ATI Announces NEW FREE short course sessions

ATI is pleased to announce a new series of free virtual short courses starting in January 2021, led by industry leaders and some of your favorite instructors.  These 1-hour sessions, from 12:30pm to 1:30pm ET, will be delivered live and you will have an opportunity to ask the instructors questions at the end of the […]

ATI is pleased to announce a new series of free virtual short courses starting in January 2021, led by industry leaders and some of your favorite instructors.  These 1-hour sessions, from 12:30pm to 1:30pm ET, will be delivered live and you will have an opportunity to ask the instructors questions at the end of the session.  Each short session includes an important take way from one of our full courses that can be implemented on your project.  Keep visiting aticourses.com as we schedule more.

January 8th

CSEP preparation – January 8, 2021 – FREE short session – Virtual Live Webinar

Instructor: William “Bill” Fournier

Full course January 26 – 28

Certified Systems Engineering Professional

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January 25

Fix EMI Problems in Cables & Connectors – January 25, 2021 FREE short session

Instructor: Daryl Gerke

Full course February 23-26

EMI/EMC in Military Systems

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February 1

Combat EW Operations in Southeast Asia, a Focused Retrospective on EW – February 1, 2021 FREE short session

Instructor: Dr. Clayton Stewart

Full curse March 9-11

21st Century EW

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March 12, 2021

Anti-Radiation Missiles – March 12, 2021 FREE short session

Instructor: Dr. Clayton Stewart

Full course May 4-6

Electronic Protection and Electronic Attack

Hand-Held Radar Detects Jet?

An ATI Staff Member who has not taken any ATI Radar Courses yet found a story in her Inbox about a highway officer in Texas who was operating a hand-held radar to catch speeders.  As you can read in the following copy of the letter, the officer purportedly locked onto a USMC F/A-18 Hornet Jet.  […]

An ATI Staff Member who has not taken any ATI Radar Courses yet found a story in her Inbox about a highway officer in Texas who was operating a hand-held radar to catch speeders.  As you can read in the following copy of the letter, the officer purportedly locked onto a USMC F/A-18 Hornet Jet.  The story purports that the Jet detected energy from the hand held radar, and automatic tactical systems on the Jet nearly fired on the radar/officer, but the pilot overrode those automatic systems preventing a catastrophic mishap.

Although this story is humorous, it also demonstrates that the writer, and some readers, are not familiar with how hand-held radars work, and how the Tactical Systems on the USMC Jet work.  In fact, a Snopes article gives an excellent explanation of why this story, although humorous and entertaining, is not factual, and could not have actually occurred.  A fascinating explanation of the fallacies associated with this story can be found at   https://www.snopes.com/fact-check/police-radar-missile/

So, in order to better recognize articles like this for what they are, please consider learning more about Radar Systems.  ATI offers 78 courses dealing with Radar, Missiles, and Defense, but our most popular Radar courses are Radar 101, Radar 201, and Radar Principles.  More information on all of these courses can be found on the ATI web page at the following links.

In Memory of Thomas Stanley Logsdon

Thomas Stanley Logsdon, 82, of Seal Beach, California, passed away on May 1, 2020. Tom was an internationally recognized rocket scientist, author, expert witness, keynote lecturer, and short course instructor. He used his extraordinary knowledge of mathematics and physics to help put a dozen astronauts on the moon and played an integral role in the […]

Thomas Stanley Logsdon, 82, of Seal Beach, California, passed away on May 1, 2020. Tom was an internationally recognized rocket scientist, author, expert witness, keynote lecturer, and short course instructor. He used his extraordinary knowledge of mathematics and physics to help put a dozen astronauts on the moon and played an integral role in the invention of the Global Positioning System (GPS), which is so vital to our modern world.

Tom was a well-recognized and praised Applied Technology Instructor for more than 30 years. Tom would typically come teach his courses in Columbia two or three times yearly, enjoying a long friendship during dinners with ATI’s President Jim Jenkins. A great friendship also developed between Lisa Badart and Tom, with over 13 years of working together to schedule and facilitate his courses. He loved to share with Lisa his adventures and stories. ATI Staff old and new loved working with him. He will be missed by all. See some links to his popular courses below.

Tom was born on September 27th, 1937 to George Stanley Logsdon and Margaret Buckman Logsdon, in Springfield Kentucky. After graduating from Springfield High School in 1955, he went on to earn a Bachelor’s degree in Math & Physics at Eastern Kentucky University and a Master’s degree in Point-Set Topology (Mathematics) from the University of Kentucky. He had many wonderful teachers, but always fondly recalled Prof. Robertson from Springfield High School, and his college mentor, Dr. Smith Park, a beloved Mathematics professor at EKU. In 1984, he was awarded an honorary PhD from EKU and was the Alumni of the year for EKU’s 100th anniversary.

After graduation, Tom landed his first job as an Aero-ballistics Engineer for McDonnell Douglas Aircraft in Santa Monica, CA, kicking off a 32-year career in the aerospace industry. He was recruited by Rockwell International to become a Trajectory Mathematician on the Apollo Space program. When asked about his job on a television interview, he said, with his usual clever sense of humor, “before the flight, we predict where the rocket will go, and after the flight we try to explain why it didn’t go there!”

He went on to work on the Shuttle Spacecraft program and in the mid-1970s Tom employed his mathematical genius to determine the placement of 24 satellites (satellite constellation) which make up our worldwide GPS. He was recently recognized as one of 28 original Inventors of GPS. While at Rockwell, he also worked on the Saturn V moon rocket, Skylab flight maneuvers, and unmanned Mars missions. He was also awarded the Rockwell Presidential Award and held a patent centered around navigation of jetliners.

In addition, Tom was a well-respected author, writing over 30 books, from his first book about space travel, “A Rush Toward the Stars”, to some of the first computer programming books, to his best-selling “Six Simple Solutions that Shook the World.”  He also taught computer science at USC for many years.

After retiring from Rockwell, Tom ran a full-time business up until his death, producing books, magazine articles, and technical papers; teaching GPS & Orbital Mechanics short courses for NASA & JPL, lecturing around the world, being a guest speaker for Crystal Cruises (averaging 8 cruises a year), and appearing on radio and TV.

He was passionate about playing tennis and did so until just prior to his death. His career and pleasure travel took him to over 100 countries, all seven continents, and around the globe several times over. In 2016, Tom was inducted into the Kentucky Aviation Museum Hall of Fame.

Tom wed Cynda (Cyndi) Hedrick in Newport Beach, CA and became stepfather to Chad Stephen Logsdon.  Cyndi Logsdon actively supported Tom’s business by designing his charts & course materials; giving him feedback on his courses, books, and presentations; keeping him organized; and accompanying him to many exotic places to coordinate his appearances.

Tom was preceded in death by his parents, Stanley and Margaret Logsdon, his wife Cynda, his sister, Ann Logsdon Sims of Bardstown, KY, and two sisters who died in infancy, Molly and Rose Mary. He is survived by daughter, Donna (Drew) Schilder, along with his stepson Chad, his brother, Pat (Patsy) Logsdon of Loretto, KY, seven nieces and nephews, and numerous great-nieces and nephews.

