More information about the Russian Nerpa submarine and its accident

More information about the Russian Nerpa submarine and its accident http://www.bellona.org/articles/articles_2009/nerpa_sea_trials Part of: Pacific Fleet accidents and incidents The Nerpa Akula class sub pictured here at sea trials before its lethal accident in November. Bellona Archive Related news Russian and Indian media report accident sub was to go to Indian navy Russia starts sea trials […]
More information about the Russian Nerpa submarine and its accident http://www.bellona.org/articles/articles_2009/nerpa_sea_trials
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The Nerpa Akula class sub pictured here at sea trials before its lethal accident in November.
Bellona Archive
The Russian Navy has successfully tested an Akula class nuclear attack submarine nine months after 20 sailors were killed and 21 more hospitalsed when the fire suppression system badly failed aboard the same submarine during trials in December, the sub’s builder and Russia media have reported. Charles Digges, 29/07-2009 The submarine accident, the worst to hit the Russian navy since 118 sailors died in 2000 when the Kursk nuclear submarine sunk in the Barents Sea, exposed the gap between the Kremlin’s ambitions and its military capabilities, giving the Navy yet another black eye. A fresh sea trial of the Soviet-designed Nerpa submarine began on July 10th in the Sea of Japan and was completed successfully, RIA quoted a source at the Amur shipyard, where the submarine was built, as saying. “The first stage of the test was completed successfully,” the source was quoted by the state-run RIA Novosti Russian news wire as saying. “The craft is in base (…) to prepare for the second stage of the test,” he said. He did not comment on when the submarine would be fully ready. Another, higher ranking official at the Amur shipyard declined to comment on the reported test when contacted by Bellona Web. The navy similarly would not officially comment on the recent Nerpa sea trials. The initial accident on the Nerpa last November was chalked up by Bellona’s Alexander Nikitin, a former sub captain in the Russian navy, to the sheer number of people aboard the submarine during it’s original sea trial. The crew of a standard Akula class submarine numbers 73, and three times as many were aboard during the accident.

This article from Reuters for readers interested in defense, submarines and underwater acoustics.

I think  this article from Reuters of interest to our blog readers interested in defense, submarines and underwater acoustics. http://www.reuters.com/article/idUSTRE5740DV20090805 WASHINGTON (Reuters) – Two nuclear-powered Russian attack submarines have been patrolling off the eastern seaboard of the United States in the first mission of its kind so close to shore in nearly a decade, U.S. […]
I think  this article from Reuters of interest to our blog readers interested in defense, submarines and underwater acoustics. http://www.reuters.com/article/idUSTRE5740DV20090805 WASHINGTON (Reuters) – Two nuclear-powered Russian attack submarines have been patrolling off the eastern seaboard of the United States in the first mission of its kind so close to shore in nearly a decade, U.S. officials said on Wednesday. CUBA PORT CALL One of the Russian submarines remained in international waters on Tuesday a couple hundred miles (km) off the coast of the United States, officials said. The second sub made a port call in Cuba in recent days, the New York Times reported, citing Defense Department officials who spoke on condition of anonymity. During the Cold War, the United States and Russia regularly sent submarines on secret missions near each other’s coasts. “It is the first time in roughly a decade that we’ve seen this kind of behavior,” Morrell said. Russia conducted a successful sea trial of the Nerpa last month in the Sea of Japan, according to the RIA news agency. During testing of the submarine in November, 20 people died and 21 were hospitalized when the fire extinguishing system was turned on in error, releasing Freon gas that asphyxiated the victims. The accident, the worst to hit the Russian navy since 118 sailors died in 2000 when the Kursk nuclear submarine sank in the Barents Sea, exposed the gap between the Kremlin’s ambitions and its military capabilities.

AUVs Cannot Fly Through Red Tape.

This was forwarded by Mark Lewellan,  ATI’s AUS instructor. It shows the cost-savings of using a small AUV to take accident overview photos. However, in general, the red tape makes this difficult to do in both the US and Canada.   It looks like a bug equipped with a camera, but the small Ontario Provincial […]
This was forwarded by Mark Lewellan,  ATI’s AUS instructor. It shows the cost-savings of using a small AUV to take accident overview photos. However, in general, the red tape makes this difficult to do in both the US and Canada.   OPP Identification Constable Marc Sharpe operates an unmanned aerial vehicle used at crime scenes It looks like a bug equipped with a camera, but the small Ontario Provincial Police unmanned aircraft is making history as one of the first aerial drones being regularly used in North America by law enforcement officials. The battery-powered craft, which can stay airborne for about 15 minutes at a time, has been used at homicides and other incidents in northwestern Ontario to take aerial photos for use in court. It has helped reduce costs, too, as the provincial police would have otherwise brought in a helicopter or rented an aircraft. “We’ve saved over $30,000 the 11 times we used it,” says Const. Marc Sharpe, who operates the mini-helicopter. Aerial drones are usually associated with the military on overseas missions such as in Afghanistan and Iraq. But the remote-controlled aircraft are also starting to be used by police and firefighters in Europe and by various companies in Australia. Read more: http://www.nationalpost.com/news/story.html?id=2226289#ixzz0XWTiVWS6

GEO Satellite question

Freddy posed the following question to Dr. Robert A. Nelson: Dear Dr. Nelson: I understand that GEO satellites are 2 degree appart in its orbital position. How is possible that  some satellites ( Telstar 11N and NSS 10 located at 37.5W; Astra 2C and 1D at 31.5 E) occupied the same orbital position ?. Could […]
Freddy posed the following question to Dr. Robert A. Nelson: Dear Dr. Nelson: I understand that GEO satellites are 2 degree appart in its orbital position. How is possible that  some satellites ( Telstar 11N and NSS 10 located at 37.5W; Astra 2C and 1D at 31.5 E) occupied the same orbital position ?. Could you please, help me to understand this ?. Thank you Dr. Nelson. Dr. Nelson responded as follows: The two-degree spacing requirement applies to satellites that use the same frequencies at C-band or Ku-band.  Interference is avoided through the use of highly directional Earth Station antennas, although there is inevitably some adjacent satellite interference, with a C/I typically around 22 dB. Satellites that share the same orbital slot use different frequency bands and sometimes also different polarizations.  For example, at 101 degrees WL, there are several satellites, including an SES Americom C/Ku-band satellite, an MSAT L-band satellite, and three or four DirectTV satellites that use a special portion of Ku-band for DBS and also use different polarizations. These satellites are separated by only about 0.02 degrees, or about 15 kilometers.  Very exact stationkeeping must be maintained. Dr. Nelson’s Satellite Communication Systems Engieering course is next scheduled December 8-10, 2009 in Beltsville, MD.

ATI Addresses 60 Minutes Special on Cyber Warfare

Last night 60 Minutes on CBS reported on the very real and escalating threat of cyber warfare attacks. Interviews included top experts in national security, Mike McConnell, former vice admiral in the U.S. Navy and former Director of the National Security Agency, as well as Jim Lewis, Director at the Center for Strategic and International […]
Last night 60 Minutes on CBS reported on the very real and escalating threat of cyber warfare attacks. Interviews included top experts in national security, Mike McConnell, former vice admiral in the U.S. Navy and former Director of the National Security Agency, as well as Jim Lewis, Director at the Center for Strategic and International Studies, and Sandia’s James Gossler, a leading authority on cyber warfare strategies. They each emphasized the United States vulnerability to cyber warfare attacks, revealing serious breaches in both the government and private sector, affecting financial institutions, energy and transportation infrastructures and national security computers.

