy since 118 sailors died in 2000 when the Kursk nuclear submarine sank in the Barents Sea, exposed the gap between the Kremlin’s ambitions and its military capabilities.

AUVs Cannot Fly Through Red Tape.

This was forwarded by Mark Lewellan,  ATI’s AUS instructor. It shows the cost-savings of using a small AUV to take accident overview photos. However, in general, the red tape makes this difficult to do in both the US and Canada.   It looks like a bug equipped with a camera, but the small Ontario Provincial […]
This was forwarded by Mark Lewellan,  ATI’s AUS instructor. It shows the cost-savings of using a small AUV to take accident overview photos. However, in general, the red tape makes this difficult to do in both the US and Canada.   OPP Identification Constable Marc Sharpe operates an unmanned aerial vehicle used at crime scenes It looks like a bug equipped with a camera, but the small Ontario Provincial Police unmanned aircraft is making history as one of the first aerial drones being regularly used in North America by law enforcement officials. The battery-powered craft, which can stay airborne for about 15 minutes at a time, has been used at homicides and other incidents in northwestern Ontario to take aerial photos for use in court. It has helped reduce costs, too, as the provincial police would have otherwise brought in a helicopter or rented an aircraft. “We’ve saved over $30,000 the 11 times we used it,” says Const. Marc Sharpe, who operates the mini-helicopter. Aerial drones are usually associated with the military on overseas missions such as in Afghanistan and Iraq. But the remote-controlled aircraft are also starting to be used by police and firefighters in Europe and by various companies in Australia. Read more: http://www.nationalpost.com/news/story.html?id=2226289#ixzz0XWTiVWS6

GEO Satellite question

Freddy posed the following question to Dr. Robert A. Nelson: Dear Dr. Nelson: I understand that GEO satellites are 2 degree appart in its orbital position. How is possible that  some satellites ( Telstar 11N and NSS 10 located at 37.5W; Astra 2C and 1D at 31.5 E) occupied the same orbital position ?. Could […]
Freddy posed the following question to Dr. Robert A. Nelson: Dear Dr. Nelson: I understand that GEO satellites are 2 degree appart in its orbital position. How is possible that  some satellites ( Telstar 11N and NSS 10 located at 37.5W; Astra 2C and 1D at 31.5 E) occupied the same orbital position ?. Could you please, help me to understand this ?. Thank you Dr. Nelson. Dr. Nelson responded as follows: The two-degree spacing requirement applies to satellites that use the same frequencies at C-band or Ku-band.  Interference is avoided through the use of highly directional Earth Station antennas, although there is inevitably some adjacent satellite interference, with a C/I typically around 22 dB. Satellites that share the same orbital slot use different frequency bands and sometimes also different polarizations.  For example, at 101 degrees WL, there are several satellites, including an SES Americom C/Ku-band satellite, an MSAT L-band satellite, and three or four DirectTV satellites that use a special portion of Ku-band for DBS and also use different polarizations. These satellites are separated by only about 0.02 degrees, or about 15 kilometers.  Very exact stationkeeping must be maintained. Dr. Nelson’s Satellite Communication Systems Engieering course is next scheduled December 8-10, 2009 in Beltsville, MD.

ATI Addresses 60 Minutes Special on Cyber Warfare

Last night 60 Minutes on CBS reported on the very real and escalating threat of cyber warfare attacks. Interviews included top experts in national security, Mike McConnell, former vice admiral in the U.S. Navy and former Director of the National Security Agency, as well as Jim Lewis, Director at the Center for Strategic and International […]
Last night 60 Minutes on CBS reported on the very real and escalating threat of cyber warfare attacks. Interviews included top experts in national security, Mike McConnell, former vice admiral in the U.S. Navy and former Director of the National Security Agency, as well as Jim Lewis, Director at the Center for Strategic and International Studies, and Sandia’s James Gossler, a leading authority on cyber warfare strategies. They each emphasized the United States vulnerability to cyber warfare attacks, revealing serious breaches in both the government and private sector, affecting financial institutions, energy and transportation infrastructures and national security computers.

Watch the 60 minutes video now. ATI’s new course, Theory and Fundamentals of Cyber Warfare is offered January 19-20 in Beltsville, MD. Seats are going quickly.

Register today to reserve your seat.

The Applied Technology Institute (ATI) announces a new two-day professional development short course, Theory and Fundamentals of Cyber Warfare, offered to the public on Jan 19-20, 2010 in Beltsville, Maryland. The course is offered in response to the growing need for businesses and military facilities to quickly gain an understanding of cyber threats and institute cyber security defenses. It is targeted especially to DoD analysts, specialists and engineers in security related facilities in the Washington, DC, Virginia and Maryland metro area, which has the largest concentration of DoD national security related facilities in the United States. Those facilities, along with the research and development contractors they work with, are building their resources to tackle the growing need for cyber security experts.

