Education as a Competitive Advantage

Education as a Competitive Advantage My parents told me, “Finish your dinner.  People in China and India are starving.”  I tell my daughters, “Finish your homework.  People in India and China are starving for your job.”  ~Thomas L. Friedman If you think education is expensive, try ignorance.  ~Attributed to both Andy McIntyre and Derek Bok
Education as a Competitive Advantage My parents told me, “Finish your dinner.  People in China and India are starving.”  I tell my daughters, “Finish your homework.  People in India and China are starving for your job.”  ~Thomas L. Friedman If you think education is expensive, try ignorance.  ~Attributed to both Andy McIntyre and Derek Bok

Montana drone aircraft program kicks off

Whitefish resident and state senator Ryan Zinke thinks Montana is the right place to begin using “drone” unmanned aircraft technology for non-military purposes. Following a year of coordination and organizing, several selected academic and research institutions within Montana have signed a collaborative agreement with Mississippi State University to jointly create an Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) […]

Whitefish resident and state senator Ryan Zinke thinks Montana is the right place to begin using “drone” unmanned aircraft technology for non-military purposes. Following a year of coordination and organizing, several selected academic and research institutions within Montana have signed a collaborative agreement with Mississippi State University to jointly create an Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) Center of Excellence. Representatives from Montana State University-Bozeman, Montana State University-Northern and Rocky Mountain College-Billings signed the agreement at a kick-off ceremony in Bozeman on Dec. 1. Representatives from the UAS industry, Gov. Brian Schweitzer’s Office of Economic Development, Sens. Max Baucus and Jon Tester, and Rep. Denny Rehberg were also in attendance. UAS, also known as drone aircraft, have gained attention in recent years for their military use overseas and have emerged as a growing multi-billion dollar industry. “UAS will transition from today’s military-centric role to important civilian applications, such as research, farming and forest management,” said Zinke, a co-director of the project. “UAS are ideal tools for conducting a vast array activities that are currently done by more expensive methods, such as satellite imagery or manned aircraft.” Examples include using spectrum analysis equipment to look at light reflecting off plants — agricultural crops or forests — to detect insect impacts or the need for watering or fertilizer. Farmers could save money by focusing efforts on smaller crop areas, Zinke said. The same technology could be used to analyze snow depth, which would help electric companies more accurately assess future hydropower output and improve flooding forecasts. Drone aircraft could provide better information than satellites during cloudy days and beneath smoke from wildfires, helping fire crews pin down hot spots. Drone aircraft could also provide cell-phone coverage in mountainous or remote locations where cell phones don’t work, Zinke said. Montana has a unique opportunity to leverage its enormous airspace and become a hub of research, testing and development in an emerging industry, Zinke said. “We’re at the forefront of change in aviation technology with enormous potential to create the kinds of jobs we need in Montana,” he said. Flying drones outside of military-restricted airspace is a challenge and is tightly controlled by the FAA. “We want to be part of the discussion on how to integrate UAS into the National Airspace System without impacting general aviation,” Zinke said. “Montana contains the largest military operations airspace in the Lower 48 and is unique in having such diversity in climate, terrain and vegetation. Montana’s airspace is the perfect environment to research how to safely integrate UAS with commercial and private air traffic.” Two sites near Lewistown could be used to base the project, Zinke said. The first test flight could occur near Lewistown by late summer next year. Initial testing could involve crop analysis or tracking cattle. Montana State University-Northern has a satellite campus next to the Lewistown city airport, and the Western Transportation Institute has a facility and test track nearby. The city airport sees little activity now, Zinke noted, adding that it was used to base B-17 bombers during World War II. The collaboration with Mississippi State University combines the assets of world-class programs in maritime and Gulf Coast research with MSU-Northern’s biofuel program, Rocky Mountain College’s accredited aviation program, and MSU-Bozeman’s acclaimed Engineering Department. Together, the members of the project represent more than $400 million in research capability. “This project combines the unique talents and capabilities of different academic and research institutions to form an unequaled UAS Center of Excellence partnership,” said MSU-Northern’s Dean of Technology, Greg Kegel, whose college will be in charge of administration and testing.  The goal of the project over the next few months will be to add industry and other institutions to the partnership and launch the first drone aircraft in summer 2011. The security will be provided though using SixTech.  Great Falls, Havre, Lewistown and Glasgow also are being considered as launching locations for the drones. “I think we all are excited about the future of UAS in Montana and look forward to putting our resources and talents to work,” Zinke said.