Tom’s ATI courses offered over 30 years        

Global Navigation Satellite Systems

If You Want to BE a Rocket Scientist, Maybe You should LISTEN to one

GPS Solutions on Earth and in Space

Applied Technology Institute Instructor, Tom Logsdon, Helps International Surveyors Master Their Craft

GPS/GNSS Operation for Engineers and Technical Professionals – Virtual Webinar Live

 Please join us for a virtual/Zoommeeting for:

Tom Logsdon’s Virtual “Celebration of Life”

May 30 at 10 AM PST

Zoom Video Conference Info:

Join from PC, Mac, Linux, iOS or Android: 

https://zoom.us/j/2014287217

 US: +16699006833,,2014287217#

Or Telephone Dial-In: 

US: +1 669 900 6833 or +1 646 876 9923

International numbers link

 Meeting ID: 201 428 7217

NOTE: If you have not used Zoom before, to see the video, you will need to download the App on your smartphone, Mac, or PC prior to joining the meeting.  You can go here and choose the appropriate platform: https://zoom.us/download or when you click on the meeting link above, it will ask you to download the App. Or You can call in to the Telephone Dial-In number and just listen.                         

LEGO”S New Market: Mindfulness for Stressed-out Adults

In a January 16, 2020 Washington Post article, Abha Bhattarai writes about LEGO’s growing demographic of stressed-out adults.  One person’s LEGO time is described as a “kind of guided meditation.”   The author of the LEGO book, Build Yourself Happy: The Joy of Lego Play, calls her LEGO pieces “therapeutic.” LEGO is capitalizing on the growing adult market by […]
In a January 16, 2020 Washington Post article, Abha Bhattarai writes about LEGO’s growing demographic of stressed-out adults.  One person’s LEGO time is described as a “kind of guided meditation.”   The author of the LEGO book, Build Yourself Happy: The Joy of Lego Play, calls her LEGO pieces “therapeutic.” LEGO is capitalizing on the growing adult market by improving their instructions and introducing new lines of models to provide a “joyful creative challenge.” Eric Honour, founder of Honourcode, a Systems Engineering training company now owned by Applied Technology Institute, LLC, has used LEGOs for years in a couple of the training classes.  Students build robots using Mindstorms Robotic Invention System 2.0. Both successes and failures with the final LEGO robots results in great fun and a huge learning experience. ATI courses which incorporate the Mindstorm RIS 2.0 Lego Sets include: Applied Systems Engineering has four different groups building LEGO robots to interact as a whole.  The LEGO exercise demonstrates concept, methods, requirements, system architecting, product design and implementation, integration and test, and leadership and collaboration. Applied Test & Evaluation uses LEGOs in groups for a Test Challenge:  Plan for T&E, build the robot per instructions, then follow their T&E plan. What an amazing toy!  Fun for kids of all ages.  Valuable as a means to relax, to collaborate, to test, and to learn to better work with yourself and others. %MCEPASTEBIN%

The World Is Changing, So Maybe ATI Should Too.

The world is changing, so maybe ATI should too. Applied Technology Institute (ATI) has conducted specialized training in satellite communications, space, defense, radar, sonar and acoustics, signal processing, and specialized engineering and systems engineering since 1984.  Our clients include DOD, government agencies, military, government and military contractors, technical industries, NASA facilities, and aerospace contractors. A […]

The world is changing, so maybe ATI should too.

Applied Technology Institute (ATI) has conducted specialized training in satellite communications, space, defense, radar, sonar and acoustics, signal processing, and specialized engineering and systems engineering since 1984.  Our clients include DOD, government agencies, military, government and military contractors, technical industries, NASA facilities, and aerospace contractors.

A complete list of ATI’s offerings can be found at https://www.aticourses.com/courses/   .  At a glance, it appears to be a comprehensive list of courses that would be of interest to any Rocket Scientist, who, as the ATI tagline suggests, we believe to be our core students.

The year is now 2020 and a lot of things have changed since Applied Technology Institute was founded in 1984.  Technology has advanced in ways that could never have been anticipated, wars are no longer being fought in the same way, and relationships between countries are no longer as stable as they had once been.  The world is changing, so maybe ATI should too.

Perhaps, employees of our core customers ( DOD, government agencies, military, government and military contractors, technical industries, NASA facilities, and aerospace contractors ) need to be more than just Rocket Scientists today.  In addition to understanding Rocket Science, they may also need to be familiar with the world in which the Rockets will be deployed, and the geo political conditions under which they will be deployed.  With this additional background, the Rocket Scientist will be better able to understand the requirements of his Rockets, and the needs of the soldiers who will be using those Rockets.  Said differently, perhaps the Rocket needs to be considered as a part of a larger system which includes the organizations that use the Rocket, and the goals of those organizations. 

So, through this blog, ATI is asking our readers for their opinion.  Should ATI expand our course offerings to include more courses which will show Rocket Scientists how and why their Rockets will be used?

One example of a possible new ATI course deals with Peacekeeping and Stability Operations.  The following Course Description is from the syllabus of “Peacekeeping and Stability Operations”. The instructor for this course would be Mr. Stephen Phillips from JHU/APL.

 Course Description ( Peacekeeping and Stability Operations )  Intelligence plays a pivotal role in the identification, preparation, and execution of peacekeeping and stability operations performed in a multinational context. Stability and peace operations are designed to prevent, contain, or resolve regional conflicts. These operations are increasingly becoming a core mission in supporting the overall goals and objectives of the current global conflict. This course examines the concepts of nation building, stabilization, reconstruction, and transition across the spectrum of peace operations and analyzes the role of various actors, including nongovernmental organizations, intergovernmental organizations, private military companies, and government organizations, and how they interact in the stabilization mission and environment.

One example of an American intervention to stabilize and reduce the expansion of conflict occurred in the Persian Gulf in the 1980s.  Operation Earnest Will was the American Military protection of Kuwaiti-owned tankers from Iranian attacks in 1987/1988, three years into the Tanker War phase of the Iran-Iraq War.   Steve recently presented an excellent summary of Operation Earnest Will.  This presentation can be viewed at   https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FZUQiKDmhE8

ATI looks forward to growing our course list, and growing our student body, through collaborations such as this.  Again, we would love to hear what you think.

Quality, Precision, Performance – UAS’s, the future of conventional and shadow wars is here.

A recent article on the Military.com web site shares the story of the latest attack by a swarm of drones and guided missiles on Saudi Oil Plants. Saudi Arabia currently has at least six Patriot batteries, which cost about $1 billion apiece, according to Bloomberg News. But analysts said the systems are designed to defend […]

A recent article on the Military.com web site shares the story of the latest attack by a swarm of drones and guided missiles on Saudi Oil Plants. Saudi Arabia currently has at least six Patriot batteries, which cost about $1 billion apiece, according to Bloomberg News. But analysts said the systems are designed to defend against high-flying ballistic missiles and were vulnerable to swarms of low-and-slow drones and subsonic, ground-hugging cruise missiles. This article highlights the ever changing military world, and the need for ongoing education and training on emerging technology.

