USS Normandy Sails On Around-The-World Journey

Applied Technology Institute (ATICourses) offers a variety of courses on Radar, Missiles & Combat Systems.  We thinks the news below will be of interest to our readers. USS Normandy- one of the crown jewels of the Atlantic fleet set off on around-the-world journey out of Norfolk, VA on March 14, 2015.  USS Normandy (CG-60) is a Ticonderoga-class guided-missile […]
Applied Technology Institute (ATICourses) offers a variety of courses on Radar, Missiles & Combat Systems.  We thinks the news below will be of interest to our readers. USS Normandy- one of the crown jewels of the Atlantic fleet set off on around-the-world journey out of Norfolk, VA on March 14, 2015.  USS Normandy (CG-60) is a Ticonderoga-class guided-missile cruiser in the service of the United States Navy. Armed with naval guns and anti-air, anti-surface, and anti-submarine missiles, plus other weapons, she is equipped for surface-to-air, surface-to-surface, and anti-submarine warfare. The cruiser was the first US warship since 1945 to go to war on her maiden cruise and in 1998 she was awarded the title “Most Tomahawks shot by a U.S. Navy Cruiser”. She is named for the World War II Battle of Normandy, France, on and following D-Day. The crew is fairly new and most haven’t been deployed before.  However, they have been put through hundreds of hours of testing and aced UNSURV inspection.  The armament of this ship is truly impressive, including: 2 × 61 cell Mk 41 vertical launch systems containing 8 × RGM-84 Harpoon missiles 2 × Mk 45 Mod 2 5-in/54-callightweight gun 2 × 25 mm Mk 38 gun 2–4 × .50 cal (12.7 mm) gun 2 × Phalanx CIWS Block 1B 2 × Mk 32 12.75-in (324 mm) triple torpedo tubes for lightweight torpedoes The deployment will be hard on the families but we are sure that the crew will fulfill their mission with distinction.  
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SSN 723- The Los Angeles-class submarine USS Oklahoma will replace SSN 705 (USS City Of Corpus Christi) in Guam

ATI Courses is scheduled to present Submarines and Anti-Submarine Warfare course on June 21-23, 2011 in Columbia, MD.  We thought our blog readers will be interested in the news on USS Oklahoma. USS Oklahoma (SSN 723) arrived in Guam to replace USS City Of Corpus Christi (SSN 705).  The arrival ceremony was held on March 3, […]
ATI Courses is scheduled to present Submarines and Anti-Submarine Warfare course on June 21-23, 2011 in Columbia, MD.  We thought our blog readers will be interested in the news on USS Oklahoma. USS Oklahoma (SSN 723) arrived in Guam to replace USS City Of Corpus Christi (SSN 705).  The arrival ceremony was held on March 3, 2011 at Naval Base Guam. USS Oklahoma is the Los-Angeles class submarine.  LA class  nuclear-powered fast attack submarines (SSN) form the back bone of the US submarine fleet.  LA class is represented by 45 subs on active duty. According to the U.S. government, the top speed of Los Angeles-class submarines is over 25 knots (46 km/h, 29 mph), although the precise maximum is classified. Some estimates put the top speed at 30–33 knots. Tom Clancy, in his book Submarine: A Guided Tour Inside a Nuclear Warship, puts the top speed of a Los Angeles class submarine at 37 knots. Government sources give the maximum operating depth as 650 feet (200 m), while Patrick Tyler, in his book Running Critical, suggests a maximum operating depth of 950 feet (290 m). Although Tyler cites the 688-class design committee for this figure, the government has not commented on it. The maximum diving depth is 1,475 feet (450 m) according to Jane’s Fighting Ships, 2004-2005 Edition, edited by Commodore Stephen Saunders of Royal Navy. Los Angeles class submarines carry about 25 torpedo-tube-launched weapons and all boats of the class are capable of launching Tomahawk cruise missiles horizontally (from the torpedo tubes). The last 31 boats of this class also have 12 dedicated vertical launching system (VLS) tubes for launching Tomahawks. USS Oklahoma will be assigned to Commander, Submarine Squadron 15. Forward-deployed submarines are readily capable of meeting global operational requirements. Guam’s strategic location enhances military force flexibility. Its location allows freedom of action, regional engagement, crisis response and deterrence, while helping to fulfill commitments to U.S. allies and partners to protect the nation’s security.
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