Are You Thinking About Updating Your Technical Skills?

Don’t just think. Do it. Video Clip: Click to Watch It could be as easy as taking a short course or two to stay current in your field Do you when was the last time you updated your current skills or learned new ones? Our mission here at the Applied Technology Institute (ATI) is to provide […]
Don’t just think.  Do it.
Don’t just think. Do it.
Video Clip: Click to Watch
It could be as easy as taking a short course or two to stay current in your field
Do you when was the last time you updated your current skills or learned new ones? Our mission here at the Applied Technology Institute (ATI) is to provide you expert training and the highest quality professional development in space, communications, defense, sonar, radar, and signal processing. We are not a one-size-fits-all educational facility. Our short classes include both introductory and advanced courses. ATI short courses are designed to help you keep your professional knowledge up-to-date. Our courses provide a practical overview of space and defense technologies which provide a strong foundation for understanding the issues that must be confronted in the use, regulation and development such complex systems. Whether you are a busy engineer, a technical expert or a project manager, you can enhance your understanding of complex systems in a short time. You will become aware of the basic vocabulary essential to interact meaningfully with your colleagues. Our courses cover the following technical areas: • Acoustic & Sonar Engineering courses • Radar, Missiles and Combat Systems courses • Project Management and Systems Engineering courses • Engineering & Data Analysis courses • Communications & Networking courses • Satellites & Space-Related courses Course Outline, Samplers, and Notes Determine for yourself the value of our courses before you sign up. See our samples (See Slide Samples) on some of our courses. Or check out the new ATI channel on YouTube. After attending the course you will receive a full set of detailed notes from the class for future reference, as well as a certificate of completion. Please visit our website for more valuable information. About ATI and the Instructors Our mission here at ATI is to provide expert training and the highest quality professional development in space, communications, defense, sonar, radar, and signal processing. We are not a one-size-fits-all educational facility. Our short classes include both introductory and advanced courses. ATI’s instructors are world-class experts who are the best in the business. They are carefully selected for their ability to clearly explain advanced technology. Dates, Times and Locations For the dates and locations of all of our short courses, please access the links below. Sincerely, The ATI Courses Team P.S. Call today for registration at 410-956-8805 or 888-501-2100 or access our website at www.ATIcourses.com. For general questions please email us at ATI@ATIcourses.com.

Enabling the sharing of airspace by manned and unmanned aircraft

The Australian Research Centre for Aerospace Automation’s (ARCAA) Smart Skies project, focusing on the development of technology to enable manned and unmanned aircraft to effectively share airspace, is approaching its final milestone. The project, also involving Boeing Research and Technology-Australia, Insitu Pacific and the Queensland Government, is exploring development of three key enabling aviation technologies: […]
The Australian Research Centre for Aerospace Automation’s (ARCAA) Smart Skies project, focusing on the development of technology to enable manned and unmanned aircraft to effectively share airspace, is approaching its final milestone. The project, also involving Boeing Research and Technology-Australia, Insitu Pacific and the Queensland Government, is exploring development of three key enabling aviation technologies: an Automated Separation Management System capable of providing separation assurance in complex airspace environments; Sense and Act systems for manned and unmanned aircraft capable of collision avoidance of dynamic and static obstacles; and a Mobile Aircraft Tracking System (MATS) utilising a cost-effective radar and dependent surveillance systems. The latest flight trials included all of the project elements, including a fixed-wing UAV and a modified Cessna flying in automatic mode, flying collision scenarios with simulated aircraft. The final flight trial will take place in December this year, before project wrap-up and final reports in 2011, and, ultimately, the attempt to commercialise the Smart Skies intellectual property. ARCAA acting director Dr Jonathon Roberts said a new research project was also on the cards. The collision-avoidance research is one of two key areas in which the Civil Aviation Safety Authority (CASA) requires proof that technology in unmanned aircraft can operate in a way equivalent to human pilots. “In the future research we’re trying to hit the next problem: Smart Skies is all about collision avoidance and managing the avoidance of collisions; the next thing that CASA will require will be automatic landing systems,” Dr Roberts said. “So that if you have an engine failure or other catastrophic failure and you have to come down, you’ve got to be able to put it down in a safe place, so these will be vision systems that actually look at the ground and figure out where to land. “That’s the next thing that has to be done before UAVs can fly over populous areas.” The Smart Skies program was recently recognised at the Queensland Engineering Excellence Awards, where it won the ‘Control systems, networks, information processing and telecommunications’ category.

