ATI Releases New Radar Systems Analysis & Design Using MATLAB Technical Training Short Course Sampler

On March 15, 2011 ATI released new Radar Systems Analysis & Design Using MATLAB technical training short course sampler. ATI’s Radar Systems Analysis & Design using MATLAB Technical Training Short Course Sampler View more presentations from Jim Jenkins This course provides a comprehensive description of radar systems analyses and design. A design case study is […]
On March 15, 2011 ATI released new Radar Systems Analysis & Design Using MATLAB technical training short course sampler.
    This course provides a comprehensive description of radar systems analyses and design. A design case study is introduced and as the material coverage progresses throughout the course, and new theory is presented, requirements for this design case study are changed and / or updated, and the design level of complexity is also increased. This design process is supported with a comprehensive set of MATLAB-7 code developed for this purpose. By the end, a comprehensive design case study is accomplished. This will serve as a valuable tool to radar engineers in helping them understand radar systems design process. Each student will receive the instructor’s textbook MATLAB Simulations for Radar Systems Design as well as course notes.
    The course is scheduled to be presented on May 2-5, 2011 in Columbia, MD.  Register here.


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      ATI Releases new Radar Signal Analysis and Processing using MATLAB Technical Training Short Course Sampler

      On March 16, 2011 ATI released new Radar Signal Analysis and Processing using MATLAB technical training short course sampler. ATI’s Radar Signal Analysis and Processing using MATLAB Technical Training Short Course Sampler View more presentations from Jim Jenkins This three-day course develops the technical background needed to predict and understand the factors controlling the performance […]
      On March 16, 2011 ATI released new Radar Signal Analysis and Processing using MATLAB technical training short course sampler.
        This three-day course develops the technical background needed to predict and understand the factors controlling the performance of radar systems including anti-clutter and anti-jamming signal processing techniques.The course introduces the fundamental concepts and properties of various techniques without the necessity of a detailed analytic background. The course is scheduled to be presented on July 13-15, 2011 in Laurel, MD.  Register here.


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      ATI Releases Grounding & Shielding for EMC Technical Training Short Course Sampler

      On March 15, 2011 ATI released Grounding & Shielding for EMC technical training short course sampler. ATI’s Grounding and Shielding for EMC Technical Training Short Course Sampler This three-day course is designed for technicians, operators, and engineers who need an understanding of all facets of grounding and shielding at the circuit, PCB, box or equipment […]
      On March 15, 2011 ATI released Grounding & Shielding for EMC technical training short course sampler.
      ATI’s Grounding and Shielding for EMC Technical Training Short Course Sampler
        This three-day course is designed for technicians, operators, and engineers who need an understanding of all facets of grounding and shielding at the circuit, PCB, box or equipment level, cable-interconnected boxes (subsystem), system and building, facilities or vehicle levels. The course offers a discussion of the qualitative techniques for EMI control through grounding and shielding at all levels. It provides for selection of EMI suppression methods via math modeling and graphics of grounding and shielding parameters.Our instructor will use computer software to provide real world examples and case histories. The computer software simulates and demonstrates various concepts and helps bridge the gap between theory and the real world. The computer software will be made available to the attendees. One of the computer programs is used to design interconnecting equipments. This program demonstrates the impact of various grounding schemes and different “fixes” that are applied. Another computer program is used to design a shielded enclosure. The program considers the box material; seams and gaskets; cooling and viewing apertures; and various “fixes” that may be used for aperture protection. . There are also hardware demonstrations of the effect of various compromises and resulting “fixes” on the shielding effectiveness of an enclosure. The compromises that are demonstrated are seam leakage, and a conductor penetrating the enclosure. The hardware demonstrations also include incorporating various “fixes” and illustrating their impact.
      The course is scheduled to be presented on April 26-28, 2011 in Columbia, MD. Register here.


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      UFO Landing From Space Or Giant Ice Circles

      On Tuesday, January 11, 2011 ATI staff noticed a change in our view of giant ice circles on the surface of  Beards Creek in Riva, MD. Under a light cover of snow they looked even more surreal. As we discussed in the previous post ice circles are a rare phenomenon and we at ATI feel privileged to […]
      On Tuesday, January 11, 2011 ATI staff noticed a change in our view of giant ice circles on the surface of  Beards Creek in Riva, MD. Under a light cover of snow they looked even more surreal. As we discussed in the previous post ice circles are a rare phenomenon and we at ATI feel privileged to have witnessed it.