Watch the 60 minutes video now. ATI’s new course, Theory and Fundamentals of Cyber Warfare is offered January 19-20 in Beltsville, MD. Seats are going quickly.

Register today to reserve your seat.

The Applied Technology Institute (ATI) announces a new two-day professional development short course, Theory and Fundamentals of Cyber Warfare, offered to the public on Jan 19-20, 2010 in Beltsville, Maryland. The course is offered in response to the growing need for businesses and military facilities to quickly gain an understanding of cyber threats and institute cyber security defenses. It is targeted especially to DoD analysts, specialists and engineers in security related facilities in the Washington, DC, Virginia and Maryland metro area, which has the largest concentration of DoD national security related facilities in the United States. Those facilities, along with the research and development contractors they work with, are building their resources to tackle the growing need for cyber security experts.

Cyber Warfare is all over news headlines. World leaders, including the United States, Russia, South Korea and Great Britain, are scrambling to organize against the rapidly increasing varieties of threats such as spyware and malware, spoofing, phishing and botnets that are having devastating effects around the world. Digital intelligence experts have labeled these escalating cyber threats as a “Global Cyber Cold War”.

The instructor for ATI’s new Theory and Fundamentals of Cyber Warfare course is Albert Kinney, who brings more than 20 years of experience in research and operational cyberspace mission areas including the initial development and first operational employment of the Naval Cyber Attack Team. Kinney says, “ I designed the course to focus on providing a top-down view of both the challenges and opportunities encountered in this new warfare domain. Attendees will gain insight to emerging requirements and trends affecting the implementation of cyber warfare systems, policy, and operations that will inform your strategy and focus your efforts in cyberspace.”

Maryland Governor, Martin O’Malley, was recently interviewed on 103.5 FM WTOP radio identifying Maryland as the next, “silicon valley” of cyber security. “Cyberspace has emerged as a mainstream warfare domain on par with air, land, sea, and space domains. This advancement to a bona fide battle space arises from the de facto behaviors of entities ranging from international superpowers to improvised non-state organizations. As a result, government and military organizations are developing new doctrines, establishing domain-focused operational hierarchies, and acquiring new systems capabilities to maintain cyberspace as a viable resource serving the national interest,” Kinney explains.

The topic of cyber security first gained momentum when President Obama announced in May that his administration will pursue a plan to secure America’s digital infrastructure and that, “Protecting this infrastructure will be a national security priority.” The President’s plan will involve nearly all sectors of local and national government and military.

Prospective attendees can view the full Theory and Fundamentals of Cyber Warfare course description by clicking on: http://www.aticourses.com/theory_fundamentals_cyber_warfare.html The Applied Technology Institute (ATI) specializes in professional development seminars in the technical areas of space, communications, defense, sonar, radar, and signal processing. For over twenty-five years, ATI has presented leading-edge technical training to defense and NASA facilities, as well as DoD and aerospace contractors. ATI courses provide a clear understanding of the fundamental principles and a working knowledge of current technology and applications. ATI has the unique capability to schedule and deliver courses in a matter of weeks. They offer customized on-site training at your facility anywhere in the United States, as well as internationally and over 200 annual public courses in dozens of locations. World-class design experts lead courses. To register or for an on-site quote, call (888) 501-2100, or visit them on the web at www.ATIcourses.com

Have you considered the low cost and high flexibility of unmanned aerial vehicles?

      Anchor Reliance Group (ARG) LLC is a new consulting and program management firm specializing in projects that utilize unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) for technology development and practical flight applications.   ARG focuses on three primary areas: (a) identifying organizations which would benefit from the flexibility and low cost of unmanned aerial vehicles […]

 

 

 

Anchor Reliance Group (ARG) LLC is a new consulting and program management firm specializing in projects that utilize unmanned aircraft systems (UAS) for technology development and practical flight applications.

 

ARG focuses on three primary areas:

(a) identifying organizations which would benefit from the flexibility and low cost of unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs),

(b) helping organizations develop and execute flight projects which accomplish their business goals, and

(c) demonstrating cutting edge technologies via proof-of-concept flights.

 

Unmanned aircraft systems describe the newest and fastest growing segment of the aerospace industry worldwide today.  While it’s true that most existing applications are for military purposes, the potential for civilian and commercial applications is virtually unlimited.  The majority of tasks employing piloted aircraft can be accomplished by UAVs, and often with greater flexibility, less cost, less risk, and a smaller carbon-emission footprint.

 

ARG’s business model is built on the premise that every technology-based organization, whether military, civil, or commercial, can find a niche within the unmanned systems sector.  By reaching beyond convention, ARG enables organizations to realize their objectives through the application of UAS.  Some examples include:

 

  1. Technology firms which develop new airborne or space-based instruments typically hire manned aircraft to flight-test their products.  With proper planning, ARG can fly these instruments on an unmanned aircraft, achieving the same testing at lower hourly cost and environmental impact.

 

  1. Other organizations may want to collect only video or data from an airborne platform for environmental studies, crop management, pipeline inspections, and other purposes.  UAVs are well-suited for these applications, and ARG will work with these organizations to design and fly the project that will deliver the required data.

 

  1. New unmanned aircraft platforms and flight systems require extensive testing before market.  ARG will coordinate the range and restricted air space to test and prove these products.

 

  1. With ARG’s help, emergency response agencies such as police and fire departments can benefit from unmanned aircraft to aid with emergency communications, search and rescue, hazards detection, and cargo lift and delivery.

 

Based in Somerset County near the Maryland-Virginia border, between the Chesapeake Bay and Atlantic Ocean with access to both air and maritime environments, ARG is convenient to Washington DC, and the Hampton Roads and Greenbelt technology regions.  Nearby flight and test ranges such as Wallops Flight Facility, Fort Eustis, and Fort Pickett, and local military facilities all offer a diverse choice of terrains and resources for a variety of flight projects. 

 

Through its broad network of industry resources and talents, ARG will provide everything from basic consulting services to complete end-to-end program management, including finding the right flight vehicles, payloads, and sensors to fly your mission.  ARG provides engineering and technical support, software development, safety analysis and risk management, as well as range and air space coordination.  A typical project at ARG follows a basic five-step process:

 

Phase 1:  Conduct initial consultation to establish mission objectives and to determine how UAS fit the customer’s goals.

 

Phase 2:  Choose the best aircraft and sensors, and design the flight that will achieve mission success.

 

Phase 3:  Coordinate use of flight range and restricted airspace, or work with the FAA to apply for a Certificate of Authorization (COA) to fly in the National Air Space, if required.

 

Phase 4:  Execute the mission; gather and process the data.

 

Phase 5:  Deliver the final report.

 

To find out more about the services and capabilities at Anchor Reliance Group, visit ARGs web site at www.anchorreliancegroup.com or call (443) 783-6763.