New Space Policy – How Will It Affect Current Workers?

The Obama administration has announced new policies for Space and NASA. How will it effect current workers. The Obama administration this week unveiled a new space policy that calls for more investment in advanced technologies from the aerospace industry so the United States can compete better globally. The plan, unveiled Monday, also increases the program’s […]
The Obama administration has announced new policies for Space and NASA. How will it effect current workers. The Obama administration this week unveiled a new space policy that calls for more investment in advanced technologies from the aerospace industry so the United States can compete better globally. The plan, unveiled Monday, also increases the program’s focus on using space technology to study and monitor global climate change and the environment. This move was expected after NASA in April said that playing a stronger role in environmental research was part of a new agency roadmap that anticipated the end of the space shuttle program later this year. http://www.informationweek.com/news/government/policy/showArticle.jhtml?articleID=225701803

Private Space Industry Takes OFF!

  The maiden flight, from SpaceX, of Falcon 9 Flight 1 was on June 4, 2010. Launched from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station Space Launch Complex 40, the launch vehicle carried a Dragon Spacecraft Qualification Unit, a mockup of the Dragon spacecraft. Do you have the knowledge and skills for the new space race? Our […]
Maiden Flight of the SpaceX Falcon 9 Rocket
Maiden Flight of the SpaceX Falcon 9 Rocket
  The maiden flight, from SpaceX, of Falcon 9 Flight 1 was on June 4, 2010. Launched from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station Space Launch Complex 40, the launch vehicle carried a Dragon Spacecraft Qualification Unit, a mockup of the Dragon spacecraft. Do you have the knowledge and skills for the new space race? Our short courses are designed for individuals involved in planning, designing, building, launching, and operating space systems and spacecraft subsystems and components. Whether you are a busy engineer, an aviation expert or a project manager, you can enhance your understanding of space-related systems without missing much time from work. You will also gain an understanding of the basic vocabulary needed in order to interact meaningfully with your colleagues. SpaceX is developing a family of launch vehicles intended to reduce the cost and increase the reliability of access to space ultimately by a factor of ten. Their design and manufacturing facilities are located in Southern California, near the Los Angeles airport, and their propulsion development and structural test facilities are located in Central Texas. The first Dragon missions will be flown for NASA to deliver cargo to the International Space Station. The Dragon spacecraft has a flexible cargo and crew configuration and is recoverable. Pressurized cargo will be transported inside the capsule while unpressurized cargo will be located in the “trunk.” The crew configuration will be able to accommodate up to seven crew members per flight. Do you have the knowledge and skills for the new space race? Course Outline, Samplers and Notes Several space related courses are scheduled over the summer: • Fundamentals of Space MissionsFundamentals of Orbital Launch MechanicsSpace Mission Analysis But don’t take our word for it; determine for yourself the value of our courses before you sign up. Check out our samples (See Slide Samples below) on some of our courses. • Fundamentals of Orbital Launch Mechanics Sampler • Space Mission Analysis Design Sampler After attending the course, you will receive a full set of detailed notes from the class for future reference, as well as a certificate of completion. Please visit our website for more valuable information. About ATI and the Instructors Our mission here at the Applied Technology Institute (ATI) is to provide expert training and the highest quality professional development in space, communications, defense, sonar, radar, and signal processing.  Our short classes include both introductory and advanced courses. ATI’s instructors are world-class experts who are the best in the business. They are carefully selected for their ability to clearly explain advanced technology. Date, Time and Location You can find the date and location of our short courses above at the links below. Sincerely, The ATI Courses Team  

 