Cyber Warfare is all over news headlines. World leaders, including the United States, Russia, South Korea and Great Britain, are scrambling to organize against the rapidly increasing varieties of threats such as spyware and malware, spoofing, phishing and botnets that are having devastating effects around the world. Digital intelligence experts have labeled these escalating cyber threats as a “Global Cyber Cold War”.

The instructor for ATI’s new Theory and Fundamentals of Cyber Warfare course is Albert Kinney, who brings more than 20 years of experience in research and operational cyberspace mission areas including the initial development and first operational employment of the Naval Cyber Attack Team. Kinney says, “ I designed the course to focus on providing a top-down view of both the challenges and opportunities encountered in this new warfare domain. Attendees will gain insight to emerging requirements and trends affecting the implementation of cyber warfare systems, policy, and operations that will inform your strategy and focus your efforts in cyberspace.”

Maryland Governor, Martin O’Malley, was recently interviewed on 103.5 FM WTOP radio identifying Maryland as the next, “silicon valley” of cyber security. “Cyberspace has emerged as a mainstream warfare domain on par with air, land, sea, and space domains. This advancement to a bona fide battle space arises from the de facto behaviors of entities ranging from international superpowers to improvised non-state organizations. As a result, government and military organizations are developing new doctrines, establishing domain-focused operational hierarchies, and acquiring new systems capabilities to maintain cyberspace as a viable resource serving the national interest,” Kinney explains.

The topic of cyber security first gained momentum when President Obama announced in May that his administration will pursue a plan to secure America’s digital infrastructure and that, “Protecting this infrastructure will be a national security priority.” The President’s plan will involve nearly all sectors of local and national government and military.

Prospective attendees can view the full Theory and Fundamentals of Cyber Warfare course description by clicking on: http://www.aticourses.com/theory_fundamentals_cyber_warfare.html The Applied Technology Institute (ATI) specializes in professional development seminars in the technical areas of space, communications, defense, sonar, radar, and signal processing. For over twenty-five years, ATI has presented leading-edge technical training to defense and NASA facilities, as well as DoD and aerospace contractors. ATI courses provide a clear understanding of the fundamental principles and a working knowledge of current technology and applications. ATI has the unique capability to schedule and deliver courses in a matter of weeks. They offer customized on-site training at your facility anywhere in the United States, as well as internationally and over 200 annual public courses in dozens of locations. World-class design experts lead courses. To register or for an on-site quote, call (888) 501-2100, or visit them on the web at www.ATIcourses.com

Have you considered the low cost and high flexibility of unmanned aerial vehicles?

      Anchor Reliance Group (ARG) LLC is a new consulting and program management firm specializing in projects that utilize unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) for technology development and practical flight applications.   ARG focuses on three primary areas: (a) identifying organizations which would benefit from the flexibility and low cost of unmanned aerial vehicles […]

 

 

 

Anchor Reliance Group (ARG) LLC is a new consulting and program management firm specializing in projects that utilize unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) for technology development and practical flight applications.

 

ARG focuses on three primary areas:

(a) identifying organizations which would benefit from the flexibility and low cost of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs),

(b) helping organizations develop and execute flight projects which accomplish their business goals, and

(c) demonstrating cutting edge technologies via proof-of-concept flights.

 

Unmanned aircraft systems describe the newest and fastest growing segment of the aerospace industry worldwide today.  While it’s true that most existing applications are for military purposes, the potential for civilian and commercial applications is virtually unlimited.  The majority of tasks employing piloted aircraft can be accomplished by UAVs, and often with greater flexibility, less cost, less risk, and a smaller carbon-emission footprint.

 

ARG’s business model is built on the premise that every technology-based organization, whether military, civil, or commercial, can find a niche within the unmanned systems sector.  By reaching beyond convention, ARG enables organizations to realize their objectives through the application of UAS.  Some examples include:

 

  1. Technology firms which develop new airborne or space-based instruments typically hire manned aircraft to flight-test their products.  With proper planning, ARG can fly these instruments on an unmanned aircraft, achieving the same testing at lower hourly cost and environmental impact.

 

  1. Other organizations may want to collect only video or data from an airborne platform for environmental studies, crop management, pipeline inspections, and other purposes.  UAVs are well-suited for these applications, and ARG will work with these organizations to design and fly the project that will deliver the required data.