Unmanned Aircraft Systems

Yesterday, instructor Mark Lewellen was explaining some of the background to UAVs:  from aerial attacks on Venice through Marilyn Monroe to sizes of UAVs and likely future uses. If prospective attendees knew they would enjoy the thought-provoking subject half as much as I did,  ATI would be running this course once a month.
Yesterday, instructor Mark Lewellen was explaining some of the background to UAVs:  from aerial attacks on Venice through Marilyn Monroe to sizes of UAVs and likely future uses. If prospective attendees knew they would enjoy the thought-provoking subject half as much as I did,  ATI would be running this course once a month.

Department of Defense FY 2010 Budget

After a three-month delay because of the change in administrations, DOD is submitting its FY 2010 budget request to Congress. http://www.defenselink.mil/comptroller/Budget2010.html
After a three-month delay because of the change in administrations, DOD is submitting its FY 2010 budget request to Congress. http://www.defenselink.mil/comptroller/Budget2010.html

Arleigh Burke Class DDG 108 Named for Wayne Meyer, a former ATI instructor

An  Arleigh Burke Class DDG 108 was named for Wayne Meyer, a former ATI instructor. Rear Adm. Wayne E. Meyer is also known as the father of AEGIS. After he retired from the Navy in 1985 he taught several professional development classes on Combat Systems Engineering for ATI based on his many years of systems […]

An  Arleigh Burke Class DDG 108 was named for Wayne Meyer, a former ATI instructor. Rear Adm. Wayne E. Meyer is also known as the father of AEGIS. After he retired from the Navy in 1985 he taught several professional development classes on Combat Systems Engineering for ATI based on his many years of systems engineering experience with the AEGIS combat System. Wayne E. Meyer passed away on Sept 1, 2009,  and did not get to see this ships’ commissioning, which bears his name, but his legend as ‘father of Aegis” is well known

DDG 108 Wayne E. Meyer

DDG-108 has been named in honor of Rear Adm. Wayne E. Meyer. DDG-108 Rear Adm. Wayne E. Meyer is a Flight IIA variant of the Arleigh Burke class guided missile destroyer and incorporates a helicopter hanger facility into the original design. The ship can each carry two SH-60B/R helicopters. Guided missile destroyers operate independently and in conjunction with carrier strike groups, surface action groups, expeditionary strike groups and replenishment groups. On August 22, 2008 the USS WAYNE E. MEYER (DDG 108) received its homeport letter and will homeport in San Diego, CA. The ship is scheduled to set sail from Bath late summer 2009. The location and date for the ship’s commissioning has yet to be determined, but it will most likely occur in the fall of 2009 [versus the originally planned January 2009]. Until DDG 108 is commissioned, its formal title is Pre-Commissioning Unit WAYNE E. MEYER (DDG 108). Once commissioned, the title will change to USS WAYNE E. MEYER (DDG 108). The Pre-Commissioning Unit administration support facility is located at 590 Washington Street in Bath, Maine. The term PCU, or simply “PRECOM Unit” or “Unit,” also refers to the PCU support facility that houses the offices for the crews of each PCU currently under construction in Bath. For the purposes of the entire Pre-Commissioning process, think of the “PRECOM Unit” or “PCU” as the actual ship in Bath. Click here for more info

Rear Admiral Wayne E. Meyer

As of mid-2008 Rear Admiral Meyer operated a consultancy with offices in Crystal City, Virginia. He chairs and serves on numerous Panels and Committees chartered by various DOD civil and military officials. He has served on the National Ballistic Missile Defense Advisory Committee for the past seven years, serving as its Chairman for the past three years. He also gives numerous speeches besides reviewing and editing articles, essays and books. Rear Admiral Wayne E. Meyer, retired in 1985 as the Deputy Commander for Weapons and Combat systems, Naval Sea Systems, Naval Sea Systems Command and Ordnance Officer of the Navy.

Applied Technology Introduces New Cyber Warfare Short Course

(Riva, MD; September 2009) The Applied Technology Institute (ATI) announces a new two-day professional development short course, Theory and Fundamentals of Cyber Warfare, offered to the public on Jan 19-20, 2010 in Beltsville, Maryland. The course is offered in response to the growing need for businesses and military facilities to quickly gain an understanding of […]
(Riva, MD; September 2009) The Applied Technology Institute (ATI) announces a new two-day professional development short course, Theory and Fundamentals of Cyber Warfare, offered to the public on Jan 19-20, 2010 in Beltsville, Maryland. The course is offered in response to the growing need for businesses and military facilities to quickly gain an understanding of cyber threats and institute cyber security defenses. It is targeted especially to DoD analysts, specialists and engineers in security related facilities in the Washington, DC, Virginia and Maryland metro area, which has the largest concentration of DoD national security related facilities in the United States. Those facilities, along with the research and development contractors they work with, are building their resources to tackle the growing need for cyber security experts.

Cyber Warfare is all over news headlines. World leaders, including the United States, Russia, South Korea and Great Britain, are scrambling to organize against the rapidly increasing varieties of threats such as spyware and malware, spoofing, phishing and botnets that are having devastating effects around the world. Digital intelligence experts have labeled these escalating cyber threats as a “Global Cyber Cold War”.

The instructor for ATI’s new Theory and Fundamentals of Cyber Warfare course is Albert Kinney, who brings more than 20 years of experience in research and operational cyberspace mission areas including the initial development and first operational employment of the Naval Cyber Attack Team. Kinney says, “ I designed the course to focus on providing a top-down view of both the challenges and opportunities encountered in this new warfare domain. Attendees will gain insight to emerging requirements and trends affecting the implementation of cyber warfare systems, policy, and operations that will inform your strategy and focus your efforts in cyberspace.”

Maryland Governor, Martin O’Malley, was recently interviewed on 103.5 FM WTOP radio identifying Maryland as the next, “silicon valley” of cyber security. “Cyberspace has emerged as a mainstream warfare domain on par with air, land, sea, and space domains. This advancement to a bona fide battle space arises from the de facto behaviors of entities ranging from international superpowers to improvised non-state organizations. As a result, government and military organizations are developing new doctrines, establishing domain-focused operational hierarchies, and acquiring new systems capabilities to maintain cyberspace as a viable resource serving the national interest,” Kinney explains.

The topic of cyber security first gained momentum when President Obama announced in May that his administration will pursue a plan to secure America’s digital infrastructure and that, “Protecting this infrastructure will be a national security priority.” The President’s plan will involve nearly all sectors of local and national government and military.

Prospective attendees can view the full Theory and Fundamentals of Cyber Warfare course description by clicking on: http://www.aticourses.com/theory_fundamentals_cyber_warfare.html

The Applied Technology Institute (ATI) specializes in professional development seminars in the technical areas of space, communications, defense, sonar, radar, and signal processing. For over twenty-five years, ATI has presented leading-edge technical training to defense and NASA facilities, as well as DoD and aerospace contractors. ATI courses provide a clear understanding of the fundamental principles and a working knowledge of current technology and applications. ATI has the unique capability to schedule and deliver courses in a matter of weeks. They offer customized on-site training at your facility anywhere in the United States, as well as internationally and over 200 annual public courses in dozens of locations. World-class design experts lead courses. To register or for an on-site quote, call (888) 501-2100, or visit them on the web at www.ATIcourses.com.