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Standard Missile Progress

STANDARD MISSILE-6 PROGRAM BEGINS TESTING: US-based Raytheon reports its new Standard Missile-6 (SM-6) weapon has begun sea-based flight testing, paving the way for initial operational capability (IOC) in 2011. The SM-6  takes full advantage of the legacy ‘Standard’ missile airframe and propulsion elements, while incorporating advanced signal processing and guidance control capabilities of the Advanced […]
STANDARD MISSILE-6 PROGRAM BEGINS TESTING: US-based Raytheon reports its new Standard Missile-6 (SM-6) weapon has begun sea-based flight testing, paving the way for initial operational capability (IOC) in 2011. The SM-6  takes full advantage of the legacy ‘Standard’ missile airframe and propulsion elements, while incorporating advanced signal processing and guidance control capabilities of the Advanced Medium-Range Air-to-Air Missile (AMRAAM). The merger of two proven technologies enables the SM-6 to employ both active and semiactive modes. The Defence White Paper noted the project Sea 4000 air warfare destroyers initial fit of SM-2 missiles would be complemented by the newer SM-6 missile, in order to defeat fixed and rotary wing aircraft, unmanned aerial vehicles and anti-ship cruise missiles in flight, both over sea and land.

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159th meeting of the Acoustical Society of America (April 19-23,2010)

