Tag Archives: Professional Development

You decide – The Best Technical Training for You!

 

 

You can make a difference. Applied Technology Institute is scheduling new courses for September 2016 through July 2017. Please let us know which courses you would like to see on our schedule or brought to your facility.

·         If you have a group of 3 or more people, ATI can schedule an open enrollment course in your geographic area.

·         If you have a group of 8 or more, ATI can schedule a course on-site at your facility.

On-site training brings our experts to you — on your schedule, at your location. It also allows us to plan your training in advance and tailor classes directly to your needs.

You can help identify courses to suit your training needs and bring the best short courses to you! ATI courses can help you stay up-to-date with today’s rapidly changing technology.

Boost your career. Courses are led by world-class design experts. Learn from the proven best.

ATI courses by technical area:

Satellites & Space-Related courses

Acoustic & Sonar Engineering courses

Engineering & Data Analysis courses

Radar, Missiles and Combat Systems courses

Project Management and Systems Engineering courses

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Contact us: ATI@ATIcourses.com or (410) 956-8805


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Do You Get Shaken and Stirred with MIL-STD-810G?

Negative Stiffness Vibration Isolator
Video Clip: Click to Watch
ATI’S MILITARY STANDARD 810G (MIL-STD-810G) TESTING COURSE

The course emphasizes topics you will use immediately. Suppliers to the military services protectively install commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) equipment in our flight and land vehicles and in shipboard locations where vibration and shock can be severe

This four-day class will provide education in the purpose of each test, the equipment required to perform each test, and the methodology to correctly apply the specified test environments. Vibration and Shock methods will be covered together and will include an overview of Sine and Random Vibration as well as classical waveform shock testing, drop testing and Shock Response Spectrum Testing. Instrumentation, vibration equipment, control systems and fixture design will be covered.

Each climatic test will be discussed individually, focusing on requirements, origination, equipment required, test methodology and understanding of results. Class members will participate in a tour of a lab that daily performs the full spectrum of 810G tests. Class discussion will be supported by projected visuals and video clips.

Commencing with a review of basic vibrations, we will explore vibration measurements and analysis. We’ll compare sinusoidal vs. random vibration testing systems, specifications, standards and procedures. We will emphasize vibration and shock test fixture design, fabrication, experimental evaluation and usage. We will study shock measurement, shock response spectrum (SRS) and shock testing.

Climatic testing will be looked at in great detail, emphasizing required equipment and instrumentation, correct interpretation of specifications and hints to ensure that the tests are brought to a successful conclusion. We laboratory test the protected equipment (1) to assure twenty years equipment survival and possible combat, also (2) to meet commercial test standards, IEC documents, military standards such as STANAG or MIL-STD-810G, etc.

What you will learn:

• perform vibration, shock and climatic tests

• evaluate and select equipment to perform testing

• convert field measured data into a test program,

• interpret vibration and shock test requirements and results,

• supervise vibration, shock and climatic tests,

• specify and experimentally evaluate vibration and shock test fixtures

When you visit a test lab or review a test program, you will have a good understanding of the requirements and execution of dynamics and climatics tests and so be able to ask meaningful questions and understand laboratory personnel responses.

If you are in need of more technical training, then boost your career with the knowledge needed to provide better, faster, and cheaper solutions for sophisticated DoD and NASA systems. Why not take a short course instead?

ATI short courses are less than a week long and are designed to help you keep your professional knowledge up-to-date. Our courses provide a practical overview of space and defense technologies which provide a strong foundation for understanding the issues that must be confronted in the use, regulation and development of complex systems.

Course Outline, Samplers, and Notes

After attending the course you will receive a full set of detailed notes from the class for future reference, as well as a certificate of completion. Each participant will also receive a copy of Wayne Tustin’s text ‘A Minimal-Mathematics Introduction to the Fundamentals of Random Vibration and Shock Testing, HALT, ESS & HASS, also Measurements, Analysis & Calibration’, including a CD containing a number of video clips pertaining to sine and random vibration and shock behavior and testing.

Please visit our website for more valuable information.

About ATI and the Instructor

Our mission here at ATI is to provide expert training and the highest quality professional development in space, communications, defense, sonar, radar, and signal processing. We are not a one-size-fits-all educational facility. Our short classes include both introductory and advanced courses. ATI’s instructors are world-class experts who are the best in the business. They are carefully selected for their ability to clearly explain advanced technology.