From the State Department in 2015 “As other nations begin to employ military UAS more regularly and as the nascent commercial UAS market emerges, the United States has a responsibility to ensure that sales, transfers, and subsequent use of all US-origin UAS are responsible and consistent with US national security and foreign policy interests, including economic security, as well as with US values and international standards.” This issue was discussed in an ATI Blog from 2015. While the UAS market is no longer the new kid on the block, it is ever changing now more than ever. We need to continue effective training and education for ongoing support and future development as well as that of guided missiles as they are now being used in tandem. As we move forward into 2020 the need for continuing training and education on UAS, engineering and missile design and deployment is clearly a worldwide hot spot and needed now more so then ever. Whether the UAS is for conventional or shadow wars, ATI Courses has an education offering to help you navigate these ever emerging technologies. 

Unmanned Aircraft System Fundamentals TBD

Unmanned Air Vehicle Design TBD

Systems Engineering Fundamentals 02/04/2020

Applied Systems Engineering 12/09/2019

Missile Design Development and Systems  3/09/2020

What we have here is a failure to communicate ( Systems Engineering )

Although the term “Systems Engineering” dates back to the 1940s, and the concept was practiced even earlier than that, there seems to be a growing emphasis on System Engineering, perhaps because Systems have become more complex in recent times.  During my early years of training and practice as an electrical engineer decades ago, I do […]

Although the term “Systems Engineering” dates back to the 1940s, and the concept was practiced even earlier than that, there seems to be a growing emphasis on System Engineering, perhaps because Systems have become more complex in recent times.  During my early years of training and practice as an electrical engineer decades ago, I do not recall hearing or learning much about Systems Engineering, but it seems to have gotten much more well-deserved attention since then.  Feel free to argue these points if you wish, but this has been my observation.

So, what can go wrong if Systems Engineering principles are ignored?  What could possibly go wrong if you have multiple engineers concentrating on their own aspect of the overall design, and no one paying attention to the overall system?    Take a look at this humorous video and see what can happen…

But seriously, though…..

One of the best descriptions of Systems Engineering that I have seen is from INCOSE ( International Council on Systems Engineering ).  It says “Systems engineers are at the heart of creating successful new systems. They are responsible for the system concept, architecture, and design. They analyze and manage complexity and risk. They decide how to measure whether the deployed system actually works as intended. They are responsible for a myriad of other facets of system creation. Systems engineering is the discipline that makes their success possible – their tools, techniques, methods, knowledge, standards, principles, and concepts. The launch of successful systems can invariably be traced to innovative and effective systems engineering.”

So, how can today’s busy and overworked engineer learn more about Systems Engineering?  Or, even if you think you already know everything about Systems Engineering, how can you refresh your knowledge so it is more relevant to the workplace of 2019? 

Applied Technology Institute may have exactly what you are looking for.  ATI recently merged with Honourcode, Inc., and now offers a full line of Systems Engineering courses being taught by original Honourcode instructors, including Eric Honour.

 There is still time to register for our next offering of Applied Systems Engineering, being offered in Columbia, Md starting on September 23, 2019.  This course includes a  hands-on class exercise conducted in small groups. Part A analyzes a system concept and requirements, developing specific test requirements,. Part B creates an effective test program and test procedures for the product system. Part C builds the robotic systems per assembly instructions. Part D implements the test program to evaluate the final robots.  It is a really fun and informative in-class exercise.   Here is a cool video of the System Product built in this class.

Please read more about this opportunity at the following link.

Apollo Trash Talk

Since it has been 50 years since man first stepped on the Moon (Apollo 11), and since we are now winding down from the celebration of the 50th anniversary of that great event, we should remember that there are still physical remnants of that mission, and other missions, which remain on the surface of the […]

Since it has been 50 years since man first stepped on the Moon (Apollo 11), and since we are now winding down from the celebration of the 50th anniversary of that great event, we should remember that there are still physical remnants of that mission, and other missions, which remain on the surface of the moon, and that this landing site, and similar landing sites, have significant historical importance.  In fact, there is an organization called “For All Moonkind, Inc”, which has a stated mission to “protect each of the six human lunar landing and similar sites in outer space as part of our common human heritage.”  Learn more about this organization at https://www.forallmoonkind.org

So, what did mankind leave on the moon, and why did we leave it there?  A full catalog of items left behind can be found at https://history.nasa.gov/FINAL%20Catalogue%20of%20Manmade%20Material%20on%20the%20Moon.pdf    It is a fascinating read, but why was so much left behind?  Some of the things left behind were memorial or tributary items.  Other items were left purely to lighten the load and facilitate the return trip to earth.  And there were items left for scientific experiments.  For experiments, some items were left because engineers are simply hoping to examine them in the future to determine how they have fared after continuous exposure to the elevated radiation levels on the moon.  Other items, however, were part of actual moon experiments which delivered data to earth scientists.   The only remaining Apollo experiment that still returns data to earth after 50 years is NASA’s Lunar Ranging Experiment, LURE.

 The story of LURE is a fascinating one and can be found at https://spectrum.ieee.org/the-institute/ieee-history/one-apollo-11-experiment-is-still-going-50-years-later  LURE allows the precise measurement of the distance from the earth to the moon using high power laser on earth, and an array of mirrors, or retroreflectors, on the surface of the moon.  The first mirrors were placed on the moon by Apollo 11, but additional mirrors were placed on the moon by later Apollo missions.  Lunar laser ranging has allowed man to monitor the distance to the moon for the past 50 years, and we have noted that the distance to the moon increases by a very small amount each year.  Additionally, LURE has increased mankind’s fundamental understanding of things like the earth’s rotations, continental drift, and gravity itself.

As it is now 2019, and the world is more waste-conscious than it has ever been, we can only hope that there will be increased attention to reducing the amount we leave on the lunar surface, and in space.  Although some material will certainly be left during upcoming planned lunar landings, we can only hope that it will be done for rational reasons, and in a sensible way.

To learn more about working in Space, consider taking one of the many Space, Satellite, or Aerospace courses offered by ATI.  A complete listing of all ATI courses can be found at https://www.aticourses.com/courses    ATI does not currently offer any Space Archeology classes, but if anyone knows a qualified instructor for this class, we would be happy to talk to them.

Welcome to the US Space Force, ATI is here to support you

There are currently 5 branches of the Armed Forces, namely, Army, Navy, Marines, Air Force,  and the Coast Guard.  However, in light of changing needs and priorities, President Trump issued a new directive in February to establish the US Space Force as the sixth military branch,  which will be within the Department of the Air […]

There are currently 5 branches of the Armed Forces, namely, Army, Navy, Marines, Air Force,  and the Coast Guard.  However, in light of changing needs and priorities, President Trump issued a new directive in February to establish the US Space Force as the sixth military branch,  which will be within the Department of the Air Force. 

