Applied Technology Institute Announces New Explosives Technology and Modeling Course

ATIcourses has announced a new course for technical and administrative professionals in aerospace and defense, Explosives Technology and Modeling. The four-day short course, previously presented on-site at ATK, Eglin Air Force base, and Sandia National Labs, is now being offered to the public on Jan 25-29, 2010 in Beltsville, Maryland. The course will introduce shock […]
ATIcourses has announced a new course for technical and administrative professionals in aerospace and defense, Explosives Technology and Modeling. The four-day short course, previously presented on-site at ATK, Eglin Air Force base, and Sandia National Labs, is now being offered to the public on Jan 25-29, 2010 in Beltsville, Maryland. The course will introduce shock waves and review performance, detonation, hazards, and vulnerabilities of explosives, and propellants. In addition, attendees will get hands-on, computer experience using modeling codes for evaluating explosive and propellant performance. Expert in the field and instructor for the new course, Charles L. Mader, Ph.D., a retired Fellow of the Los Alamos National Laboratory, President of Mader Consulting Company, and author of numerous books on the subject, says that many of the propellants in use today by the military and NASA also perform as explosives –often more powerful and more hazardous than those used in World War II. “The difference between most current explosives and propellants is only the intended application,” he says. Applications for explosives and propellants range from rockets on nuclear submarines, space shuttles, solid rockets, missiles and most commonly, conventional weapons, like the Massive Ordnance Penetrator (MOP) bunker buster, a 30,000-pound non-nuclear guided bomb. Still in development by the US Air Force, the MOP promises to act as a deterrent to burying illicit weapons program facilities while significantly increasing the U.S. ability to destroy those that already exist. (Stratfor; Aug 2009) Mader’s Explosives Technology and Modeling course directly relates to the new generation of technology developments like the MOP bunker buster. He says, “I will describe how to model the performance and vulnerability of explosives and propellants as a major focus of the course.” The primary audience of the new course will likely be those in direct association of design, building and testing—engineers and scientists. A secondary audience for the course is administrators, managers and decision-makers who need to have a basic understanding of explosives and propellants scientific jargon in order to successfully communicate with technical project counterparts so they can evaluate and determine the validity and value of presented technical information. Another unique benefit of the course is a review of the history of explosives and propellants through the current state of the technology. This history is not easily found elsewhere and also furnishes attendees with credible sources and references for additional information after the course. Prospective attendees can view the sampler before attending or read the full course description, by visiting the links below. http://www.aticourses.com/explosives_modeling.htm http://aticourses.com/ExplosivesTechnology&Modeling_CourseSampler.pdf The Applied Technology Institute (ATI) specializes in professional development seminars in the technical areas of space, communications, defense, sonar, radar, and signal processing. For over twenty-five years, ATI has presented leading-edge technical training to defense and NASA facilities, as well as DOD and aerospace contractors. Their courses provide a clear understanding of the fundamental principles and a working knowledge of current technology and applications. ATI has the unique capability to schedule and deliver courses in a matter of weeks. They offer customized on-site training at your facility anywhere in the United States as well as internationally and over 200 annual public courses in dozens of locations. World-class design experts lead courses. To register or for an on-site quote, call (888) 501-2100, or visit them on the web at www.ATIcourses.com

IP Networking Over Satellite Acronyms

Additonal Acronyms ABS   –   Accounting and Billing Server ARP    –   Address Resolution Protocol CRTT   –   Compressed Real Time Transport Protocol CS-ACELP   –   Conjugate-Structured Algebraic Code-Excited Linear Prediction CTP   –   Circuit to Packet DAS   –   Direct Access System DCM   –   Dynamic Coding and Modulation DVP   –   Distance Vector Protocol FEC   –   Forward Error Correction FH   –   […]

Additonal Acronyms

ABS   –   Accounting and Billing Server ARP    –   Address Resolution Protocol CRTT   –   Compressed Real Time Transport Protocol CS-ACELP   –   Conjugate-Structured Algebraic Code-Excited Linear Prediction CTP   –   Circuit to Packet DAS   –   Direct Access System DCM   –   Dynamic Coding and Modulation DVP   –   Distance Vector Protocol FEC   –   Forward Error Correction FH   –   Frame Header FT   –   Frame Trailer IANA   –   Internet Address Naming Association IKE    –   Internet Key Exchange IPH   –   IP Header IS-IS   –   Intermediate System to Intermediate System LSP   –    Link State Protocol MIB   –   Management Information Base MOS   –   Mean Opinion Score OC    –   Optical Carrier PPP   –   Point to Point Protocol RAS   –   Remote Access System RED   –   Random Early Detection RTCP   –   Real Time Control Protocol SIP   –   Session Initiation Protocol TCPH   –   TCP Header TIPH   –   Tunnel Internet Protocol Header VAD   –   Voice Activity Detection   IP Networking Over Satellite   taught by Burt H. Liebowitz was held on July 20-22, 2009 in Laurel, MD and was very well reviewed by all.  One attendee, Dennis Almer,  supplied the preceding acronyms to complement the course.