Would You Like To Listen To The Deep Ocean? Here is your chance.

The underwater environment of the world’s oceans is fill with a variety of sounds.  Most aquatic animals use sound for communications between members of their species.  The reason for all this cacophony is that sounds propagates well in water and covers longer distances. The advance of modern technology causes the increase in anthropogenic sources of sound […]
The following image shows an overview of dolphin presence at the ANTARES observatory during May 2010. In this case the indicator measures the strength of whistle content found in the acoustic data.
The underwater environment of the world’s oceans is fill with a variety of sounds.  Most aquatic animals use sound for communications between members of their species.  The reason for all this cacophony is that sounds propagates well in water and covers longer distances. The advance of modern technology causes the increase in anthropogenic sources of sound that affects the marine life.  There are multiple cases of whales beaching themselves that were recorded in recent years.  On the occasions listed below testing of mid-frequency to low-frequency active sonar was conducted in the area.
  • 1996: 12 Cuvier’s beaked whales beached in Greece
  • 1999: 4 beaked whales beached in the US Virgin Islands
  • 2000: 3 beaked whales beached in Madeira
  • 2002: 14 different whales beached in the Canary Islands
  At best, the whales hear the “clicks” and change their hunting grounds not returning to the same spot for a few years.  There is also evidence that they change their “song” and make it louder. This causes a lot of concern to the marine biologists around the world.  A new project called LIDO or “Listening to the Deep Ocean environment” has emerged recently.  It proposes to establish a first nucleus of a regional network of multidisciplinary seafloor observatories contributing to the coordination of high quality research in the ESONET NoE by allowing the long-term monitoring of Geohazards and Marine Ambient Noise in the Mediterranean Sea and the adjacent Atlantic waters.     You can listen to the marine sounds around the world on their site.  Please click on the link below.  This is quite a unique experience to be able to hear underwater sounds across the globe. http://www.listentothedeep.com/acoustics/index2.php?web=lidoearth&lang=en If you  wish to enhance your understanding of the underlying principles of underwater and engineering acoustics needed to evaluate the impact of anthropogenic noise on marine life, please attend ATI’s Underwater Acoustics for Biologists and Conservation Managers course that will be presented on October 17-20, 2011 in Seattle, WA.
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