MARS FOUR: Alarming Facts About Extraterrestrial Life On Mars

Last weekend, NASA called for a press conference to announce a major discovery regarding the planet Mars. During the meeting, they revealed some pretty shocking information, completely changing what we once thought about the “red” planet that, suddenly, doesn’t seem so red anymore. 1. Mars Has Flowing Rivers Of Water On It NASA announced that […]
Last weekend, NASA called for a press conference to announce a major discovery regarding the planet Mars. During the meeting, they revealed some pretty shocking information, completely changing what we once thought about the “red” planet that, suddenly, doesn’t seem so red anymore.

1. Mars Has Flowing Rivers Of Water On It

NASA announced that Mars actually has rivers of flowing water on it. What we once believed to be an arid and rocky desert of a planet is actually seasonal, not unlike our own planet Earth.

2. Mars Could Have Had Extraterrestrial Life Living On It

Obviously, with the announcement that there is water on Mars, the possibility of life near the surface becomes ever more plausible. Another interesting fact is that the possibility of life in the interior of Mars has always been quite high. “The possibility of life in the interior of Mars has always been very high. There’s certainly water somewhere in the crust of Mars … It’s very likely, I think, that there is life somewhere in the crust of Mars.” – Alfred McEwen, Principal Investigator, HiRISE, University of Arizona

3. Mars Was Once A Planet Very Much Like Earth, With A Giant Ocean

Mars is the planet most like Earth … [and in the past,] Mars was a very different planet, it had an extensive atmosphere, and in fact it had what is believed to have been a huge ocean, perhaps as large as two thirds the Northern Hemisphere. And that ocean may have been as much as a mile deep. So Mars indeed three billion years ago had extensive water resources. But something happened. Mars suffered a major climate change and lost its surface water.

4. Something Happened To The Planet That Drastically Changed Its Climate

Did historical intelligent life on the planet Mars have something to do with its drastic climate shift? At this point it’s impossible to say, but according to Dr. John Brandenburg, PhD, and plasma physicist, life on Mars was eradicated by nuclear war. He believes that a couple of intelligent civilizations from ancient history were responsbile for this, and in his published works, argues that the coloration and composition of Martian soil points to a series of “mixed-fission explosions” which lead to nuclear fallout on the planet. Regardless of what caused Mars’ climate shift, we’ve certainly been left with some fascinating information to consider.


Sign Up For ATI Courses eNewsletter

Last Chance Star Wars Fans! Dunes to bury Anakin Skywalker’s hometown.

Sand dunes moving across Tunisia will soon bury a set used in Star Wars Episode I, The Phantom Menace. The city of Mos Espa on Tattooine, home to Anakin Skywalker, will be engulfed by a dune moving at 15 metres a year across the desert at some point over the next year. Its leading edge […]
This tourist photo, acquired by the researchers in December 2012, shows the edge of the barchan making contact with a building on the Mos Espa movie set in Tunisia. (Credit: S. Slater)
Sand dunes moving across Tunisia will soon bury a set used in Star Wars Episode I, The Phantom Menace. The city of Mos Espa on Tattooine, home to Anakin Skywalker, will be engulfed by a dune moving at 15 metres a year across the desert at some point over the next year. Its leading edge has already made contact with some of the buildings on the site, an is bearing down on Qui-Gon’s Alley. The event is being used by researchers to study the speed of the wind-blown dunes, known as barchans. Sand is blown up the gentle windward slope before falling down the steep leeward slope. As well as Tattooine/Tunisia, barchans have also been spotted on Mars and on Saturn’s moon Titan. By understanding their dynamics, it’s possible researchers could begin to design dwellings that funnel the sand around them, allowing dune fields to be settled. The barchan is unlikely to be too bothered by the site it’s passing over, which will re-emerge from the sand in time. Read more here.
Sign Up For ATI Courses eNewsletter

NASA’s ‘Curiosity’ readies to hit the Martian road

The US space agency has said its Mars rover appears to be working “flawlessly,” with a lengthy period of instrument checks almost complete. The Curiosity rover will soon re-start its sluggish search for signs of life. NASA’s Mars rover, “Curiosity,” will wrap up a lengthy self-testing phase on Thursday, freeing it up to continue exploring […]
The US space agency has said its Mars rover appears to be working “flawlessly,” with a lengthy period of instrument checks almost complete. The Curiosity rover will soon re-start its sluggish search for signs of life.
NASA’s Mars rover, “Curiosity,” will wrap up a lengthy self-testing phase on Thursday, freeing it up to continue exploring the surface of the Red Planet. Mission manager Jennifer Tropser told reporters in a conference call on Wednesday evening that the plan, once the final checks were completed, was to “drive, drive, drive” until Curiosity discovers a rock suitable for analysis. She added that the instrument checks have delivered positive results. “Through every phase of the check-out, Curiosity has performed almost flawlessly,” Tropser said. “The success so far of these activities has been outstanding.” Many of the tests have concerned Curiosity’s robotic arm. The 2.1-meter (7-feet) appendage will be used to pick out and sample rocks and soil. NASA is investigating whether Mars can sustain life, or whether it could in the past. The tests were designed to identify any damage sustained during its interplanetary flight and also to ensure that the arm still functioned properly on Mars, with its different temperatures and gravity. The Mars rover landed in the giant Gale Crater, near the Martian equator, on August 5; it has so far moved about 109 meters within the crater. The rover is traveling east, heading first to an intersection called Glenelg, where three types of terrain meet. This is likely to be the location for the first rock and soil samples, though NASA said Curiosity was unlikely to arrive there for several weeks. Curiosity’s ultimate destination is the nearby Aeolis Mons or Mount Sharp, a 3-mile-high mound of rock rising out of the crater. Mount Sharp is about 4.3 miles (7 kilometers) away from Curiosity’s landing site. The $2.5-billion (1.93-billion-euro) six-wheeled rolling science lab is designed to last two years in order to complete its Mars mission.