 

  1. New unmanned aircraft platforms and flight systems require extensive testing before market.  ARG will coordinate the range and restricted air space to test and prove these products.

 

  1. With ARG’s help, emergency response agencies such as police and fire departments can benefit from unmanned aircraft to aid with emergency communications, search and rescue, hazards detection, and cargo lift and delivery.

 

Based in Somerset County near the Maryland-Virginia border, between the Chesapeake Bay and Atlantic Ocean with access to both air and maritime environments, ARG is convenient to Washington DC, and the Hampton Roads and Greenbelt technology regions.  Nearby flight and test ranges such as Wallops Flight Facility, Fort Eustis, and Fort Pickett, and local military facilities all offer a diverse choice of terrains and resources for a variety of flight projects. 

 

Through its broad network of industry resources and talents, ARG will provide everything from basic consulting services to complete end-to-end program management, including finding the right flight vehicles, payloads, and sensors to fly your mission.  ARG provides engineering and technical support, software development, safety analysis and risk management, as well as range and air space coordination.  A typical project at ARG follows a basic five-step process:

 

Phase 1:  Conduct initial consultation to establish mission objectives and to determine how UAS fit the customer’s goals.

 

Phase 2:  Choose the best aircraft and sensors, and design the flight that will achieve mission success.

 

Phase 3:  Coordinate use of flight range and restricted airspace, or work with the FAA to apply for a Certificate of Authorization (COA) to fly in the National Air Space, if required.

 

Phase 4:  Execute the mission; gather and process the data.

 

Phase 5:  Deliver the final report.

 

To find out more about the services and capabilities at Anchor Reliance Group, visit ARGs web site at www.anchorreliancegroup.com or call (443) 783-6763.

Unmanned Aircraft Systems

Yesterday, instructor Mark Lewellen was explaining some of the background to UAVs:  from aerial attacks on Venice through Marilyn Monroe to sizes of UAVs and likely future uses. If prospective attendees knew they would enjoy the thought-provoking subject half as much as I did,  ATI would be running this course once a month.
Yesterday, instructor Mark Lewellen was explaining some of the background to UAVs:  from aerial attacks on Venice through Marilyn Monroe to sizes of UAVs and likely future uses. If prospective attendees knew they would enjoy the thought-provoking subject half as much as I did,  ATI would be running this course once a month.

Department of Defense FY 2010 Budget

After a three-month delay because of the change in administrations, DOD is submitting its FY 2010 budget request to Congress. http://www.defenselink.mil/comptroller/Budget2010.html
After a three-month delay because of the change in administrations, DOD is submitting its FY 2010 budget request to Congress. http://www.defenselink.mil/comptroller/Budget2010.html

Arleigh Burke Class DDG 108 Named for Wayne Meyer, a former ATI instructor

An  Arleigh Burke Class DDG 108 was named for Wayne Meyer, a former ATI instructor. Rear Adm. Wayne E. Meyer is also known as the father of AEGIS. After he retired from the Navy in 1985 he taught several professional development classes on Combat Systems Engineering for ATI based on his many years of systems […]

An  Arleigh Burke Class DDG 108 was named for Wayne Meyer, a former ATI instructor. Rear Adm. Wayne E. Meyer is also known as the father of AEGIS. After he retired from the Navy in 1985 he taught several professional development classes on Combat Systems Engineering for ATI based on his many years of systems engineering experience with the AEGIS combat System. Wayne E. Meyer passed away on Sept 1, 2009,  and did not get to see this ships’ commissioning, which bears his name, but his legend as ‘father of Aegis” is well known

DDG 108 Wayne E. Meyer

DDG-108 has been named in honor of Rear Adm. Wayne E. Meyer. DDG-108 Rear Adm. Wayne E. Meyer is a Flight IIA variant of the Arleigh Burke class guided missile destroyer and incorporates a helicopter hanger facility into the original design. The ship can each carry two SH-60B/R helicopters. Guided missile destroyers operate independently and in conjunction with carrier strike groups, surface action groups, expeditionary strike groups and replenishment groups. On August 22, 2008 the USS WAYNE E. MEYER (DDG 108) received its homeport letter and will homeport in San Diego, CA. The ship is scheduled to set sail from Bath late summer 2009. The location and date for the ship’s commissioning has yet to be determined, but it will most likely occur in the fall of 2009 [versus the originally planned January 2009]. Until DDG 108 is commissioned, its formal title is Pre-Commissioning Unit WAYNE E. MEYER (DDG 108). Once commissioned, the title will change to USS WAYNE E. MEYER (DDG 108). The Pre-Commissioning Unit administration support facility is located at 590 Washington Street in Bath, Maine. The term PCU, or simply “PRECOM Unit” or “Unit,” also refers to the PCU support facility that houses the offices for the crews of each PCU currently under construction in Bath. For the purposes of the entire Pre-Commissioning process, think of the “PRECOM Unit” or “PCU” as the actual ship in Bath. Click here for more info