New ATI Course Demystifies Satellite Service Requirements for Government Agencies

(September, 2009, Riva Maryland) The Applied Technology Institute (ATIcourses.com) has introduced a new three-day short-course, Communications Payload Design–Satellite System Architecture, scheduled Nov 10-12, 2009 in Beltsville, MD. The new course is apropos to the U.S. Federal Government’s recent announcement that they will be appropriating $5 billion for the Federal Commercial Satellite Communications Service Acquisition (FCSA) […]
(September, 2009, Riva Maryland) The Applied Technology Institute (ATIcourses.com) has introduced a new three-day short-course, Communications Payload Design–Satellite System Architecture, scheduled Nov 10-12, 2009 in Beltsville, MD. The new course is apropos to the U.S. Federal Government’s recent announcement that they will be appropriating $5 billion for the Federal Commercial Satellite Communications Service Acquisition (FCSA) program. The FCSA program will replace several existing programs, streamlining satellite service acquisitions by allowing government agencies access to a wider choice of vendors, services and products, while speeding up the overall procurement process.

Satellite Communications expert, Bruce R. Elbert, with forty years of combined experience designing satellite communications payload and systems for COMSAT Laboratories and Hughes Electronics, will lead the course, which he says will be essential for government agencies. “Effective satellite communication depends on a clear understanding of the user requirements, including what information is to be communicated, where it must be communicated, and finally, how the unique situation of the user can be addressed (things such as whether the user is stationary or in motion on the ground, in the air or on the sea). There are a myriad of questions to be answered but there are solutions on the market that can potentially address them. Getting through this maze requires a good understanding of the alternative satellite capabilities, kinds of user terminals available, network architectures, and systems engineering processes.”

The Communications Payload Design–Satellite System Architecture course is designed to outline in detail the technical characteristics of a wide variety of satellites operating in different frequency bands, exploring the advantages and limitations of each, such as Lockheed Martin’s, Advanced Extremely High Frequency (AEHF) satellite. Elbert demonstrates this point explaining, “The military relies on mobility to extend and conduct operations in a wide variety of places. The system provided by Inmarsat would seem to be ideal because the user antennas are small and the network service is quite versatile, being IP based. However, the bandwidth afforded is low relative to many requirements and the cost per MByte is quite high as compared to, say, Ku band satellite services. Alternatively, Ku band is very popular because it addresses these issues, but the availability of Ku satellites is somewhat less and the attendant user antennas tend to be much larger. They also must be pointed rather accurately at the particular satellite in use, a challenge for moving vehicles,” he says.

Prospective end-users of the course are not limited to military and government audiences. It also provides knowledge and methodologies to use satellite communications for non-government applications in field such as oil and gas exploration and production, emergency management, transportation and broadcasting.

The Applied Technology Institute (ATI) specializes in professional development seminars in the technical areas of space, communications, defense, sonar, radar, and signal processing. For over twenty-five years, ATI has presented leading-edge technical training to defense and NASA facilities, as well as DOD and aerospace contractors. Their courses provide a clear understanding of the fundamental principles and a working knowledge of current technology and applications. ATI has the unique capability to schedule and deliver courses in a matter of weeks. They provide customized on-site training at your facility anywhere in the United States as well as internationally and offer over 200 annual public courses in dozens of locations. World-class design experts lead courses. To register for a course or request an on-site quote, call (410) 956-8805 or (888) 501-2100 or visit them on the web at http://www.aticourses.com/

Sound Levels and Mammal Mitigation

The effect of mid-frequency sonar on marine mammals is a controversial topic. This was originally posted on a Navy web site. Comparing Mid-Frequency Active Sonar to a Saturn V Rocket For several reasons, it is inaccurate and misleading to claim that the sound of mid-frequency active sonar in water is equivalent to a Saturn V […]
The effect of mid-frequency sonar on marine mammals is a controversial topic. This was originally posted on a Navy web site. Comparing Mid-Frequency Active Sonar to a Saturn V Rocket For several reasons, it is inaccurate and misleading to claim that the sound of mid-frequency active sonar in water is equivalent to a Saturn V rocket. Sound levels in water and sound levels in air are expressed very differently*, and therefore comparing sound levels in water and air must be done carefully. As an example of the difference in the way sound levels are received in air versus water, note that a sound level of 120 dB sound pressure level in air (similar to a rock music amplifier 4-6 feet from the listener) can cause hearing damage or distress to humans and animals, while human divers and animals receiving 120 dB sound pressure level underwater experience no such issues. 1. Saturn V Rocket is 10x Louder: At 1000 yards (914 m) from a Navy ship, the receive level for mid-frequency active sonar is approximately 175 dB in water. At the same distance in water, a Saturn V rocket would register 197 dB. This 22 dB difference means that the Saturn V rocket would have approximately ten times greater intensity than mid-frequency active sonar at the same distance. Temporary threshold shift (TTS), which is the National Marine Fisheries Service’s baseline for non-permanent effects on marine mammals, is 195 dB, so the Saturn V rocket would have the potential to cause TTS to marine mammals at 1000 yards, whereas mid-frequency active sonar at the same distance would not. 2. Saturn V Sound is Continuous, Mid-Frequency Active Sonar Sound is Intermittent: Rocket engine noise is a continuous sound source, lasting for many minutes at a time. By comparison, sonar pings are intermittent, with each ping lasting one second or less and being repeated about every 30 seconds. Over the course of one minute, ship and animal movement at sea would make it very unlikely that a marine mammal would be exposed to even two sonar pings. By comparison, marine mammals would be far more likely to be exposed to the continuous “roar” of rocket engine sound during a similar timeframe. 3. Saturn V Frequencies Would Potentially Affect More Species: Rocket engine sound is a broadband sound, spanning as many as five octave frequencies. Sonar signals are limited to a narrow band, typically 1/3 octave frequencies or less. The greater number of frequencies from the broadband rocket sound would make it likely that more types of species would be affected by the rocket sound than by the narrow band sound of mid-frequency active sonar. *All sound levels in water are referenced to 1 microPascal (μPa). All sound levels in air are referenced to 20 microPascal (μPa), often expressed as sound pressure level (SPL). Sound waves with the same intensities in water and air have relative intensities that differ by 61.5 decibels (dB). Therefore, 61.5 dB must be added to relative intensities in air to obtain the relative intensities of sound waves in water.

