Ocean Observing Systems (OOS) and March 11, 2011 Tsunami Warnings

Ocean Observing Systems (OOS) have many sensor to detect earthquakes and tsunamis. Japan’s most powerful earthquake since records began has struck the north-east coast, triggering a massive tsunami. A massive 8.9 magnitude earthquake hit the Pacific Ocean nearby Northeastern Japan at around 2:46pm on March 11 (JST) causing damage with blackouts, fire and tsunami. Cars, […]
Ocean Observing Systems (OOS) have many sensor to detect earthquakes and tsunamis. Japan’s most powerful earthquake since records began has struck the north-east coast, triggering a massive tsunami. A massive 8.9 magnitude earthquake hit the Pacific Ocean nearby Northeastern Japan at around 2:46pm on March 11 (JST) causing damage with blackouts, fire and tsunami. Cars, ships and buildings were swept away by a wall of water after the 8.9-magnitude tremor, which struck about 400km (250 miles) north-east of Tokyo. A state of emergency has been declared at a nuclear power plant, where pressure has exceeded normal levels. The following videos provide good information. http://www.youtube.com/user/NOAAPMEL?feature=mhum#p/c/3BDBAAAA7D4EB2DA/0/2mKbFORiDzg

Ocean Observing Systems (OOS) and Tsunami Warnings

Ocean Observing Systems (OOS) have many sensors. One function is to detect earthquales using seismometers and hydrophones, and tsunamis using bottom pressure recorders. A massive 8.9 magnitude earthquake hit the Pacific Ocean nearby Northeastern Japan at around 2:46pm on March 11 (JST) causing damage with blackouts, fire and tsunami. These videos give some background information. […]
Ocean Observing Systems (OOS) have many sensors. One function is to detect earthquales using seismometers and hydrophones, and tsunamis using bottom pressure recorders. A massive 8.9 magnitude earthquake hit the Pacific Ocean nearby Northeastern Japan at around 2:46pm on March 11 (JST) causing damage with blackouts, fire and tsunami. These videos give some background information. http://www.youtube.com/user/NOAAPMEL?feature=mhum#p/c/0/2mKbFORiDzg http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-pacific-12709598

Using Wounded Dogs to Navigate Ships on the High Seas

Using Wounded Dogs to Navigate Ships on the High Seas Finding the latitude of a sailing ship can be surprisingly easy: sight the elevation of the Pole Star above the local horizon. Finding longitude turns out to be quite a bit harder because, as the earth rotates, the stars sweep across the sky 15 degree […]

Using Wounded Dogs to Navigate Ships on the High Seas

Finding the latitude of a sailing ship can be surprisingly easy: sight the elevation of the Pole Star above the local horizon. Finding longitude turns out to be quite a bit harder because, as the earth rotates, the stars sweep across the sky 15 degree every hour. A one second timing error thus translates into a 0.25 nautical mile error in position. How is it possible to measure time on board a ship at sea with sufficient accuracy to make two-dimensional a practical enterprise?

One 18th century innovator, whose name has long since been forgotten, advocated the use of a special patent medicine said to involve some rather extraordinary properties. Unlike other popular nostrums of the day, the Power of Sympathy, as its inventor, Sir Klenm Digby, called it, was applied not to the wound but to the weapon that inflicted it. The World of Mathematics, a book published by Simon and Schuster, describes how this magical remedy was to be employed as an aid to maritime navigation.

Before sailing, every ship should be furnished with a wounded dog. A reliable observer on shore, equipped with a reliable clock and a bandage from the dog’s wound, would do the rest. very hour on the dot, he would immerse the dog’s bandage in a solution of the Power of Sympathy and the dog on shipboard would yelp the hour.

As far as we know, this intriguing method of navigation was never actually tested under realistic field conditions, so we have no convincing evidence that it would have worked as advertised.