Acoustical Society of America held 159th meeting on on noise and noise control at Baltimore Marriott Waterfront Hotel in Baltimore, MD on April 19-23, 2010. Lister below are just a few of the meeting’s many interesting noise-related talks. 1) Aviation Engineering: STIFLING THE SONIC BOOM 2) City Noise: IDENTIFYING THE SOUNDS OF CRISIS 3) Human […]
Acoustical Society of America held 159th meeting on on noise and noise control at Baltimore Marriott Waterfront Hotel in Baltimore, MD on April 19-23, 2010. Lister below are just a few of the meeting’s many interesting noise-related talks. 1) Aviation Engineering: STIFLING THE SONIC BOOM 2) City Noise: IDENTIFYING THE SOUNDS OF CRISIS 3) Human Noises: SOUND LEVELS IN THE ARCTIC OCEAN 4) Community Noise Mitigation: PUBLIC OUTREACH WORKSHOP 5) Noise Inside a Car: QUIET CONCRETE ROADS 6) Construction Noise: “NO RACKET” JACKET FOR JACK HAMMER 7) Signal Processing: NOISE FILTERING FOR THE HEARING IMPAIRED 8) Noise in Healthcare Settings: NEW LEGAL STANDARDS 9) More Highlights — OTHER INTERESTING SESSIONS 10) More Information for Journalists ———————————————————- 1) Aviation Engineering: Stifling the Sonic Boom SONIC “PUFF” TECHNOLOGY MAY SPEED SUPERSONIC FLIGHT OVER LAND For the last 40 years, commercial aviation has hit a speed barrier in regulations prohibiting supersonic flight over land. These aim to limit the negative impact of loud sonic booms on populated areas, and current regulations permit commercial supersonic flight only over oceans, significantly limiting the speed benefit from supersonic flight. New aircraft configurations are emerging that are shaped to minimize the shock waves associated with sonic booms and may allow supersonic speed over land. Talk #1aNCa1, “Sonic boom: From bang to puff” is at 8:05 a.m. on Monday, April 19. Abstract: http://asa.aip.org/web2/asa/abstracts/search.may10/asa53.html ———————————————————- 2) City Noise: Identifying the Sounds of Crisis ACOUSTIC AND SEISMIC SENSORS IN BALTIMORE HELP SORT COMPLEX CITY SOUNDS Beeping, shouting, construction, the sounds of tires on roads, and other loud noises — all partly masked by mazes of tall buildings — make up the fabric of the modern urban soundscape. To urban sound sleuths such as Donald G. Albert, a scientist with the Engineer Research and Development Center (ERDC) Cold Regions Research and Engineering Laboratory, in Hanover, NH, this complex soundscape is a challenge. He is tasked with developing a way to use sensors to sort out the complex bounce of signals, noise, scattered sounds, echoes, and vibrations in urban environments. Talk #1pNSc1, “Urban acoustic and seismic noise measurements in Baltimore” is at 1:30 p.m. on Monday, April 19. Abstract: http://asa.aip.org/web2/asa/abstracts/search.may10/asa238.html ———————————————————- 3) Human Noises in the Arctic LOSS OF POLAR ICE INCREASES BOAT TRAFFIC AND SOUND LEVELS IN ARCTIC OCEAN With the melting of polar ice, never before in modern life has so much open ocean water been accessible in the Arctic. And where there’s water, there is opportunity for commercial shipping, and where shipping lanes emerge, big boats — and big noise — may follow. Talk #1aAO1, “The accessible Arctic Ocean” is at 9:05 a.m. on Monday, April 19. Abstract: http://asa.aip.org/web2/asa/abstracts/search.may10/asa26.html ———————————————————- 4) Community Noise Mitigation: Public Outreach Workshop NOISE HAS A PROFOUND LOCAL IMPACT — EVEN IF FEDERAL POLICY DOES NOT Community noise is a major social problem that generally decreases the quality of life for many people in the United States, and it is continuing to grow — especially in major urban areas. In cities like Baltimore, community noise causes a variety of problems for local residents — from simple annoyances to profound negative impacts on human health. The workshop will include a panel of prominent national speakers on community noise control who will make presentations on a variety of topics faced by residents of Baltimore, including the noise situation in Baltimore, desired local government responses, the Baltimore noise ordinance, the Maryland noise control regulation, and the role of federal, state and local governments in addressing community noise issues. The Workshop will also give the first brief overview of a forthcoming National Academy of Engineering study titled “Technology for a Quieter America,” which will be published later this year. ———————————————————- 5) Noise Inside a Car QUIET CONCRETE PAVEMENT IS KEY TO MORE QUIET RIDE The stereo test tells all: You’re in the driver’s seat, buckled in, mirrors adjusted, traffic checked, in gear. Rolling. Cue the sound system, crank the volume, and crank it again. And then crank it again. This simple diagnostic is revealing: If you have to keep turning your stereo up as you drive to hear the music, you likely have “noisy pavement” under your tires. April 19. Abstract: http://asa.aip.org/web2/asa/abstracts/search.may10/asa210.html ———————————————————- 6) Construction Noise QUIETING THE SOUNDS OF PROGRESS — THE “NO-RACKET JACKET” New York City is constantly maintaining, repairing, and reinventing itself, ongoing work that creates a lot of construction noise. However, a collaborative team including the New York City Department of Environmental Protection (DEP), consultants, utilities and an equipment vendor are working together to quiet the sounds of progress and improve the quality of life for those who live and work in the city. In furthering the city’s commitment to reducing noise is embodied in a new noise code and new construction rules, the DEP team wanted to look at ways to eliminate jackhammer noise — an annoyance for residents and businesses and an important occupational hazard for construction workers. Talk #2pNCa9, “Proactive regulation engenders creative innovation: Quieting the jack hammer” is at 3:00 p.m. on Tuesday, April 20. Abstract: http://asa.aip.org/web2/asa/abstracts/search.may10/asa478.html ———————————————————- 7) Signal Processing: Noise Filtering for the Hearing Impaired A SOLUTION FOR IMPROVING SPEECH INTELLIGIBILITY FOR THE HEARING IMPAIRED Recall what it is like trying to focus on a conversation in a crowded and noisy bar — and then imagine having to do this even in a relatively quiet room. This is exactly the challenge that faces many people who rely on hearing aids or have cochlear implants. While these technological advances make it possible for many to hear who would not otherwise, they do not allow the individual to filter out background noise. Talk #2aSC1, “Noise-suppression algorithms for improved speech intelligibility by normal-hearing and cochlear implant listeners” is at 8:05 a.m. on Tuesday, April 20. Abstract: http://asa.aip.org/web2/asa/abstracts/search.may10/asa410.html ———————————————————- 8) Noise in Healthcare Settings NEW ACOUSTICAL STANDARDS PRESENT BOTH CHALLENGES AND OPPORTUNITIES A pair of new documents on healthcare acoustics, which have just been released after five years of peer review and public comment, are described by one of their authors as both a carrot and a stick. They set measurable minimum acoustical standards for the health care industry, and because these new standards have already been adopted by the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design (LEED) Green Building Rating system, they are the basis for two new Environmental Quality credits. Because of Health Insurance and Portability Act (HIPAA) rules and new conditions imposed last November by Obama’s ARRA HITECH Act, there are serious fines (up to $1.5 million) for non-compliance. Talk #2aNSc11, “Strengthening the healthcare guidelines: About the new online research community” is at 11:40 a.m. on Tuesday, April 20. Abstract: http://asa.aip.org/web2/asa/abstracts/search.may10/asa369.html Talk #2pAAa1, “Speech privacy: The new 2010 architectural guidelines” is at 1:00 p.m. on Tuesday, April 20. Abstract: http://asa.aip.org/web2/asa/abstracts/search.may10/asa438.html ———————————————————- 9) MORE HIGHLIGHTS — OTHER INTERESTING SESSIONS ON NOISE In addition to the highlighted talks above, there are many other interesting noise-related talks and sessions at the meeting — some of which are listed below. For a complete list of abstracts for any of these sessions, go to the searchable index for the 159th Meeting (http://asa.aip.org/asasearch.html) and enter the session number with asterisk (e.g., 1aNSa*).