Steve Brenner has been working in the field of environmental simulation and reliability testing for over 30 years. Beginning in the late sixties with reliability and design verification testing on the Lunar Module, the Space Shuttle in the eighties, to semiconductor manufacturing equipment in the nineties, Mr. Brenner has always been involved with the latest techniques for verifying equipment integrity through testing.

Mr. Brenner began his career as an Environmental test engineer with Grumman Aerospace Corporation in New York, worked as design verification and reliability engineer for the Air Force, an Environmental Test Engineer for Lockheed Missiles and Space company, and spent 18 years with Kaiser Electronics in San Jose, where he managed the Environmental Test Lab and was involved with the design of hardware intended for severe environments. Mr. Brenner has been working as a consultant in the reliability testing field since 1996.

Times, Dates, and Locations

For the times, dates and locations of all of our short courses, please access the links below.

Nov 1-4, 2011 Cincinnatti, OH

Nov 14-17, 2011 Jupiter, FL

Dec 5-8, 2011 Santa Clarita, CA


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ATI’s Space Industry Professionals Weigh-In: Obama’s Decision to End NASA’s Constellation Program (Part 3)

Please click here for previous parts of this post Part 1 Part 2

Undecided explanatory comments of how this change will affect NASA and Manned space exploration:
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“There are many who believe, some passionately, that most of NASA’s money spent on manned space flight has been a waste. Robotic space has high pay-offs, at far less bucks for the results. Manned (and even that term is not PC) space flight has been a massive make-work program for a few privileged companies. Romantic, yes. Eye-candy, yes. Spectacular, yes. Sometimes of political advantage, yes. Sensible, in the larger scheme of things? Now that would be worth serious debate.”


ATI encourages further participation from both the public and private sectors to continue this important and controversial debate.


ATI is planning a follow-up poll after the President’s April 15th conference on NASA’s future where he will outline his strategy for the next step in space exploration. Jenkins says, “It will be interesting to see if any opinions shift after the President details his strategy for the future of space, since those details have yet to be presented beyond his 2011 Fiscal Budget Plan.”


The Applied Technology Institute (ATI) specializes in professional development seminars in the technical areas of space, communications, defense, sonar, radar, and signal processing. For over twenty-five years, ATI has presented leading-edge technical training to defense and NASA facilities, as well as DoD and aerospace contractors. ATI courses provide a clear understanding of the fundamental principles and a working knowledge of current technology and applications. ATI has the unique capability to schedule and deliver courses in a matter of weeks. They offer customized on-site training at your facility anywhere in the United States, as well as internationally and over 200 annual public courses in dozens of locations. World-class design experts lead courses. To register or for an on-site quote, call (888) 501-2100, or visit them on the web at www.ATIcourses.com

ATI’s Space Industry Professionals Weigh-In: Obama’s Decision to End NASA’s Constellation Program (Part 2)

For Part 1 of this post please click here

Explanatory comments in opposition of how this change will affect NASA and Manned space exploration:


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“The new Obama space plan will definitely hurt manned space exploration. In this area, as in others, Obama is a leader who lacks vision.”


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“The Obama space plan doesn’t appear to be a plan at all. He apparently wants to eliminate existing plans to use the Moon as a staging area for future space exploration, while at the same time eliminating heavy-lift launch capability. That would be the death-knell for future manned space exploration.”
“Although unmanned scientific space missions would continue under the Obama plan, it is not clear how much support unmanned missions would receive in the future. Obama is of the opinion that the U.S. space program has had low return on investment. That notion is standard liberal poppycock. Estimates of the net loss in jobs (5000 – 7000 jobs lost) are probably low. The actual net job loss would likely approach 10,000.”


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“I believe we need to maintain the space program at this current level at the least. That includes launching, space science and the manned space program using our own launcher. I do not believe it is good policy to rely on the Russians to put us in space.
“No, I do not support that plan.”


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“No….I feel this will put an end to manned space flight outside of LEO for the US. Doesn’t bode well for servicing mission to the Webb Telescope (that would be a know need), let alone any further exploration and experience outside of LEO. There is no money in the budget to pursue both, technology leaps would have occurred if they were remotely feasible. It is a tremendous waste of taxpayers’ money and the skilled workforce will take a generation to recover if this in fact happens, as the Aerospace and NASA industry is already aging.”