Rear Admiral Wayne E. Meyer

As of mid-2008 Rear Admiral Meyer operated a consultancy with offices in Crystal City, Virginia. He chairs and serves on numerous Panels and Committees chartered by various DOD civil and military officials. He has served on the National Ballistic Missile Defense Advisory Committee for the past seven years, serving as its Chairman for the past three years. He also gives numerous speeches besides reviewing and editing articles, essays and books. Rear Admiral Wayne E. Meyer, retired in 1985 as the Deputy Commander for Weapons and Combat systems, Naval Sea Systems, Naval Sea Systems Command and Ordnance Officer of the Navy.

Applied Technology Introduces New Cyber Warfare Short Course

(Riva, MD; September 2009) The Applied Technology Institute (ATI) announces a new two-day professional development short course, Theory and Fundamentals of Cyber Warfare, offered to the public on Jan 19-20, 2010 in Beltsville, Maryland. The course is offered in response to the growing need for businesses and military facilities to quickly gain an understanding of […]
(Riva, MD; September 2009) The Applied Technology Institute (ATI) announces a new two-day professional development short course, Theory and Fundamentals of Cyber Warfare, offered to the public on Jan 19-20, 2010 in Beltsville, Maryland. The course is offered in response to the growing need for businesses and military facilities to quickly gain an understanding of cyber threats and institute cyber security defenses. It is targeted especially to DoD analysts, specialists and engineers in security related facilities in the Washington, DC, Virginia and Maryland metro area, which has the largest concentration of DoD national security related facilities in the United States. Those facilities, along with the research and development contractors they work with, are building their resources to tackle the growing need for cyber security experts.

Cyber Warfare is all over news headlines. World leaders, including the United States, Russia, South Korea and Great Britain, are scrambling to organize against the rapidly increasing varieties of threats such as spyware and malware, spoofing, phishing and botnets that are having devastating effects around the world. Digital intelligence experts have labeled these escalating cyber threats as a “Global Cyber Cold War”.

The instructor for ATI’s new Theory and Fundamentals of Cyber Warfare course is Albert Kinney, who brings more than 20 years of experience in research and operational cyberspace mission areas including the initial development and first operational employment of the Naval Cyber Attack Team. Kinney says, “ I designed the course to focus on providing a top-down view of both the challenges and opportunities encountered in this new warfare domain. Attendees will gain insight to emerging requirements and trends affecting the implementation of cyber warfare systems, policy, and operations that will inform your strategy and focus your efforts in cyberspace.”

Maryland Governor, Martin O’Malley, was recently interviewed on 103.5 FM WTOP radio identifying Maryland as the next, “silicon valley” of cyber security. “Cyberspace has emerged as a mainstream warfare domain on par with air, land, sea, and space domains. This advancement to a bona fide battle space arises from the de facto behaviors of entities ranging from international superpowers to improvised non-state organizations. As a result, government and military organizations are developing new doctrines, establishing domain-focused operational hierarchies, and acquiring new systems capabilities to maintain cyberspace as a viable resource serving the national interest,” Kinney explains.

The topic of cyber security first gained momentum when President Obama announced in May that his administration will pursue a plan to secure America’s digital infrastructure and that, “Protecting this infrastructure will be a national security priority.” The President’s plan will involve nearly all sectors of local and national government and military.

Prospective attendees can view the full Theory and Fundamentals of Cyber Warfare course description by clicking on: http://www.aticourses.com/theory_fundamentals_cyber_warfare.html

The Applied Technology Institute (ATI) specializes in professional development seminars in the technical areas of space, communications, defense, sonar, radar, and signal processing. For over twenty-five years, ATI has presented leading-edge technical training to defense and NASA facilities, as well as DoD and aerospace contractors. ATI courses provide a clear understanding of the fundamental principles and a working knowledge of current technology and applications. ATI has the unique capability to schedule and deliver courses in a matter of weeks. They offer customized on-site training at your facility anywhere in the United States, as well as internationally and over 200 annual public courses in dozens of locations. World-class design experts lead courses. To register or for an on-site quote, call (888) 501-2100, or visit them on the web at www.ATIcourses.com.