War Over The Whales: The Navy insists underwater warfare range won’t hurt rare right whales off Florida coast

Miami Herald September 10, 2009 By Curtis Morgan Every winter endangered North Atlantic right whales migrate to warm, shallow waters to give birth and nurse their young. That’s right next to where the U.S. Navy wants to conduct antisubmarine training. Florida isn’t known for whale watching, but every winter the coastline offers a haven for […]
Miami Herald September 10, 2009 By Curtis Morgan Every winter endangered North Atlantic right whales migrate to warm, shallow waters to give birth and nurse their young. That’s right next to where the U.S. Navy wants to conduct antisubmarine training. Florida isn’t known for whale watching, but every winter the coastline offers a haven for endangered North Atlantic right whales. They migrate to warm, shallow waters to give birth and nurse little — relatively speaking — one-ton bundles of blubber. That’s right next to where the U.S. Navy wants to conduct antisubmarine training. The Navy has selected a site bordering a federally protected whale nursery stretching from Savannah to Sebastian for an undersea warfare range, where ships, submarines and aircraft outfitted with powerful sonar can practice hunting subs. Citing voluminous studies, the Navy concluded that training 58 miles off Jacksonville would rarely, and barely, disturb right whales. Environmentalists say the Navy has soft-pedaled risks from the 500-square-mile range. Ship strikes already rank as the top right whale killer. The Navy also intends to heavily employ sonar that can disrupt feeding and communication, cause hearing damage and — in extreme cases — trigger mass strandings such as one in the Bahamas that killed six beaked whales in 2000. “It’s one of the worst possible places,” said Catherine Wannamaker, an attorney for the Southern Environmental Law Center, one of 21 groups that contested the choice. “It’s right next to the calving grounds for one of the rarest whales in the world.” The groups contend that the range poses a disruptive, potentially deadly threat to a whale population numbering no more than 400 — and that’s after producing 39 calves last year, the most in decades. Florida and Georgia environmental regulators have raised similar concerns. Navy is moving ahead because Florida’s location and logistics beat sites off South Carolina, North Carolina and Maryland. Jacksonville boasts a seaport, air base and submarine base across the St. Mary’s River in King’s Bay, Ga. The Navy already has a deep-water sonar range in the Bahamas, but Julie Ripley, the Navy’s environmental spokeswoman, said the shallow sea floor and busy shipping lanes off northeast Florida provide a real-world test for sonar operators who must pinpoint a new generation of stealthier subs. Environmentalists, who have been battling the Navy for years over sonar, argue that it’s the whales that are perishable. Though there are signs of slow recovery, scientists consider their future precarious. The whales take a decade to hit sexual maturity. Females produce one calf a year, so losing one prematurely can set back recovery. Ship strikes are such a serious concern — 22 whales were hit between 1999 and 2006, with 13 confirmed deaths — that the fisheries service last year imposed seasonal zones limiting large vessels to 10 knots in whale habitat. The Navy — involved in roughly one-sixth of 134 documented strikes over 60 years — was exempted. Factoring in total sea hours, the service calculated the chance of any Navy ship hitting a whale in any year at .0000472 percent. The chances of not doing it: 99.99 percent. While whales have been spotted 60 miles out where the range is planned, past surveys — which environmentalists consider inadequate — suggest that most swim relatively close to shore, some 30 miles from where the Navy plans to train. The Navy, which adopted whale-avoidance policies in 2002, also has proposed more precautions during calving season — posted lookouts, daytime training and exercising “extreme caution” in ship speed and sonar power. But environmentalists remain skeptical, pointing to a series of strikes that have killed whales since 2000, including six pregnant females. Then there is the complex question of sonar. For the Navy, it’s critical protection for military vessels and shipping lanes — particularly mid-frequency active systems that emit “pings” of powerful sound, measuring echoes to identify and track targets. There is no dispute that active sonar can disturb whales and dolphins. They rely on echolocation, their own internal sonar, to navigate and hunt, and use an array of calls or “songs” to communicate. But research — much of it bankrolled by $20 million a year from the Navy — shows widely varying impacts, depending on species and sonar levels. Animals can leave an area, possibly under stress, or abandon feeding or breeding. Some studies indicate that repeated exposure can cause temporary hearing loss. In the worst cases, fleeing whales and dolphins beach in mass, often fatal, strandings. The Navy, in a 2001 study after 17 whales and a dolphin beached in the Bahamas, acknowledged that its mid-frequency sonar played a role, but also pointed to an unusual confluence of other factors. Necropsies of whales that beached in the Canary Islands in 2002 during international naval exercises showed brain hemorrhages, vascular ruptures and lung congestion. One theory is that they bolt from depths so quickly their organs can’t handle rapid pressure changes — akin to the “bends,” or embolisms that divers suffer when surfacing too quickly. As a concession to state concerns, the Navy agreed not to lay fiber-optic cable and transducers during calving season, which runs from mid-November to mid-April. Wannamaker said it would resolve many concerns if the Navy made the same pledge for sonar training. The Navy responded that option has “been given consideration” but that they want to retain “flexibility.” Wannamaker said the groups are pondering a lawsuit, not trusting that more studies and surveys will sway the final decision. “Once you build a $100 million project,” she said, “nobody is going to tell them they can’t use it.” Full story here.

Explosives Technology & Modeling Course gets attention of the Baltimore Sun tech-guru

Our new course, Explosives Technology & Modeling got the attention of the Baltimore Sun tech-guru last week in his blog posting, Things That Go Boom. http://weblogs.baltimoresun.com/news/technology/2009/08/learning_about_things_that_go.html
Our new course, Explosives Technology & Modeling got the attention of the Baltimore Sun tech-guru last week in his blog posting, Things That Go Boom. http://weblogs.baltimoresun.com/news/technology/2009/08/learning_about_things_that_go.html

Can You Pass the CSEP Exam?

Certified Systems Engineers Are In Demand (RIVA, Md., March 2009) Just as you would not attempt a state bar exam without studying, you should not attempt the CSEP (Certified Systems Engineer Professional) exam without preparation. By taking a preparatory course, you can yield great benefits in performance, stress reduction and overall, greatly improve your chances […]
Certified Systems Engineers Are In Demand (RIVA, Md., March 2009) Just as you would not attempt a state bar exam without studying, you should not attempt the CSEP (Certified Systems Engineer Professional) exam without preparation. By taking a preparatory course, you can yield great benefits in performance, stress reduction and overall, greatly improve your chances of passing the exam.

While the economy is down, the demand for systems engineers is still growing–but supply is low. Last October, Jitu Desai of IBM said, “The demand for systems engineering management of complex programs is increasing. This is coupled with the new technologies that are entering the marketplace to make it both easier and more difficult to manage. We need new ways of managing design and development activities of major systems. This method includes access to global talent and skills, as well as the marketplace offerings that provide improved methods for collaborating innovations.”

To assist you in your career, the Applied Technology Institute (ATI) has added a CSEP preparation course to its curriculum. Systems engineering is a profession, practice and way of doing business that concentrates on the design and application of the whole system to produce a successful product or system.

The International Council on Systems Engineering (INCOSE) has established a Professional Certification Program to provide a formal method for recognizing the knowledge and experience of systems engineers. The INCOSE Certified Systems Engineering Professional (CSEP) rating is a more coveted milestone in the career of a systems engineer, demonstrating knowledge, education and experience and is of high value to systems organizations.

Test what you know. ATIcourses has posted samples from its CSEP Preparation class on its web site at: www.ATIcourses.com/sampler/CSEP_Preparation_CourseSampler.pdf These materials include information on how to apply successfully for the CSEP, a study plan to pass the CSEP exam, sample questions to assess your skills and a guide to completing your application selected from a full two-day course CSEP Preparation sponsored by the Applied Technology Institute. This two-day course walks you through the CSEP requirements and the INCOSE Handbook Version 3.1 to cover all topics on the CSEP exam. Interactive work and study plans, and sample examination questions will help you to prepare effectively for the exam. Participants complete the course with solid knowledge, a hard copy of the INCOSE Handbook, study plans, and a sample examination.