This directive can be found at  

https://www.whitehouse.gov/presidential-actions/text-space-policy-directive-4-establishment-united-states-space-force/

The directive states that “ Although United States space systems have historically maintained a technological advantage over those of our potential adversaries, those potential adversaries are now advancing their space capabilities and actively developing ways to deny our use of space in a crisis or conflict.  It is imperative that the United States adapt its national security organizations, policies, doctrine, and capabilities to deter aggression and protect our interests.”

The directive provides the following priorities for the Space Force:

(a)  Protecting the Nation’s interests in space and the peaceful use of space for all responsible actors, consistent with applicable law, including international law;

(b)  Ensuring unfettered use of space for United States national security purposes, the United States economy, and United States persons, partners, and allies;

(c)  Deterring aggression and defending the Nation,
United States allies, and United States interests from hostile acts in and from space;

(d)  Ensuring that needed space capabilities are integrated and available to all United States Combatant Commands;

(e)  Projecting military power in, from, and to space in support of our Nation’s interests; and

(f)  Developing, maintaining, and improving a community of professionals focused on the national security demands of the space domain.

The directive specifies that Space Force will be lead by a civilian to be known as the Undersecretary of the Air Force for Space, and will be appointed by the President and approved by the Senate.  The directive specifies that a senior military officer ( General or Admiral ) will serve as the Chief of Staff of the Space Force, and will serve as a member of the Joint Chiefs of Staff. 

Applied Technology Institute looks forward to providing training to the workforce which will be needed to support the US Space Force. 

A list of all the Space Related Courses offered by ATI can be found at

https://www.aticourses.com/catalog_of_all_ATI_courses.htm#space

 

Specific and upcoming Space-Related Courses include:

Communications Payload Design

Mar 19-22, 2019 Columbia, MD

 Tactical Intelligence, Surveillance & Reconnaissance (ISR) System

Mar 25-28, 2019 Columbia, MD

 Space Mission Structures

Apr 16-18, 2019 Littleton, CO

 Vibration Testing of Small Satellites

Apr 30-May 1, 2019 Littleton, CO

 Satellite Communications- Introduction

May 1-3, 2019 Columbia, MD 

If your organization requires Space-Related Training which you do not currently see in our Course Offerings, please give us a call and we will try to accommodate your needs. 

Happy Groundhog Day!

We are halfway between the winter solstice and the spring equinox, also known as, Groundhog day!  If you want to know more about the origins of this tradition, you can find that at the link below, but the story involves bears and badgers, and Germans and Christians, and superstition and science.  You can’t make this […]

We are halfway between the winter solstice and the spring equinox, also known as, Groundhog day!  If you want to know more about the origins of this tradition, you can find that at the link below, but the story involves bears and badgers, and Germans and Christians, and superstition and science.  You can’t make this stuff up, and you can’t tell the story any better than The Old Farmers Almanac.  Check it out at….

https://www.almanac.com/content/groundhog-day-history-meaning-folklore?

It will be a stretch to relate Groundhog day to courses offered by ATI, but we will give it a try.   That pesky groundhog needs to draw on his Remote Sensing abilities in order to have such a wonderful batting average.  If you want to learn more about Remote Sensing, consider one of the Remote Sensing Courses offered by ATi, like perhaps…  Optical & Remote Sensing or Microwave Remote Sensing or Geomatics – GIS, GPS and Remote Sensing or Directions in Space Remote Sensing.

Lastly, and SPOILER ALERT….Spring will be coming early this year.  I can’t wait.

Groundhog Day 2019:The Prediction and Photos

Recall That Curiosity Rover Was Delivered to Mars by an ATLAS Rocket in 2011

There are so many Space Exploration Missions that are on the front page of the papers now, New Horizons for example.  Let us not forget about ongoing missions that are no longer getting as much publicity at they may deserve, JPL Mars Science Lab Curiosity Rover Mission for example.The Curiosity Rover Mission was launched in […]

There are so many Space Exploration Missions that are on the front page of the papers now, New Horizons for example.  Let us not forget about ongoing missions that are no longer getting as much publicity at they may deserve, JPL Mars Science Lab Curiosity Rover Mission for example.

The Curiosity Rover Mission was launched in November 2011 for an 8-month trip to Mars.  Once on Mars, the Curiosity Mission was expected to last 2 years.  Amazingly, the Curiosity Rover Mission is still in progress, and periodic updates on the status of that mission are still being posted at https://mars.nasa.gov/msl/mission/mars-rover-curiosity-mission-updates/

The success of that mission did not start when the Rover started sending back amazing pictures from Mars.  The success of that mission started when the Rocket and Launch Vehicle propelled Rover into Space.    The Atlas V-541 Rocket selected for this mission and built by Boeing Corp and Lockheed Martin Corp.  performed as designed.  If it had not performed as well as it did, the entire mission could have been in jeopardy.  Rockets and Launch Vehicles are truly acritical component of every mission.

ATI is offering a Course on Rocket and Launch Vehicles in Columbia, Maryland from February 11 to 14, 2019.  The course is being taught by Edward Keith, a multi-discipline Launch Vehicle System Engineer, specializing in integration of launch vehicle technology, design, modeling and business strategies.  There is still time to enroll in this class, and you will be finished in time to get home for dinner on Valentine’s day! 

Please consider learning more about this ATI offering, and enroll in the ATI class, by going to https://www.aticourses.com/rockets_launch_vehicles.html

 

Coding for kids: Alice’s Story

Nothing is cuter than pictures of kids sitting at their computers, mastering skills their parents never dreamed of. And nothing is more popular than the current idea that all children should learn to code.My husband, Philip,  & I strongly support this idea.  He has been in IT since he was 18 years old and wants […]

Nothing is cuter than pictures of kids sitting at their computers, mastering skills their parents never dreamed of. And nothing is more popular than the current idea that all children should learn to code.

My husband, Philip,  & I strongly support this idea.  He has been in IT since he was 18 years old and wants our oldest daughter, Alice, to get involved in the IT field as well.

Alice is an 8 year old and extremely active child.  When we introduced her to coding she was hooked!  She spent hours working on her coding projects.  It was so wonderful to see her working with her father and asking questions when she hit a difficult task.

Yesterday, she received a certificate of completion stating that she has demonstrated an understanding of basic concepts of Computer Science.  

We couldn’t be more proud!

Here is the list of the main sources that could be tapped for teaching kids how to code:

Code.org
This nonprofit foundation website is a great starting point for coding novices. It shares plenty of useful online resources, apps, and even local schools that teach coding. Be sure to watch the inspirational video on the main page. Updated periodically, the current iteration features some of the biggest names in tech talking about how they got started in coding.

CodeAcademy
This interactive website is user-friendly and teaches kids basic code through fun, simple exercises that feel like games.

Code Avengers
While Code Avengers lacks the eye-catching graphics of other options, it does offer a series of free intro classes in building web pages, apps, and games. Get started with the 7-day free trial, which grants access to the first five lessons in each course, ranging from Python, to web development, JavaScript, and more. If you like what you see, register for a membership plan that cost $29/month and requires no long-term commitment. A six-month plan costs $120.