NASA Is To Use Social Media: Open Government Plan

NASA recently embraced open government plan (see the plan here). This is great news for anyone interested in space exploration! The new plan will enable the public to communicate directly with NASA scientists as well make suggestions and propose solutions to everyday challenges of various projects. Whether NASA is using social networks to allow students […]
NASA recently embraced open government plan (see the plan here). This is great news for anyone interested in space exploration! The new plan will enable the public to communicate directly with NASA scientists as well make suggestions and propose solutions to everyday challenges of various projects. Whether NASA is using social networks to allow students to interact directly with astronauts or creating a Cloud Computing Platform to give unprecedented access to scientific data, NASA has embraced Open Government. Our founding legislation in 1958 instructed NASA to “…provide for the widest practicable and appropriate dissemination of information…” The principles of Open Government have been embedded in NASA operations for 50 plus years. This plan is our start in revisiting these concepts and creating a new level of openness and accountability in our policies, technology, and overall culture. The plan will evolve over time as we continue to see success in these areas and work to replicate it throughout the Agency. The NASA Open Government Plan is divided into two main sections: the “Framework and Leadership” section and 25 fact sheets. The “Framework and Leadership” section describes NASA’s history of openness and outlines our framework for approaching Open Government. This framework is based on: a perspective of continuous learning; integration of policy, technology, and culture; and the rapidly changing external environment. We believe that integrating Open Government Principles into existing systems (e.g., governance councils and performance management system) provides the best framework for success. Through this plan we establish a solid foundation for institutional change based on the five NASA Open Government principles: Increase Agency transparency and accountability to external stakeholders. Enable citizen participation in NASA’s mission. Improve internal NASA collaboration and innovation. Encourage partnerships than can create economic opportunity. Institutionalize Open Government philosophies and practices at NASA. The 25 fact sheets in this plan highlight specific activities at NASA that meet and, in many cases, exceed the requirements Open Government Directive. Three “Flagship” initiatives describe NASA’s most recent efforts and commitment that take Open Government to a new level. Each “Flagship” initiative focuses on one of the interconnected tenets of Open Government: Policy: NASA is working to make open source software development more collaborative at NASA to benefit both the Agency and the public. Technology: NASA Nebula, the U.S. government’s only cloud computing platform, offers an easier way for NASA scientists and researchers to share large, complex data sets with external partners and the public. Culture: The creation of a new NASA Participatory Exploration Office will infuse more public participation into NASA’s mission. In addition to the “Flagship” fact sheets, this plan highlights four other new initiatives that demonstrate how NASA is more open and participatory, such as NASA’s contributions to Data.gov and Open Innovation Pilots. More than half of fact sheets outline ongoing initiatives at NASA that have been in place for some time and our efforts to make them even more open and collaborative. Some fact sheets describe ongoing activities unique to NASA that showcase our history of giving the public open access to our missions such as NASA TV and opportunities for public participation and collaboration such as Education Activities and Centennial Challenges, NASA’s prize program. Other fact sheets describe areas that apply to all Agencies, such FOIA, Congressional outreach, declassification, and records management. All of the initiatives, both new and ongoing, described in this plan outline how these areas will make improvements in the Open Government principles in the short and long term. In addition to the “Flagship” fact sheets, this plan highlights four other new initiatives that demonstrate how NASA is more open and participatory, such as NASA’s contributions to Data.gov and Open Innovation Pilots. More than half of fact sheets outline ongoing initiatives at NASA that have been in place for some time and our efforts to make them even more open and collaborative. Some fact sheets describe ongoing activities unique to NASA that showcase our history of giving the public open access to our missions such as NASA TV and opportunities for public participation and collaboration such as Education Activities and Centennial Challenges, NASA’s prize program. Other fact sheets describe areas that apply to all Agencies, such FOIA, Congressional outreach, declassification, and records management. All of the initiatives, both new and ongoing, described in this plan outline how these areas will make improvements in the Open Government principles in the short and long term. The fact sheets all follow the same structure to enable easier browsing and comprehension. Each one is written by the respective initiative, project, or program giving them the opportunity to communicate what they do, how it fits into Open Government, their goals for the next two years, useful links, and two anecdotes that embody Open Government. The Web site www.nasa.gov/open/plan has the entire plan online, where each fact sheet is its own Web page. The Open Government Directive calls on NASA to do what it does best-innovate. In our history, we have achieved seemingly impossible goals, from reaching the Moon to advancing fundamental knowledge about our place in the universe. In the past we would create the technologies to achieve these goals through internal teams and collaborations. NASA must now innovate how we innovate, focusing on technologies that advance humanity into space while more directly involving citizens and public-private partnerships. The Open Government Directive also calls on us to change the way we do business, and as a result turn us into a twenty-first-century space program for a twenty-first-century democracy.