This course is currently scheduled as a public offering at several dates and locations: Your facility can request this course as an on-site presentation. The current schedule includes the following public dates open to all:

CSEP Preparation Sep 16-17, 2009 Chantilly, VA CSEP Preparation Oct 23-24, 2009 Albuquerque, NM CSEP Preparation February 26-27, 2010 Orlando, FL CSEP Preparation Mar 31-Apr 1, 2010 Columbia, MD

The instructor is Eric Honour, an international consultant and lecturer, who has a 38-year career of complex systems development & operation. He was Founder and former President of INCOSE. He has led the development of 18 major systems, including the Air Combat Maneuvering Instrumentation systems and the Battle Group Passive Horizon Extension System locations.

ATI, a leader in scientific and technical training since 1984, will be hosting the course. ATI specializes in training seminars for professionals working in radar, sonar, space systems, satellites and systems engineering. For more information contact Applied Technology Institute at (888) 501-2100 or register online at www.ATIcourses.com.

Tough Economic Times Intensify Need for Technical Training

(September 2009, Riva MD) With technical companies realizing a massive spike in layoffs during January and February this year, those who are still hanging on have an even greater motivation for seeking out technical training. “When the economy is down, employees need to work even harder to make sure they are current in their field, […]
(September 2009, Riva MD) With technical companies realizing a massive spike in layoffs during January and February this year, those who are still hanging on have an even greater motivation for seeking out technical training. “When the economy is down, employees need to work even harder to make sure they are current in their field, particularly in high-tech industries,” says Jim Jenkins, Technical Director of Applied Technology Institute, a short course technical training company headquartered in the DC metro area that provides training to companies like NASA, Lockheed Martin and Sandia.

With job security worries looming, developing technical skills that will expand the kinds of projects you are qualified to work on can make you a more valuable employee. Actively seeking out and pursuing what training resources are offered through your company can help to ensure your value as an employee and also prepare you in a worst-case scenario.  Jenkins adds,“That way, if either your company decides to make cuts, less qualified staff may be first to go, or you are prepared to face the job market with more technical knowledge and tools under your belt.”

He recommends employees notify their departmental managers of what training they need to further increase their job performance and productivity. And by deepening your existing knowledge and expanding your skill set you can potentially increase your salary. Jobs requiring high-technical skill earn higher pay. Another reason continual technical training is a must is that it helps to ensure you advance with changing technology. When you neglect to keep abreast of the latest technologies, you risk losing your competitive edge in the market. As the business world becomes more competitive, successful companies will seek employees with the most up-to-date skills and knowledge.

Job productivity can also be improved with technical training. A 2001 study by the National Centre for Vocational Education Research found that where training is coupled with a drive for innovation, high product quality, and/or technological innovation, training has contributed to their achievement. Furthermore, the study  found that where employees have a strong grounding in math, science and/or technology, training has delivered extra productivity benefits.

Attending training also can put you in touch with peers in your industry affording you the opportunity to network. Networking can help you in a future job search, discover new industry trends, and overall get new ideas, insights and wisdom from a broader audience than your limited office environment. Applied Technology Institute (ATI) The Applied Technology Institute (ATI) specializes in short course technical training in space, communications, defense, sonar, radar, and signal processing. Since 1984 ATI has provided leading-edge public courses and on-site technical training to defense and NASA facilities, as well as DOD and aerospace contractors. Their courses provide a clear understanding of the fundamental principles and a working knowledge of current technology and applications. World-class design experts lead courses. To register, call (888) 501-2100, or visit them on the web at www.ATIcourses.com

ATICourses Announces A New Course: Fundamentals Of Understanding Space

New ATI Course Bolsters President’s Anticipated Robust Funding of Human Space Flight Program The Applied Technology Institute (ATIcourses.com) has introduced a new two-day short-course, Understanding Space  scheduled September 28-29 in Beltsville, MD and October 22-23 in Albuquerque, NM. The timely new course will facilitate training for aerospace professionals to support the significant growth expected in […]
New ATI Course Bolsters President’s Anticipated Robust Funding of Human Space Flight Program

The Applied Technology Institute (ATIcourses.com) has introduced a new two-day short-course, Understanding Space  scheduled September 28-29 in Beltsville, MD and October 22-23 in Albuquerque, NM. The timely new course will facilitate training for aerospace professionals to support the significant growth expected in the industry.

Last month, Next Step in Space Coalition announced that President Obama’s Review of U.S. Human Space Flight Plans Committee will be recommending an appropriation of 2.5 billion in funding over four years starting in FY2011 to support development of commercial human space transport and capabilities. The review panel’s announcement echoes a declaration earlier in August by NASA that they will invest $50 million of Recovery Act funds to develop a commercial crew program. The funding of these programs is projected to greatly bolster engineering, analysis, design and research jobs.

Tom Logsdon is a top industry expert, author of 29 non-fiction books, and instructor for Understanding Space. He specifically designed the course to provide today’s busy professionals with all the skills they will need to assure themselves a bright, shining future serving tomorrow’s satellites and the astronauts living and working along the space frontier. Examining the status quo, he finds it,  “…rather amazing that our country, the world’s preeminent space power, is currently forced to rely on Russian rockets to carry our American astronauts up to the International Space Station; so I was delighted to read that President Obama’s review panel is so strongly focused on developing new and improved American rockets to supply the station in future years.”  His recent article, Striking it Rich in Space, reflects back on Space Industrialist Expert, Art Dula’s 1980’s prediction – so vehemently criticized at the time – of massive space industry growth in the beginning of the twenty-first century.

  Logsdon has long advocated inexpensive access to space, remarking in a recent interview, “ I help my students find clever new ways to gain access to space.  My approach includes conventional chemical rockets with more pizzazz as well as practical alternatives to chemical rockets.”  He tells his students, “There is nothing wrong with the space program that the elimination of chemical rockets won’t cure.”

   The Applied Technology Institute (ATI) specializes in professional development seminars in the technical areas of space, communications, defense, sonar, radar, and signal processing. For over twenty-five years, ATI has presented leading-edge technical training to defense and NASA facilities, as well as DOD and aerospace contractors. Their courses provide a clear understanding of the fundamental principles and a working knowledge of current technology and applications. ATI has the unique capability to schedule and deliver courses in a matter of weeks. They  provide customized on-site training at your facility anywhere in the United States as well as internationally and offer over 200 annual public courses in dozens of locations. World-class design experts lead courses.  To register for a course or request an on-site quote, call (410) 956-8805 or (888) 501-2100 or visit  http://www.aticourses.com/

Applied Technology Institute Announces New Explosives Technology and Modeling Course