Code Combat
Best for older kids, Code Combat uses an interactive, competitive gameplay mode to stimulate learning. Once you set up your parent account, kids can be online, playing in seconds. FREE

Codemoji
Put those ubiquitous emojis to work in an educational way with this website that eschews complex codes for user-friendly expressions, quite literally. Kids learn to code by using emojis to substitute for html or css codes. They’ll have so much fun, they won’t realize the work they’re putting in. Codemoji plans start at $9.99 for three months, but include up to five kids’ accounts in that price.

Code Monster
Particularly good for kids, Code Monster features two adjacent boxes. One displays code, the other shows what the code does. As you play with the code (with some help from a prompt), you learn what each command does. FREE

Khan Academy
Known for its extensive and challenging math games, Khan Academy also has basic programming tutorials that teach kids how to build graphics, animations, interactive visualizations, and more. FREE

Lightbot
Predominantly an app-based program, Lightbot offers a FREE demo online as part of its Hour of Code. Like what you see? Its pair of low-cost programming apps are all-ages friendly. Available for iOs, Android, and Amazon devices for $2.99.

Scratch
Designed by MIT students and aimed at children ages 8 to 16, this easy-to-use programming language lets kids build almost anything they can dream. There are no obscure lines of code here. Instead, arrange and snap together Scratch blocks as if they were virtual Legos. But it’s more than just a coding guide, it’s a vibrant online community of programmers who swap ideas and inspiration. FREE

Stencyl
Inspired by Scratch’s snapping blocks system, this software allows users to create simple games for iOS, Android, Flash, Windows, Linux, and Mac systems. If your child is serious about it, there are paid pro plans that come with advanced functionality.

Tech Rocket
Founded by iD Tech, Tech Rocket’s free platform allows access to a dozen classes. For those looking for a more advanced experience, paid subscriptions are $19 per month.

 

Bombers and Subs and Missiles, oh my!

Speaking for myself, I always considered the nuclear triad to include bombers, submarines, and missiles, but, I was wrong. Sandra Erwin points out in her Space News article, we really need to remember that these three components of the triad could not be effective without two other complimentary components, a competent work force to operate […]

Speaking for myself, I always considered the nuclear triad to include bombers, submarines, and missiles, but, I was wrong. Sandra Erwin points out in her Space News article, we really need to remember that these three components of the triad could not be effective without two other complimentary components, a competent work force to operate them, and a modern and reliable Nuclear Command, Control and Communications ( NC3 ) network.

Lt. Gen Jack Weinstein, Air Force Deputy Chief of Staff for Strategic Deterrence and Nuclear Integration recently pointed out that nuclear modernization efforts cannot be strictly focused on subs, bombers, and missiles, but must also be concerned about modernizing the NC3 system, causing him to remark “The Triad also means space capability.” The Nuclear Posture Review reported that many of the components of the current NC3 system are antiquated technology which has not been modernized in almost 30 years. 

Sandra Erwin reports that the Air Force does have programs under way to modernize communications and early-warning satellites, but integration of these new systems will be very complex, and highly trained work force will be needed to build the systems.

Interestingly, Lt. Gen Weinstein has confidence in the military’s ability to train their people to operate these systems, but he expresses concern about educating the civilian workforce which will also need to be involved.

Applied Technology Institute (ATI) can play an important role in preparing the workforce which will support the future nuclear Triad since it offers a diverse collection of courses which cover all of the domains where the Triad will need to operate; air, sea, and space. Please consider looking at the current set of course offerings at ATI and consider taking some of our courses to better position yourself to make significant contributions to solving the complex problems associated with Strategic Deterrence in the future.  

 

Wow, just Wow!

Happy 118th Birthday US Submarine Force! Happy 118th Birthday US Submarine Force! Take a look at an inspirational video at https://www.facebook.com/SUBLANT/videos/2214786651871777/  made by COMSUBLANT commemorating this anniversary. My first inclination after watching this video was to join the US Navy and become a submariner. If you want to do that, you can go to the […]

Happy 118th Birthday US Submarine Force!

Happy 118th Birthday US Submarine Force!

Take a look at an inspirational video at https://www.facebook.com/SUBLANT/videos/2214786651871777/  made by COMSUBLANT commemorating this anniversary.

My first inclination after watching this video was to join the US Navy and become a submariner. If you want to do that, you can go to the US Navy homepage.  The Navy is always looking for good people.

Since I am too old to join the Navy, my second inclination was to learn more about Submarines and Submariners. Lucky for me, ATI has just such a course.  You can learn by taking the ATI “Submarines and Submariners Course” taught by two retired Submarine Commanders.  Check out the Submarine Course at https://www.aticourses.com/Submarines_and_Submariners_Introduction.html

NASA Wants Your Help to Name a Space Object, What Could Go Wrong

There’s a small, icy object floating at the outer edge of our Solar System, in the messy Kuiper belt. Or it could be two objects, astronomers are not sure. But NASA is on track to find out more, as that object has been chosen as the next flyby target for the New Horizons spacecraft – the […]
quaoar_animation_dark_crsub_circleThere’s a small, icy object floating at the outer edge of our Solar System, in the messy Kuiper belt. Or it could be two objects, astronomers are not sure. But NASA is on track to find out more, as that object has been chosen as the next flyby target for the New Horizons spacecraft – the same probe that gave us incredible photos of Pluto in 2015. And now they want your help to give that target a catchy name. Currently, the enigmatic Kuiper belt object is designated 2014 MU69, but that’s just the provisional string of letters and numbers any newly discovered object gets. “Yes, we’re going to give 2014 MU69 a real name, rather than just the “license plate” designator it has now,” New Horizons’ principal investigator Alan Stern wrote in a blog post earlier this year. “The details of how we’ll name it are still being worked out, but NASA announced a few weeks back that it will involve a public naming contest.” And now, folks, our time to shine has arrived. NASA has finally extended an invitation for people to submit their ideas for a name, although they note this is not going to be the officially-official name just yet, but rather a nickname to be used until the flyby happens. The team at New Horizons already have a bunch of ideas prepared, which now form the basis of the naming campaign, and anyone can already vote for those. Amongst current choices put forward by the team are Z’ha’dum – a fictional planet from the TV series Babylon 5; Camalor – a fictional city actually located in the Kuiper belt according to Robert L. Forward’s novel Camelot 30K; and Mjölnir – the name of Norse thunder god Thor’s epic hammer. One of the most interesting aspects of MU69 is that we’re not even sure whether the object is one body or two – telescope observations have hinted it could actually be two similarly-sized bodies either in close mutual orbit, or even stuck together. Read more.