      ATI Staff witnesses mysterious ice circles on Beards Creek in Riva, MD

      On Monday, January 10, 2011 ATI staff came in to work to discover that the view out of their windows has changed dramatically.  One of the perks of working at Applied Technology Institute is the expansive views of the Beards Creek and South River.  However, what we saw that morning was entirely different.  The surface […]
      On Monday, January 10, 2011 ATI staff came in to work to discover that the view out of their windows has changed dramatically.  One of the perks of working at Applied Technology Institute is the expansive views of the Beards Creek and South River.  However, what we saw that morning was entirely different.  The surface of the water was covered in large ice circles 4-6 ft. in diameter. As it turns out, an ice disc, ice circle, or ice pan is a natural phenomenon that occurs in slow moving water in cold climates. Ice circles vary in size but have been reported to be more than 4 metres (13 ft) in diameter. Ice discs form on the outer bends in a river where the accelerating water creates a force called ‘rotational shear’, which breaks off a chunk of ice and twists it around.[5] As the disc rotates, it grinds against surrounding ice — smoothing into a circle. A relatively uncommon phenomenon, one of the earliest recordings is of a slowly revolving disc was spotted on the Mianus River and reported in a 1895 edition of Scientific American. River specialist and geography professor Joe Desloges states that ice pans are “surface slabs of ice that form in the center of a lake or creek, instead of along the water’s edge. As water cools, it releases heat that turns into frazil ice” that can cluster together into a pan-shaped formation. If an ice pan accumulates enough frazil ice and the current remains slow, the pan may transform into a ‘hanging dam’, a heavy block of ice with high ridges low centre.

      Low Frequency Home Noise Continued – Another Expert Opinion – Understand How The Noise Is Getting Into The House

      See the previous post from Carolyn about low frequency noise in her home that bothers her sleep and living. Jim, There may be a question about how the noise is getting into the house, whether by airborne transmission of noise outside or ground borne vibration into the structure of the house with noise radiation due […]
      See the previous post from Carolyn about low frequency noise in her home that bothers her sleep and living. Jim, There may be a question about how the noise is getting into the house, whether by airborne transmission of noise outside or ground borne vibration into the structure of the house with noise radiation due to floor/wall vibration. Carolyn said they hear the noise inside but not outside which would suggest that it is ground borne. Also, there are train tracks in the area that where the locomotives sit idling all night. These could be a source of both airborne noise and ground borne vibration at low frequencies. If the problem involves ground borne transmission then modifying the windows will not do much as the path does not involve transmission through the windows. Also, are the vibration at levels sufficient to be feelable by the inhabitants? It would be good if measurements could be carried out to reliably determine whether the transmission is airborne or ground borne. At a minimum, measurements are needed to monitor actual levels of noise inside and outside the house to determine a frequency spectrum of the noise and to establish a correlation between outside and inside levels when the noise occurs. It would be good also to monitor floor or wall vibration levels along with ground vibration levels outside around the house. These measurements would quantify how the noise is getting into the house as a basis for deciding how best to approach reducing it. The suggestion about adding a second pane to the windows should help if the transmission is airborne and the windows are the weak link in blocking transmission through the outer walls of the house – brick should be heavy enough for the solid walls, leaving the windows and possibly the doors. Dealing with ground borne transmission would be more complicated as decoupling the foundation and structure of the house from ground borne vibration transmission is not easy. In non-engineering terms, have the people been in the house for a while?, is this a new problem that developed recently?? Your wondering about contacting someone in public administration about local noise standards is good. Also, are there neighbors with the same issues that could be brought into the pursuit of a solution? We often have community noise problems where a group of neighbors are involved in seeking solutions with the offending company, who is often willing to pursue a solution to maintain good community relations and may be willing to pay to develop a solution. I would be willing to communicate or talk with Carolyn directly about the problem. We are consultants but would be willing to discuss things in a preliminary fashion. Jim Moore

      Space Solar Power – EADS plans to launch a test satellite with solar panels.

      It is a known fact that alternative energy sources — coal, oil shale, ethanol, wind and ground-based solar — are either of limited potential, very expensive, require huge energy storage systems or harm the environment. There is, however, one potential future energy source that is environmentally friendly, has essentially unlimited potential and can be cost […]
      It is a known fact that alternative energy sources — coal, oil shale, ethanol, wind and ground-based solar — are either of limited potential, very expensive, require huge energy storage systems or harm the environment. There is, however, one potential future energy source that is environmentally friendly, has essentially unlimited potential and can be cost competitive with any renewable source: space solar power.