ATIcourses has announced a new course for technical and administrative professionals in aerospace and defense, Explosives Technology and Modeling. The four-day short course, previously presented on-site at ATK, Eglin Air Force base, and Sandia National Labs, is now being offered to the public on Jan 25-29, 2010 in Beltsville, Maryland. The course will introduce shock […]
ATIcourses has announced a new course for technical and administrative professionals in aerospace and defense, Explosives Technology and Modeling. The four-day short course, previously presented on-site at ATK, Eglin Air Force base, and Sandia National Labs, is now being offered to the public on Jan 25-29, 2010 in Beltsville, Maryland. The course will introduce shock waves and review performance, detonation, hazards, and vulnerabilities of explosives, and propellants. In addition, attendees will get hands-on, computer experience using modeling codes for evaluating explosive and propellant performance. Expert in the field and instructor for the new course, Charles L. Mader, Ph.D., a retired Fellow of the Los Alamos National Laboratory, President of Mader Consulting Company, and author of numerous books on the subject, says that many of the propellants in use today by the military and NASA also perform as explosives –often more powerful and more hazardous than those used in World War II. “The difference between most current explosives and propellants is only the intended application,” he says. Applications for explosives and propellants range from rockets on nuclear submarines, space shuttles, solid rockets, missiles and most commonly, conventional weapons, like the Massive Ordnance Penetrator (MOP) bunker buster, a 30,000-pound non-nuclear guided bomb. Still in development by the US Air Force, the MOP promises to act as a deterrent to burying illicit weapons program facilities while significantly increasing the U.S. ability to destroy those that already exist. (Stratfor; Aug 2009) Mader’s Explosives Technology and Modeling course directly relates to the new generation of technology developments like the MOP bunker buster. He says, “I will describe how to model the performance and vulnerability of explosives and propellants as a major focus of the course.” The primary audience of the new course will likely be those in direct association of design, building and testing—engineers and scientists. A secondary audience for the course is administrators, managers and decision-makers who need to have a basic understanding of explosives and propellants scientific jargon in order to successfully communicate with technical project counterparts so they can evaluate and determine the validity and value of presented technical information. Another unique benefit of the course is a review of the history of explosives and propellants through the current state of the technology. This history is not easily found elsewhere and also furnishes attendees with credible sources and references for additional information after the course. Prospective attendees can view the sampler before attending or read the full course description, by visiting the links below. http://www.aticourses.com/explosives_modeling.htm http://aticourses.com/ExplosivesTechnology&Modeling_CourseSampler.pdf The Applied Technology Institute (ATI) specializes in professional development seminars in the technical areas of space, communications, defense, sonar, radar, and signal processing. For over twenty-five years, ATI has presented leading-edge technical training to defense and NASA facilities, as well as DOD and aerospace contractors. Their courses provide a clear understanding of the fundamental principles and a working knowledge of current technology and applications. ATI has the unique capability to schedule and deliver courses in a matter of weeks. They offer customized on-site training at your facility anywhere in the United States as well as internationally and over 200 annual public courses in dozens of locations. World-class design experts lead courses. To register or for an on-site quote, call (888) 501-2100, or visit them on the web at www.ATIcourses.com

Side Scan Sonar Technology with left and right side-viewing with up to 480 ft of underwater coverage

Lowrance announced today the premier of its next-generation sonar technology, the LSS-1 StructureScan(TM) sonar imaging module for Lowrance High Definition Systems (HDS), at ICAST 2009 in Orlando, Florida. Raising the bar in fish-finding technology, the sonar-imaging module is the world’s first to offer anglers a new dimension in underwater picture-like displays – side-to-side plus straight […]
Lowrance announced today the premier of its next-generation sonar technology, the LSS-1 StructureScan(TM) sonar imaging module for Lowrance High Definition Systems (HDS), at ICAST 2009 in Orlando, Florida. Raising the bar in fish-finding technology, the sonar-imaging module is the world’s first to offer anglers a new dimension in underwater picture-like displays – side-to-side plus straight down, full panoramic viewing. The innovative Lowrance StructureScan features a combination of SideScan and an exclusive new DownScan Imaging(TM) technology. SideScan provides full-screen left and right side-viewing with extra-crisp detail of up to 480 ft. (146 m) of underwater coverage that displays structure and fish targets, as well as their imaging-scan shadows. The new DownScan Imaging feature allows anglers, for the first time, to see submerged detail directly beneath their boats, providing a complete underwater picture in a screen format that is easy to interpret. With revolutionary on-screen display versatility, anglers can merge Lowrance side and down sonar scans in split-screen to view wide-area surveys and highly-defined detail. As a unique new tool, anglers can also compare DownScan Imaging with 2D sonar images in split-screen display to better distinguish fish from structure. Removing all of the guesswork common to existing fish-finding technology, the new LSS-1 delivers the highest underwater definition ever achieved with crystal-clear views in shallow and deep, freshwater or saltwater – even at speeds up to 30 mph.

IP Networking Over Satellite Acronyms

Additonal Acronyms ABS   –   Accounting and Billing Server ARP    –   Address Resolution Protocol CRTT   –   Compressed Real Time Transport Protocol CS-ACELP   –   Conjugate-Structured Algebraic Code-Excited Linear Prediction CTP   –   Circuit to Packet DAS   –   Direct Access System DCM   –   Dynamic Coding and Modulation DVP   –   Distance Vector Protocol FEC   –   Forward Error Correction FH   –   […]

Additonal Acronyms

ABS   –   Accounting and Billing Server ARP    –   Address Resolution Protocol CRTT   –   Compressed Real Time Transport Protocol CS-ACELP   –   Conjugate-Structured Algebraic Code-Excited Linear Prediction CTP   –   Circuit to Packet DAS   –   Direct Access System DCM   –   Dynamic Coding and Modulation DVP   –   Distance Vector Protocol FEC   –   Forward Error Correction FH   –   Frame Header FT   –   Frame Trailer IANA   –   Internet Address Naming Association IKE    –   Internet Key Exchange IPH   –   IP Header IS-IS   –   Intermediate System to Intermediate System LSP   –    Link State Protocol MIB   –   Management Information Base MOS   –   Mean Opinion Score OC    –   Optical Carrier PPP   –   Point to Point Protocol RAS   –   Remote Access System RED   –   Random Early Detection RTCP   –   Real Time Control Protocol SIP   –   Session Initiation Protocol TCPH   –   TCP Header TIPH   –   Tunnel Internet Protocol Header VAD   –   Voice Activity Detection   IP Networking Over Satellite   taught by Burt H. Liebowitz was held on July 20-22, 2009 in Laurel, MD and was very well reviewed by all.  One attendee, Dennis Almer,  supplied the preceding acronyms to complement the course.