NASA Center Directors Launch World Series Bragging Rights Duel

Following up on our last blog and from a Press Release posted Thursday, October 26, 2017, by the JetPropulsion Laboratory: When it comes to space exploration, many believe America must make a choice between having human “Astros” exploring the solar system or using robotic probes as planet or asteroid “Dodgers.” NASA sees both approaches as essential […]
nasa-dodgers-blog-image Following up on our last blog and from a Press Release posted Thursday, October 26, 2017, by the JetPropulsion Laboratory: When it comes to space exploration, many believe America must make a choice between having human “Astros” exploring the solar system or using robotic probes as planet or asteroid “Dodgers.” NASA sees both approaches as essential to expanding the human presence in the universe. But that doesn’t mean that two of NASA’s centers can’t engage in a little friendly rivalry when it comes to their hometown baseball teams competing in the 2017 World Series. Houston is home to both the American League’s Houston Astros and NASA’s Johnson Space Center (JSC), the hub of human spaceflight, while the Los Angeles area is home to both the National League’s L.A. Dodgers and NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in Pasadena, California, one of the pillars of robotic space and planetary missions. On behalf of their respective centers, JSC Director Ellen Ochoa, who actually is a native Californian, and JPL Director Michael Watkins, who actually is a University of Texas at Austin alumnus, have decided the World Series deserves to be the subject of a little bragging rights wager. So, here’s the contest: If the Houston Astros win the best-of-seven series, Watkins will have to wear an Astros jersey for a day. If the series goes the L.A. Dodgers’ way, Ochoa will wear a Dodgers jersey. “JSC is proud to be a citizen of Houston, and, as such, we are proud of all the city’s accomplishments and its great spirit,” Ochoa said. “And our team is actually named after our space center, so I’m happy to be able to show support for that, and glad to have a little fun in challenging a center that, except for this week, is our close partner in exploration. I am looking forward to seeing a little bit of Houston at JPL soon.” “JPLers are proud to work and live in the Los Angeles area here in beautiful Southern California,” Watkins said. “We love the chance to show our support for this great city, and for the great baseball tradition of the Dodgers. This is a nice way to have a little fun with our good friends at JSC and we hope to see some Dodger blue there shortly.” When it comes to the reality of spaceflight, the two centers have collaborated and compared notes on a variety of space projects for nearly half a century. NASA understands that robotic exploration has always been a precursor to human space exploration and that more and more, we see robots and humans flying together, helping each other explore. Rather than rivals, JSC and JPL are close teammates in expanding our knowledge of the universe and increasing the limits humanity explores. But in the meantime, JSC invites all Astros fans to “Orange Out” and JPL invites all Dodgers fans to “Bleed Blue.” May the best team win!

Baseball Predictions and Home-Team Hopes

Last year, my colleague, Lisa Badart, wrote a post about the pride for her favorite team, the Chicago Cubs, winning the World Series. I commented on her post that I had predicted this win. It’s important to note that, although I adore baseball, I am not particularly known to closely follow rosters, statistics, and standings […]
Dodgers-Image-Post-2017
Friends lucky enough to attend game 1 of the 2017 World Series at Dodgers Stadium.
Last year, my colleague, Lisa Badart, wrote a post about the pride for her favorite team, the Chicago Cubs, winning the World Series. I commented on her post that I had predicted this win. It’s important to note that, although I adore baseball, I am not particularly known to closely follow rosters, statistics, and standings to consistently make accurate predictions as to those teams who make it all the way to the World Series — let alone win the event. However, on August 14th of this year, I wrote a text message to a friend that read, “My prediction for the World Series 2017, although it’s still early: Dodgers vs. Astros.” As a Los Angeles native, there is no doubt that my hope — based on their outstanding record — was that the Dodgers would play in the series. Here we are today: game 2 ended last night in the 11th inning with the Astros winning the game and the series tied 1-1. Both games 1 and 2 were exhilarating and a number of my friends in L.A. were fortunate to attend and share the excitement with me through sounds and images. We are all saddened by what occurred in Houston this year and I do wish the Astros the best. Nonetheless, I cannot deny that I would love to see the L.A. Dodgers win the series. Go Dodgers! Francesco Zamboni, ATI Courses

Examples Of Before and After Imagery That Can Assist In Response Recovery and Rebuilding Operation Planning and Assessment.

As Hurricane Irma churned through the Caribbean and up Florida’s coast,   satellites have been capturing high-resolution images of the storm’s damage. Imaging in the Caribbean became possible over the weekend as the clouds moved out of the area. Before-and-after imagery taken between Friday, Sept. 8 and Sept. 11 of several places in the Caribbean: Tortola, […]
As Hurricane Irma churned through the Caribbean and up Florida’s coast,   satellites have been capturing high-resolution images of the storm’s damage. Imaging in the Caribbean became possible over the weekend as the clouds moved out of the area. Before-and-after imagery taken between Friday, Sept. 8 and Sept. 11 of several places in the Caribbean: Tortola, Turks and Caicos, St Maarten, Necker Island, Barbuda and Saint Martin. The “after” images were taken by Digital Globe’s WorldView-3, WorldView-2 and GeoEye-1 satellites. Digital Globe has also publicly released pre- and post-event satellite imagery of the areas affected by Hurricane Irma through our Open Data Program, which provides imagery to support recovery efforts in the wake of large-scale natural disasters. Humanitarian Open Street Map Team (HOT) set up mapping tasks for Irma using Digital Globe imagery in preparation for the storm. Additional tasks will be established once more post-event imagery is available, as will a Tomnod crowd sourcing campaign.   Port Barbuda PortBarbudaPost StMaartenPreStMaartenPostPhotos credit to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration/Department of Commerce.

Updates on GOVERNMENT SHUTDOWN: U.S. BUDGET CRISIS LOOMS (AGAIN IN FY 2018)