      A space solar power system would involve building large solar energy collectors in orbit around the Earth. These panels would collect far more energy than land-based units, which are hampered by weather, low angles of the sun in northern climes and, of course, the darkness of night.

      Once collected, the solar energy would be safely beamed to Earth via wireless radio transmission, where it would be received by antennas near cities and other places where large amounts of power are used. The received energy would then be converted to electric power for distribution over the existing grid.

      Watch this video to see STRATFOR’s founder and CEO, George Friedman, discuss the push for space-based energy infrastructure after EADS, Europe’s largest space company, announces plans to launch a test satellite with solar panels.

      ATI Addresses 60 Minutes Special on Cyber Warfare

      Last night 60 Minutes on CBS reported on the very real and escalating threat of cyber warfare attacks. Interviews included top experts in national security, Mike McConnell, former vice admiral in the U.S. Navy and former Director of the National Security Agency, as well as Jim Lewis, Director at the Center for Strategic and International […]
      Last night 60 Minutes on CBS reported on the very real and escalating threat of cyber warfare attacks. Interviews included top experts in national security, Mike McConnell, former vice admiral in the U.S. Navy and former Director of the National Security Agency, as well as Jim Lewis, Director at the Center for Strategic and International Studies, and Sandia’s James Gossler, a leading authority on cyber warfare strategies. They each emphasized the United States vulnerability to cyber warfare attacks, revealing serious breaches in both the government and private sector, affecting financial institutions, energy and transportation infrastructures and national security computers.

      Watch the 60 minutes video now. ATI’s new course, Theory and Fundamentals of Cyber Warfare is offered January 19-20 in Beltsville, MD. Seats are going quickly.

      Register today to reserve your seat.

      The Applied Technology Institute (ATI) announces a new two-day professional development short course, Theory and Fundamentals of Cyber Warfare, offered to the public on Jan 19-20, 2010 in Beltsville, Maryland. The course is offered in response to the growing need for businesses and military facilities to quickly gain an understanding of cyber threats and institute cyber security defenses. It is targeted especially to DoD analysts, specialists and engineers in security related facilities in the Washington, DC, Virginia and Maryland metro area, which has the largest concentration of DoD national security related facilities in the United States. Those facilities, along with the research and development contractors they work with, are building their resources to tackle the growing need for cyber security experts.

      Cyber Warfare is all over news headlines. World leaders, including the United States, Russia, South Korea and Great Britain, are scrambling to organize against the rapidly increasing varieties of threats such as spyware and malware, spoofing, phishing and botnets that are having devastating effects around the world. Digital intelligence experts have labeled these escalating cyber threats as a “Global Cyber Cold War”.

      The instructor for ATI’s new Theory and Fundamentals of Cyber Warfare course is Albert Kinney, who brings more than 20 years of experience in research and operational cyberspace mission areas including the initial development and first operational employment of the Naval Cyber Attack Team. Kinney says, “ I designed the course to focus on providing a top-down view of both the challenges and opportunities encountered in this new warfare domain. Attendees will gain insight to emerging requirements and trends affecting the implementation of cyber warfare systems, policy, and operations that will inform your strategy and focus your efforts in cyberspace.”

      Maryland Governor, Martin O’Malley, was recently interviewed on 103.5 FM WTOP radio identifying Maryland as the next, “silicon valley” of cyber security. “Cyberspace has emerged as a mainstream warfare domain on par with air, land, sea, and space domains. This advancement to a bona fide battle space arises from the de facto behaviors of entities ranging from international superpowers to improvised non-state organizations. As a result, government and military organizations are developing new doctrines, establishing domain-focused operational hierarchies, and acquiring new systems capabilities to maintain cyberspace as a viable resource serving the national interest,” Kinney explains.

      The topic of cyber security first gained momentum when President Obama announced in May that his administration will pursue a plan to secure America’s digital infrastructure and that, “Protecting this infrastructure will be a national security priority.” The President’s plan will involve nearly all sectors of local and national government and military.