Radar technology helps DHS find underground tunnels used by smugglers

The department of homeland security (DHS) announced its plan to use radar technology specifically designed to find underground tunnels along the border. Current ground penetrating radar systems are already being used by civil engineers to detect underground pipes and tunnels. These systems, however, can only penetrate a few meters beneath the ground surface and are […]
The department of homeland security (DHS) announced its plan to use radar technology specifically designed to find underground tunnels along the border. Current ground penetrating radar systems are already being used by civil engineers to detect underground pipes and tunnels. These systems, however, can only penetrate a few meters beneath the ground surface and are not adequate to accurately detect smugglers tunnels, which are often located much deeper below the surface. The new radar systems being developed for the DHS by Lockheed Martin will use a lower frequency and will be able penetrate deeper below the surface. The system will consist of a sophisticated imaging system and portable radar antennas towed behind border patrol trucks. The antenna signals will then be used to “formulate a multi-colored picture of the earth” and border patrol agents will be able to clearly see the tunnels on the monitor. Lockheed Martin team will begin testing the new system this summer, along the U.S. Southwest border to see if the new ground penetrating radar system can differentiate between tunnels, rocks, and other objects in the ground. http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,529643,00.html http://www.usnews.com/articles/science/2009/07/01/border-patrol-agents-to-spot-tunnels-with-advanced-ground-penetrating-radar.html

Seafloor mapping – the many uses of multi-beam sonar

Scientists on board a federal fisheries research vassal in Alaska’s Pribilof Islands are using multi-beam sonar to survey and map seafloors. According to ecologists, mapping this vital crab habitat is an important step in preserving deteriorating king crab populations. The primary goal of current mapping pilot project is to test the usefulness of multi-beam sonar […]
Scientists on board a federal fisheries research vassal in Alaska’s Pribilof Islands are using multi-beam sonar to survey and map seafloors. According to ecologists, mapping this vital crab habitat is an important step in preserving deteriorating king crab populations. The primary goal of current mapping pilot project is to test the usefulness of multi-beam sonar systems for finding “shell hash” (deposits of crushed crab shell believed to be important in the survival of young crabs). In the past efforts to monitor, crab populations and record vital habitats were limited to trawl and pot surveys. Although these surveys could inform ecologist which habitats were being used as nursery grounds for immature crabs they could not provide much needed information regarding the habitat itself. Today’s current multi-beam sonar technology has the potential to drastically transform ecologist’s ability to monitor and preserve critical habitats of declining sea species. These technologies, however, do not come without a cost. According to Michelle Ridgway, the ecologist in charge of the shell hash project the systems currently being tested cost over $3,000 an hour to operate. After the initial data is, collected Ridgway will compare the newly collected sonar imagery to seafloor samples, side scan sonar imagery, and remotely operated vehicle video that have already been collected to help interpret the acoustic backscatter images. http://www.alaskajournal.com/stories/062609/fis_img9_001.shtml

Global Digital Elevation Map Released to The Public

Massive satellite derived digital elevation data base released to the public. NASA and Japan’s Ministry of Economy, Trade and industry (METI) announced the release of the ASTER Global Digital Elevation Model (GDEM) digital elevation maps. The GDEM was created by stereo-correlating the 1.3 million scene ASTER VNIR archive, covering the Earth’s land surface between 83N […]
Massive satellite derived digital elevation data base released to the public. NASA and Japan’s Ministry of Economy, Trade and industry (METI) announced the release of the ASTER Global Digital Elevation Model (GDEM) digital elevation maps. The GDEM was created by stereo-correlating the 1.3 million scene ASTER VNIR archive, covering the Earth’s land surface between 83N and 83S latitudes. The GDEM is produced with 30 meter postings, and is formatted in 1 x 1 degree tiles as GeoTIFF files. Each GDEM file is accompanied by a Quality Assessment file, either giving the number of ASTER scenes used to calculate a pixel’s value, or indicating the source of external DEM data used to fill the ASTER voids. http://asterweb.jpl.nasa.gov/gdem.asp

ATIcourses students interested in defense will be interested to learn that the USS Carl Vinson (CVN 70) successfully completed its ship trial.

ATIcourses students interested in defense will be interested to learn that the USS Carl Vinson (CVN 70) successfully completed its ship trial. After over four years in Refueling Complex Overhaul (RCOH) USS Carl Vinson (CVN 70) Combat Systems Telecomm Center is getting ready for the upcoming sea trials by starting up new programs and equipment. […]
ATIcourses students interested in defense will be interested to learn that the USS Carl Vinson (CVN 70) successfully completed its ship trial. After over four years in Refueling Complex Overhaul (RCOH) USS Carl Vinson (CVN 70) Combat Systems Telecomm Center is getting ready for the upcoming sea trials by starting up new programs and equipment. http://www.cvn70.navy.mil/ Telecomm provides vital networking, communications and a link to the outside world, such as internet and phones, while transiting out at sea. “We have to make sure that all of our critical communication circuits are up and working properly,” said Information Systems Technician 1st Class (SW) Jamone Robertson, Telecomm leading petty officer. “Whether the call goes to the bridge or to the next work center, it just has to work.” Telecommunications division has undergone extensive renovations involving the replacement of more than 20,000 lbs of communications security equipment and information systems since 2005. “When we sever all pier connections we have to be completely self sufficient,” said IT2 (SW/AW) Michelle Venner, Tech Control supervisor. “So we do everything we can to keep our systems performing at the highest level.” In RCOH, Telecomm was involved in multiple system upgrades, personnel training to ensure they are proficient enough to setup and maintain over 150 critical data, imagery, and voice circuits. They also administer the secret ISNS network and efficiently distribute message traffic in support of all mission critical efforts. “The systems that we set up and maintain effect over 3,000 people,” said Robertson. “We give them the ability to communicate on an operational platform as well as stay in contact with loved ones across the world. And out [at sea], that’s important.” USS Carl Vinson is completing its scheduled RCOH at Northrop Grumman Shipbuilding. The RCOH is an extensive yard period that all Nimitz-class aircraft carriers go through near the mid-point of their 50-year life cycle. During RCOH, Carl Vinson’s nuclear fuel has been replenished and the ship’s services and infrastructure upgraded to make her the most state-of-the-art aircraft carrier in the fleet and prepare for another 25 years or more of service.

More on Sonar Search for AF 447

Information about sonar and side-scan sonar is presented in the short course Sonar Signal Processing Jul 14-16, 2009 Beltsville, MD The sonar search for the Air France Flight 447 flight and voice recorder continues with out any reported success. The underwater sonar has an acoustic frequency of 37.5kHz, transmitting initially with 1,060 dynes/cm2, and has […]
Information about sonar and side-scan sonar is presented in the short course Sonar Signal Processing Jul 14-16, 2009 Beltsville, MD The sonar search for the Air France Flight 447 flight and voice recorder continues with out any reported success. The underwater sonar has an acoustic frequency of 37.5kHz, transmitting initially with 1,060 dynes/cm2, and has a battery life of at least 30 days. Maximum detection range is 2–3km. The water depth is about 3500 m, so a towed sonar is required to get deep enough to have a chance to hear the pinger. There is useful information at http://www.hydro-international.com/issues/articles/id1098-Air_France_Flight_AF.html French authorities have dispatched five ships: IFREMER research vesselPourquoi Pas; two tugboats, Fairmount Glacier and Fairmount Expedition; naval frigateVentôse; and nuclear submarine Emeraude.Ventôse has assisted with recovery of floating debris and bodies. Emeraude will conduct an initial search listening for the black-box pinger. Once this has been located, Pourquoi Pas shall carry out a side-scan sonar survey and there are plans to then deploy a mini-submarine to carry out a detailed photographic survey leading to recovery operations. The accident location is 1,000km from the Brazilian coastline and the sea floor is extremely rugged (making side-scan sonar operations troublesome) and around 3,500 metres deep (making it difficult to detect the black-box pinger with a maximum range of 2–3km). Both operations will require a submersible or deep-tow capability for sensor deployments. Subsequent recovery of substantial aircraft parts will be an almost-impossible task and operations will probably be limited to flight recorder recovery and a detailed sonar and photographic survey. http://www.hydro-international.com/issues/articles/id1098-Air_France_Flight_AF.html