Applied Technology Institute (ATICourses) provides a variety of technical training courses on Space, Satellite, Radar, Defense, Engineering, Systems Engineering, and Sonar.  Now is the time to plan your training! This updates an 8/18/2017 post. Unfortunately, the shutdown risk has grown! This is a good article about the economic cost of a federal shutdown. It provides many […]
Government-ShutdownApplied Technology Institute (ATICourses) provides a variety of technical training courses on Space, Satellite, Radar, Defense, Engineering, Systems Engineering, and Sonar.  Now is the time to plan your training! This updates an 8/18/2017 post. Unfortunately, the shutdown risk has grown! This is a good article about the economic cost of a federal shutdown. It provides many detailed examples of the costs of the shutdown caused by the failure of the federal government to act in a timely way due to the shutdown. https://chiefhro.com/ Jeff Neal was the chief human capital officer at the Homeland Security Department and the chief human resources officer at the Defense Logistics Agency. Planning training and travel for FY 2018 could be tricky if there is a government shutdown of unknown duration. Many of the people that ATI has talked to have “no remaining FY 2017 training funds and have no idea what training budget will be in the FY 2018”. The last government shutdown occurred in 2013. The 16-day-long shutdown of October 2013 was the third-longest government shutdown in U.S. history, after the 18-day shutdown in 1978 and the 21-day 1995–96 shutdown. ATI was conducting training in 1995-1996. The 1995 shut-down was chaos. The last time sequestration kicked in 2013, it forced many federal agencies to furlough employees, costing them up to 20 percent of their salary during the furlough period.  Fortunately, all the government employees were eventually paid their full salary. Paying employees to not work and then rush to catch-up is a wasteful government practice. Many had to struggle until the late salary pay was received. Standard & Poor’s estimated that the 2013 shutdown took $24 billion out of the U.S. economy, and reduced projected fourth-quarter GDP growth from 3 percent to 2.4 percent. Even after the shutdown was over there was confusion for several months as employees talked about the shutdown and tried to get all the affected programs back on track. Small businesses and tourist locations lost money that was never recovered. Training and travel funds were devastated for most of the year in 1995 and 2013.  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_federal_government_shutdown_of_2013 Congress must pass a new government funding bill by Sept. 30 to prevent a shutdown on Oct. 1, which is when fiscal 2018 begins. In previous years, because of the limited amount of time on Capitol Hill in September, lawmakers have been forced to pass a continuing resolution (CR) to keep the government running for a few more months. This year could be different. “Build that wall,” Mr. Trump said. “Now the obstructionist Democrats would like us not to do it. But believe me, if we have to close down our government, we’re building that wall.” We’re months away from agreeing on the annual budget, and if Congress and President Trump fail to appropriate funds, government departments won’t be able to spend money. This means contractors won’t get paid. “If the budget debate gets ugly, which is a clear possibility, we could see the stock shares weaken in September, and then potentially rebound fairly quickly with the conclusion of (or lack of) any shutdown, as was the case in 2013,” Wells Fargo analyst Ed Caso wrote in a Thursday note. See this link for continuing news updates on the potential 2017 shutdown. https://federalnewsradio.com/federal-report/2017/08/one-less-thing-to-worry-about-furloughs/ What Could Happen? During the federal shutdown of 2013, contractor stocks fell as much as 6 percent, while annual revenue and earnings per share were estimated to average a 1- to 1.5-percent hit, according to Wells Fargo. IFCI also lowered guidance. But this year’s shocks could be amplified. “We should note that in 2013 the defense sector was at through EV/EBITDA (enterprise value to earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation, and amortization) multiples, while now they are in the upper quartile suggesting the potential for more volatility,” Caso wrote. But How Worried Should We Be? Given the current political climate, Caso considers a one-day shutdown possible and a multi-day shutdown modestly likely. Still, the caprice of the Trump administration merits preparation. “The political calculus, in our view, is even more unstable than in 2013, so uncertainty going into GFY end (September) should only be higher even with the memory that no one gained politically from the 2013 shutdown,” he wrote. Additionally, the drastic budget changes proposed could sustain debate more contentious than that driving the previous 16-day shutdown. Government agencies and employees do not know how to plan training and travel. Confusion will result for several months.

Government Shutdown: U.S. Budget Crisis Looms (Again)

Applied Technology Institute (ATICourses) provides a variety of technical training courses on Space, Satellite, Radar, Defense, Engineering, Systems Engineering, and Sonar.  Now is the time to get your training! Last government shutdown has occurred in 2013.  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_federal_government_shutdown_of_2013 We’re months away from the annual budget deadline, and if Congress and President Donald Trump fail to appropriate […]
Applied Technology Institute (ATICourses) provides a variety of technical training courses on Space, Satellite, Radar, Defense, Engineering, Systems Engineering, and Sonar.  Now is the time to get your training! Last government shutdown has occurred in 2013.  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_federal_government_shutdown_of_2013 We’re months away from the annual budget deadline, and if Congress and President Donald Trump fail to appropriate funds, government departments won’t be able to spend money. This means contractors won’t get paid. “If the budget debate gets ugly, which is a clear possibility, we could see the shares weaken in September, and then potentially rebound fairly quickly with the conclusion of (or lack of) any shutdown, as was the case in 2013,” Wells Fargo analyst Ed Caso wrote in a Thursday note. However, those with fixed-price contracts, higher exposure to the Defense or Homeland Security Departments, or more off-site work are considered to be at a lesser risk.

What Could Exactly Happen?

During the federal shutdown of 2013, contractor stocks fell as much as 6 percent, while annual revenue and earnings per share were estimated to average a 1- to 1.5-percent hit, according to Wells Fargo. IFCI also lowered guidance. But this year’s shocks could be amplified. “We should note that in 2013 the sector was at through EV/EBITDA (enterprise value to earnings before interest, taxes, depreciation, and amortization) multiples, while now they are in the upper quartile suggesting the potential for more volatility,” Caso wrote.

But How Worried Should We Be?

Given the current political climate, Caso considers a one-day shutdown possible and a multi-day shutdown modestly likely. Still, the caprice of the Trump administration merits preparation. “The political calculus, in our view, is even more unstable than in 2013, so uncertainty going into GFYend (September) should only be higher even with the memory that no one gained politically from the 2013 shutdown,” he wrote. Additionally, the drastic budget changes proposed could sustain debate more contentious than that driving the previous 16-day shutdown.  

Fun Fishing Times On Chesapeake Bay!

Jim Jenkins and Ed McCarthy (and families) from ATIcourses.com went fishing on May 24, 2017. They left from Chesapeake Beach, Maryland . It was a clear, sunny day. The fishing was great. Bunch of rockfish (also known as striped bass) were caught in about 6 hours. The striped bass, named the official fish of the State […]
Jim Jenkins and Ed McCarthy (and families) from ATIcourses.com went fishing on May 24, 2017. They left from Chesapeake Beach, Maryland . It was a clear, sunny day. The fishing was great. Bunch of rockfish (also known as striped bass) were caught in about 6 hours. The striped bass, named the official fish of the State of Maryland in 1965, gets its name from the seven or eight dark stripes that run from head to tail. The fish has an olive green back, fading to light silver on its sides, with a white underside. Known for its size and ability to put up a good fight, the striped bass is considered by many to be the premier sport fish on the Bay. It is also mighty tasty.

Stunning Space Station photo of glowing auroras

NASA has released an amazing photo show by Expedition 50 Flight Engineer Thomas Pesquet of the European Space Agency, who photographed bright auroras from the International Space Station on March 27, 2017. “The view at night recently has been simply magnificent: few clouds, intense auroras. I can’t look away from the windows,” Pesquet wrote in […]
Expedition 50 Flight Engineer Thomas Pesquet of the European Space Agency (ESA) photographed brightly glowing auroras from his vantage point aboard the International Space Station on March 27, 2017. (ESA/NASA)
Expedition 50 Flight Engineer Thomas Pesquet of the European Space Agency (ESA) photographed brightly glowing auroras from his vantage point aboard the International Space Station on March 27, 2017. (ESA/NASA)
NASA has released an amazing photo show by Expedition 50 Flight Engineer Thomas Pesquet of the European Space Agency, who photographed bright auroras from the International Space Station on March 27, 2017. “The view at night recently has been simply magnificent: few clouds, intense auroras. I can’t look away from the windows,” Pesquet wrote in a tweet that included the image. Here’s what NASA wrote about the image: “The dancing lights of the aurora provide stunning views, but also capture the imagination of scientists who study incoming energy and particles from the sun. Aurora are one effect of such energetic particles, which can speed out from the sun both in a steady stream called the solar wind and due to giant eruptions known as coronal mass ejections or CMEs.’ Check out more images from NASA’s Aurora Image Gallery