      Prospective attendees can view the full Theory and Fundamentals of Cyber Warfare course description by clicking on: http://www.aticourses.com/theory_fundamentals_cyber_warfare.html The Applied Technology Institute (ATI) specializes in professional development seminars in the technical areas of space, communications, defense, sonar, radar, and signal processing. For over twenty-five years, ATI has presented leading-edge technical training to defense and NASA facilities, as well as DoD and aerospace contractors. ATI courses provide a clear understanding of the fundamental principles and a working knowledge of current technology and applications. ATI has the unique capability to schedule and deliver courses in a matter of weeks. They offer customized on-site training at your facility anywhere in the United States, as well as internationally and over 200 annual public courses in dozens of locations. World-class design experts lead courses. To register or for an on-site quote, call (888) 501-2100, or visit them on the web at www.ATIcourses.com

      New ATI Course Demystifies Satellite Service Requirements for Government Agencies

      (September, 2009, Riva Maryland) The Applied Technology Institute (ATIcourses.com) has introduced a new three-day short-course, Communications Payload Design–Satellite System Architecture, scheduled Nov 10-12, 2009 in Beltsville, MD. The new course is apropos to the U.S. Federal Government’s recent announcement that they will be appropriating $5 billion for the Federal Commercial Satellite Communications Service Acquisition (FCSA) […]
      (September, 2009, Riva Maryland) The Applied Technology Institute (ATIcourses.com) has introduced a new three-day short-course, Communications Payload Design–Satellite System Architecture, scheduled Nov 10-12, 2009 in Beltsville, MD. The new course is apropos to the U.S. Federal Government’s recent announcement that they will be appropriating $5 billion for the Federal Commercial Satellite Communications Service Acquisition (FCSA) program. The FCSA program will replace several existing programs, streamlining satellite service acquisitions by allowing government agencies access to a wider choice of vendors, services and products, while speeding up the overall procurement process.

      Satellite Communications expert, Bruce R. Elbert, with forty years of combined experience designing satellite communications payload and systems for COMSAT Laboratories and Hughes Electronics, will lead the course, which he says will be essential for government agencies. “Effective satellite communication depends on a clear understanding of the user requirements, including what information is to be communicated, where it must be communicated, and finally, how the unique situation of the user can be addressed (things such as whether the user is stationary or in motion on the ground, in the air or on the sea). There are a myriad of questions to be answered but there are solutions on the market that can potentially address them. Getting through this maze requires a good understanding of the alternative satellite capabilities, kinds of user terminals available, network architectures, and systems engineering processes.”

      The Communications Payload Design–Satellite System Architecture course is designed to outline in detail the technical characteristics of a wide variety of satellites operating in different frequency bands, exploring the advantages and limitations of each, such as Lockheed Martin’s, Advanced Extremely High Frequency (AEHF) satellite. Elbert demonstrates this point explaining, “The military relies on mobility to extend and conduct operations in a wide variety of places. The system provided by Inmarsat would seem to be ideal because the user antennas are small and the network service is quite versatile, being IP based. However, the bandwidth afforded is low relative to many requirements and the cost per MByte is quite high as compared to, say, Ku band satellite services. Alternatively, Ku band is very popular because it addresses these issues, but the availability of Ku satellites is somewhat less and the attendant user antennas tend to be much larger. They also must be pointed rather accurately at the particular satellite in use, a challenge for moving vehicles,” he says.

      Prospective end-users of the course are not limited to military and government audiences. It also provides knowledge and methodologies to use satellite communications for non-government applications in field such as oil and gas exploration and production, emergency management, transportation and broadcasting.

      The Applied Technology Institute (ATI) specializes in professional development seminars in the technical areas of space, communications, defense, sonar, radar, and signal processing. For over twenty-five years, ATI has presented leading-edge technical training to defense and NASA facilities, as well as DOD and aerospace contractors. Their courses provide a clear understanding of the fundamental principles and a working knowledge of current technology and applications. ATI has the unique capability to schedule and deliver courses in a matter of weeks. They provide customized on-site training at your facility anywhere in the United States as well as internationally and offer over 200 annual public courses in dozens of locations. World-class design experts lead courses. To register for a course or request an on-site quote, call (410) 956-8805 or (888) 501-2100 or visit them on the web at http://www.aticourses.com/

      War Over The Whales: The Navy insists underwater warfare range won’t hurt rare right whales off Florida coast