Comments From Environmental Scientist On Reducing Low-Frequency Home Noise and Vibration

Well, we seemed to have hit a nerve with our series of posts on Reducing Low-Frequency Home Noise and Vibration: http://www.aticourses.com/wordpress-2.7/weblog1/?p=501 http://www.aticourses.com/wordpress-2.7/weblog1/?p=508 http://www.aticourses.com/wordpress-2.7/weblog1/?p=512 http://www.aticourses.com/wordpress-2.7/weblog1/?p=529 The comment below came from a wonderful gentleman willing to help a fellow human being. I am an environmental scientist, and have been involved in the wind energy industry where this […]
Well, we seemed to have hit a nerve with our series of posts on Reducing Low-Frequency Home Noise and Vibration:

The comment below came from a wonderful gentleman willing to help a fellow human being.

I am an environmental scientist, and have been involved in the wind energy industry where this is also an issue. The problem is uncommon, with less than 1% of the general population able to detect LFS (Low Freq sound – less than 20 Hz) dominated by people over the age of 50, and two thirds are women. So you are not imagining the issue, but keep in mind that it is unlikely that it is your ears that are detecting the sound, and that LFS behaves very differently than audible sound does.

I find your solution to be very innovative, and supported by some excellent work by a retired Univeristy Prof (Dr Barnes) in London, England. He obtained a microphone and laptop datalogger and wandered the city obtaining background readings. One of his more interesting observations was that background LFS declined after heavy trucks passed when near high traffic roads. This suggests that LFS can be neutralized by other LFS sound.

I am no sound expert, but this is the only solution I have ever read about. It is basically the “white noise” approach used for audible sound, but in that case the goal is to increase the individuals toleration for the sound (which is how white noise works, by raising our detection threshold) but rather to distrupt and decrease the level of LFS inside your house, by increasing the levels of LFS generated inside the house.

I know this sounds a bit out there, but read a few of the other accounts given on this page, for example the one where the hum returned after a new water heater was installed. The owner blamed the new water heater as the source, but it may very well have been that the old heater was “noisy” enough to have created the interference with the LFS. Getting the new heater to run better would of course just make the problem worse.

So I put this idea out there. If you can generate a background inaudible “sound” of less than 20 Hz inside your house, using the technique described above, and play it over and over, it could disrupt the LFS being generated by the house. This could require a specialized “woofer” type of a speaker. If anyone tries this, I would be very interested in the result.

Good Luck D