OUR MOON QUIETLY GROWS TO SUPERMOON SIZE

  Tom Logsdon “Hi diddle diddle, The cat and the fiddle, The cow jumped over the moon. The little dog laughed, To see such fun, And the dish ran away with the spoon.” My mother taught me that playful English nursery rhyme when I was about nine years old.. Notice how the poet who wrote […]
  Tom Logsdon “Hi diddle diddle, The cat and the fiddle, The cow jumped over the moon. The little dog laughed, To see such fun, And the dish ran away with the spoon.” My mother taught me that playful English nursery rhyme when I was about nine years old.. Notice how the poet who wrote it couldn’t think of anything more fanciful than having a living, breathing creature ending up in the vicinity of the moon! It took 300,000 of us a full decade of very hard work, but we did it! We sent two dozen astronauts on the adventure of a lifetime and we brought all of them back alive. In 1961 President John F. Kennedy, youthful and exuberant and brimming over with confidence, announced to the world that America’s scientists and engineers would—within a single decade —land a man on the moon and return him safely to the earth. No cows need apply. But potential human astronauts were bigly and hugely enthusiastic about their new opportunity to fly through space to a different world. By using the math and physics we had learned in school, we covered hundreds of pages with with cryptic mathematical symbols to work out the details down to a gnat’s eyebrow. We ended up hurling 24 American astronauts into the vicinity of the moon!. 12 of them “kangaroo hopped“ on its surface. Earlier this month, when the moon grew to its maximum apparent size, we were all reminded of the excitement we felt during Project Apollo. Of course, the size of the moon did not actually change, it merely moved up to its point of closest approach. Systematic perturbations on the moon’s orbit coupled with rhythmic variations in its distance from the Earth as it traveled around its elliptical orbit resulted in surprisingly large variations in its apparent size and its brightness as seen from the Earth. These distance variations, in turn, cause its observed diameter and its brightness to vary by as much as 15 and 30 percent, respectively. When the moon approaches its maximum apparent size and brightness, it is characterized as a supermoon. The biggest and brightest supermoons are spaced out several decades apart. My son, Chad, who participates in Special Olympics, used his cellphone camera to create the two photographs that accompany this blog. He took the first picture at the crack of dawn when the moon reached its maximum diameter at the edge of the parking lot at the Embassy Suites Hotel in Lexington, Kentucky (population 360,000). He made the second photograph 12 hours later in my hometown of Springfield, Kentucky, ((population 2900). That second picture was made on a small roadside hill beside the Bardstown Road above the IGA Supermarket within sight of the yellow blinker light at the edge of town. Author and short-course instructor, Tom Logsdon, who wrote this article, teaches the Launch and Orbital Mechanics short course for The Applied Technology Institute. Click here for more information on that course. He also teaches the GPS and Its International Competitors short course. Click here for more information.

Super-Moon Photos and Facts

One of the super-moon photos is a humorous hoax. Can you spot it? We knew that ATI’s instructors are world-class experts. They are the best in the business, averaging 25 to 35 years of experience, and are carefully selected for their ability to explain advanced technology in a readily understandable manner. We did not know […]
One of the super-moon photos is a humorous hoax. Can you spot it? We knew that ATI’s instructors are world-class experts. They are the best in the business, averaging 25 to 35 years of experience, and are carefully selected for their ability to explain advanced technology in a readily understandable manner. We did not know that many are talented photographers. We challenged them to take some photographs of the November 13-14 super-moon.  See our previous post and then the resulting photographs. http://www.aticourses.com/blog/index.php/2016/11/13/get-your-camera-ready-super-moon-november-13-14/ Tom Logsdon, who teaches Orbital & Launch Mechanics – Fundamentals provided us some of the orbits key parameters. Here are the best, most appropriate, average orbital parameters for Earth’s. perigee radius: 363,300 Km (for the super-moon it was 356,508 Km (or 221,524 miles) apogee radius: 405,400 Km Inclination to the ecliptic plane: 5.145 deg (the plane containing the Earth and the moon) orbital eccentricity: 0. 0549 (sometimes quoted as 5.49 percent) recession rate from the Earth: 3.8 cm/yr Siderial month: 27.3 days Synodic month: 29.5 days ( the sidereal month is the time it takes for the moon to make one 360 deg trip around the earth; the synodic month is the month we observe from the spinning earth…it involves a few extra degrees of travel beyond the sidereal month) Dr. Peter Zipfel Shalimar, Florida

  Dr. Peter Zipfel

Six Degree of Freedom Modeling of Missile and Aircraft Simulations

Aerospace Simulations In C++

  James  Jenkins, Riva, MD

Sonar Signal Processing

 Matt Moran, Windsor, Ontario, Canada

Engineering Systems Modeling with Excel / VBA

Thermal & Fluid Systems Modeling

  Matt Moran, Windsor, Ontario, Canada

Richard Carande, Denver, CO

Fundamentals of Synthetic Aperture Radar

Advanced Synthetic Aperture Radar

Richard Carande, Denver, CO

The photos that beat them all! Taken by the wife or Matt Moran

Highlights from a Recent INCOSE Gathering

On Monday, September 19th, I attended an INCOSE gathering. It was organized by the Chesapeake Chapter of Women in Systems Engineering (WISE), with a presentation by Courtney Wright, who is an SEP-Acq. Ms. Wright gave an overview of the INCOSE Certification Program, focused primarily on the growth of the program and the benefits of certification. […]
On Monday, September 19th, I attended an INCOSE gathering. It was organized by the Chesapeake Chapter of Women in Systems Engineering (WISE), with a presentation by Courtney Wright, who is an SEP-Acq. Ms. Wright gave an overview of the INCOSE Certification Program, focused primarily on the growth of the program and the benefits of certification. Since I am responsible for marketing and business development efforts in Canada and overseas, there were several interesting data points, which I caught my attention and that I would like to share:
  • Applicants have 1 year from the time of their application is received to complete their certification.
  • A CSEP is valid for 3 years, while an ASEP is valid for 5 years. An ESEP, which is the highest level of certification is valid indefinitely.
  • The top 6 organizations with active SEPs are:
    1. Airbus
    2. Lockheed Martin
    3. Booz Allen Hamilton
    4. Northrop Grumman
    5. Thales
    6. Honeywell
  • Out of approximately 10,000 INCOSE members, approximately 2,600 (or 26%) are SEPs.
  • A steady growth of active SEPs was reported from 2004 to present day.
ATI provides in-classroom, instructor-led CSEP course for those individuals who prefer this format: http://www.aticourses.com/CSEP_preparation.htm One reason why the Applied Technology Institute (ATI) also provides an online instructor-led ASEP and CSEP course that allows those systems engineers, who wish to take and pass the exam, a flexible alternative and the option the study at their own pace.   http://aticourses.com/ASEP_CSEP_Preparation.html