Sign Up For ATI Courses eNewsletter

Planet Mars is a piece of art! Who would have thought?

The otherworldly beauty of the surface of Mars has been captivating us for nearly for decades.  The images below provide insights into the history, climate and geology of our nearest planet. See more of the stunning Mar’s images here.
The otherworldly beauty of the surface of Mars has been captivating us for nearly for decades.  The images below provide insights into the history, climate and geology of our nearest planet.
Taken by Mars Exploration Rover
See more of the stunning Mar’s images here.
Sign Up For ATI Courses eNewsletter

NASA repositions Mars spacecraft for direct information to earth

THE National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) NASA’s Mars Odyssey spacecraft has successfully adjusted its orbital location to be in a better position to provide prompt confirmation of the August landing of the Curiosity rover. NASA is the agency of the United States government that is responsible for the nation’s civilian space programme and for […]
THE National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) NASA’s Mars Odyssey spacecraft has successfully adjusted its orbital location to be in a better position to provide prompt confirmation of the August landing of the Curiosity rover. NASA is the agency of the United States government that is responsible for the nation’s civilian space programme and for aeronautics and aerospace research. NASA in a statement made available to The Guardian from Washington yesterday said the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) spacecraft carrying Curiosity “can send limited information directly to Earth as it enters Mars’ atmosphere.” Before the landing, Earth will set below the Martian horizon from the descending spacecraft’s perspective, ending that direct route of communication. Odyssey will help to speed up the indirect communication process. Meanwhile, for several days this month, Greenland’s surface ice cover melted over a larger area than at any time in more than 30 years of satellite observations. Nearly the entire ice cover of Greenland, from its thin, low-lying coastal edges to its two-mile-thick centre, experienced some degree of melting at its surface, according to measurements from three independent satellites analyzed by NASA and university scientists. On average in the summer, about half of the surface of Greenland’s ice sheet naturally melts. At high elevations, most of that melt water quickly refreezes in place. Near the coast, some of the melt water is retained by the ice sheet and the rest is lost to the ocean. But this year the extent of ice melting at or near the surface jumped dramatically. According to satellite data, an estimated 97 percent of the ice sheet surface thawed at some point in mid-July.


Sign Up For ATI Courses eNewsletter

Russian Mars probe lost after launch: Can $163-million probe be saved?

It has to be depressing to be a Russian space scientist interested in the Red Planet. In more than half a century, Russia has made about 20 attempts to send probes to Mars, with almost no success whatsoever. Missions have failed to get into space at all, gotten stuck in earth orbit, flown past the […]
It has to be depressing to be a Russian space scientist interested in the Red Planet. In more than half a century, Russia has made about 20 attempts to send probes to Mars, with almost no success whatsoever. Missions have failed to get into space at all, gotten stuck in earth orbit, flown past the planet instead of going into orbit, lost contact, hit the planet too hard. The closest the country came to success was in 1971, when Russia managed to land on the surface, 20 seconds after which the lander died, and in 1973, when it got an orbiting probe into a planned Martian orbit, but it died after just a few days. Now it’s looking as though the Russians may endure yet another failure. The latest mission, Phobos-Grunt is currently lost in Earth’s orbit. The experts say that the problem is with the software.  If it is the case, there is a good chance of uploading some new commands and getting the mission back on track and on its way to Mars. If there is a problem with the hardware itself, however, the mission will probably be a failure.


Sign Up For ATI Courses eNewsletter

How would you like to go to Mars?

US space transport company Space Exploration Technologies Corp. (SpaceX) announced Thursday that it plans to develop a fully reusable orbital launch system, with the goal of one day helping humans settle on Mars. The vehicle would be a reusable version of the Falcon 9 rocket which SpaceX used to propel its Dragon space capsule to […]
US space transport company Space Exploration Technologies Corp. (SpaceX) announced Thursday that it plans to develop a fully reusable orbital launch system, with the goal of one day helping humans settle on Mars. The vehicle would be a reusable version of the Falcon 9 rocket which SpaceX used to propel its Dragon space capsule to low-Earth orbit during a test mission last year. Its first cargo trip to the International Space Station (ISS) is scheduled for January. A trip to Mars would cost about $500,000 per person, which could be affordable for at least one person in a million. If Earth’s population is 8 billion by the time a Mars mission is available, that would imply at least 8,000 people could afford the trip. Wouldn’t you like to go?
Sign Up For ATI Courses eNewsletter

Space Exploration. Where to next: Moon, Mars or Alpha Centauri?

There is a lot of debate on what should be the next step in space exploration.  Some suggest that we should go back to the Moon since 1969 moonshot resulted in a multitude of discoveries and inventions from simple tennis shoes to Teflon.  Yet others insist that Mars should be our next destination  and argue […]
There is a lot of debate on what should be the next step in space exploration.  Some suggest that we should go back to the Moon since 1969 moonshot resulted in a multitude of discoveries and inventions from simple tennis shoes to Teflon.  Yet others insist that Mars should be our next destination  and argue that it is the closest planet to us and should be explored thoroughly considering the dwindling natural resources. Yet, ATI instructor and the founder of The Tau Zero Foundation, Dr. Marc Millis, insists that we should strive to develop new technologies that will allow the humanity to travel outside our solar system.   This is a complex task that will involve anti matter, artificial gravity and hibernation. What is your opinion?  Please comment below… Dr. Millis teaches the following ATI courses: Managing Disruptive Research Frontiers Of Propulsion Science


Sign Up For ATI Courses eNewsletter