      Miami Herald September 10, 2009 By Curtis Morgan Every winter endangered North Atlantic right whales migrate to warm, shallow waters to give birth and nurse their young. That’s right next to where the U.S. Navy wants to conduct antisubmarine training. Florida isn’t known for whale watching, but every winter the coastline offers a haven for […]
      Miami Herald September 10, 2009 By Curtis Morgan Every winter endangered North Atlantic right whales migrate to warm, shallow waters to give birth and nurse their young. That’s right next to where the U.S. Navy wants to conduct antisubmarine training. Florida isn’t known for whale watching, but every winter the coastline offers a haven for endangered North Atlantic right whales. They migrate to warm, shallow waters to give birth and nurse little — relatively speaking — one-ton bundles of blubber. That’s right next to where the U.S. Navy wants to conduct antisubmarine training. The Navy has selected a site bordering a federally protected whale nursery stretching from Savannah to Sebastian for an undersea warfare range, where ships, submarines and aircraft outfitted with powerful sonar can practice hunting subs. Citing voluminous studies, the Navy concluded that training 58 miles off Jacksonville would rarely, and barely, disturb right whales. Environmentalists say the Navy has soft-pedaled risks from the 500-square-mile range. Ship strikes already rank as the top right whale killer. The Navy also intends to heavily employ sonar that can disrupt feeding and communication, cause hearing damage and — in extreme cases — trigger mass strandings such as one in the Bahamas that killed six beaked whales in 2000. “It’s one of the worst possible places,” said Catherine Wannamaker, an attorney for the Southern Environmental Law Center, one of 21 groups that contested the choice. “It’s right next to the calving grounds for one of the rarest whales in the world.” The groups contend that the range poses a disruptive, potentially deadly threat to a whale population numbering no more than 400 — and that’s after producing 39 calves last year, the most in decades. Florida and Georgia environmental regulators have raised similar concerns. Navy is moving ahead because Florida’s location and logistics beat sites off South Carolina, North Carolina and Maryland. Jacksonville boasts a seaport, air base and submarine base across the St. Mary’s River in King’s Bay, Ga. The Navy already has a deep-water sonar range in the Bahamas, but Julie Ripley, the Navy’s environmental spokeswoman, said the shallow sea floor and busy shipping lanes off northeast Florida provide a real-world test for sonar operators who must pinpoint a new generation of stealthier subs. Environmentalists, who have been battling the Navy for years over sonar, argue that it’s the whales that are perishable. Though there are signs of slow recovery, scientists consider their future precarious. The whales take a decade to hit sexual maturity. Females produce one calf a year, so losing one prematurely can set back recovery. Ship strikes are such a serious concern — 22 whales were hit between 1999 and 2006, with 13 confirmed deaths — that the fisheries service last year imposed seasonal zones limiting large vessels to 10 knots in whale habitat. The Navy — involved in roughly one-sixth of 134 documented strikes over 60 years — was exempted. Factoring in total sea hours, the service calculated the chance of any Navy ship hitting a whale in any year at .0000472 percent. The chances of not doing it: 99.99 percent. While whales have been spotted 60 miles out where the range is planned, past surveys — which environmentalists consider inadequate — suggest that most swim relatively close to shore, some 30 miles from where the Navy plans to train. The Navy, which adopted whale-avoidance policies in 2002, also has proposed more precautions during calving season — posted lookouts, daytime training and exercising “extreme caution” in ship speed and sonar power. But environmentalists remain skeptical, pointing to a series of strikes that have killed whales since 2000, including six pregnant females. Then there is the complex question of sonar. For the Navy, it’s critical protection for military vessels and shipping lanes — particularly mid-frequency active systems that emit “pings” of powerful sound, measuring echoes to identify and track targets. There is no dispute that active sonar can disturb whales and dolphins. They rely on echolocation, their own internal sonar, to navigate and hunt, and use an array of calls or “songs” to communicate. But research — much of it bankrolled by $20 million a year from the Navy — shows widely varying impacts, depending on species and sonar levels. Animals can leave an area, possibly under stress, or abandon feeding or breeding. Some studies indicate that repeated exposure can cause temporary hearing loss. In the worst cases, fleeing whales and dolphins beach in mass, often fatal, strandings. The Navy, in a 2001 study after 17 whales and a dolphin beached in the Bahamas, acknowledged that its mid-frequency sonar played a role, but also pointed to an unusual confluence of other factors. Necropsies of whales that beached in the Canary Islands in 2002 during international naval exercises showed brain hemorrhages, vascular ruptures and lung congestion. One theory is that they bolt from depths so quickly their organs can’t handle rapid pressure changes — akin to the “bends,” or embolisms that divers suffer when surfacing too quickly. As a concession to state concerns, the Navy agreed not to lay fiber-optic cable and transducers during calving season, which runs from mid-November to mid-April. Wannamaker said it would resolve many concerns if the Navy made the same pledge for sonar training. The Navy responded that option has “been given consideration” but that they want to retain “flexibility.” Wannamaker said the groups are pondering a lawsuit, not trusting that more studies and surveys will sway the final decision. “Once you build a $100 million project,” she said, “nobody is going to tell them they can’t use it.” Full story here.