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“NO. The way forward is ill-advised. Many programs now mentioned in the President’s budget are low-hanging fruit, having been worked on within NASA for years and should now be given to the commercial world. NASA should keep in part Human Spaceflight (HSF) as a major infrastructure issue, not unlike highway and air traffic systems. The US government must stay involved for development in a safe and sustained way (when BIG government works best) without competing with commercial space market. It is good to have commercial know-how, but for the overarching system, the US government must provide goals and leadership in concert with the desires of the nation. The NASA budget is very modest compared to expenditures of recent Administration commitments, and a parallel manned system to commercial HSF systems is the way to maintain American manned access to space. The AF has assured access to space through EELV. Surely another government agency should ensure human access to space. It seems that NASA has now trepidation for the future of human spaceflight and space development, so perhaps another civil agency such as the FAA Office of Commercial Space should undertake this bold challenge (?) to balance both commercial and civil HSF systems ensuring our (US) economic growth in space. The US is the only country with budgets large enough to do the tough infrastructure development that lay the foundation for the economic development of space—from which later the American economy can be rewarded. There will be no quick ROI from space—more of long term growth, long term development (10-20 years), with funding consistency, like the utilities industry. And funding must remain predictable and consistent for commercial planning purposes. The question should be ‘Is NASA able to give consistent and solid leadership to continue our American heritage in space?’—manned, unmanned, and safe? And a question for later, how will the commercial development of space be protected from pirates, terrorists, space debris, sabotage, early warning of solar and radiation effects, which provide other opportunities for entrepreneurial developments. This year NASA is losing its importance as a global leader in space exploration at its own hand. Commitments made and not followed through, and a past history of elbowing the US industry out of ‘competition’ has hurt the NASA image. So less government commitment for space exploration is occurring as a solution. NASA should look internally to understand this failure. I am reminded of Apollo 13 and how failure then was never considered an option, against all odds. And yet here we are—NASA withdrawing in failure. Failure to stand up and fight for the budgets it requires to ‘do the hard things’. NASA in the past has competed with the commercial space launch business and industry scientists and PI’s, and would not fund commercial ideas—but they would take commercial concepts for their own without cutting out work for the originator of the idea . This created a reluctance to partner with NASA and dependence and reliance on NASA and only NASA–within the nation and world-wide—for programs which NASA could not deliver at costs they could not determine and later could not afford. NASA has defeated free market access and commercial enterprise interest in space development for years although persistence and unlimited private funding has begun to grow this market segment even before the Augustine panels and report. NASA created a dependence on solely themselves for manned access to space, access to ISS for the US and the world (solely through the Russians or NASA), SCRAMJET technology development through them, data from any sensors in solar system explorations and earth remote sensors only built by them and collected by them (JPL is NASA). With so much now depending on ‘them’, the President by advice of OSTP and NASA top management has decided to abdicate. NASA as an agency should have been in commercial partnerships all along. Now is not the time to withdraw from manned spaceflight leadership. We still need an alternative to the commercial spaceliners. And there was a successful demonstration on October 28, 2009 of a system that can parallel commercial market development. A major mishap will set back the commercial side of a manned program. Big government has to remain in the game to keep the manned space efforts filled with substance safely. These programs belong to the American taxpayer regardless of whether NASA funds commercial business or does it themselves. If anyone with an ‘inside the beltway’ address will be open to hear, maybe the taxpayer should decide the priorities for funding. For the billions of dollars in funding that NASA has received in the last 3 decades, there is little space transportation growth to show except for science projects to Mars and the outer planets. Manned spaceflight has been stuck in LEO. And it will take manned spaceflight to grow a viable economy in space. It will take NASA in partnership with the innovation of industry to ‘unstick’ us safely out of earth orbit in order to visit our solar system and learn more about potential threats outside of earth’s magnetosphere. And both NASA and the commercial space efforts need sustained and predictable funding for years to come to be successful.”


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“Working in this industry here at Cape Canaveral Florida, I know the dedication of the work force and the passion for what is done. We follow in the legacy of the “Steely-eyed Missile Men” that achieve the greatest feat of the 20th Century, landing a man on the moon. Look at the technology that came from that effort in just a short 10 year time span. Technology that the planet runs on everyday. We created, built, and integrated that technology that achieved a goal landing in the Moon within a ten year period. Even though we may not be at the pinnacle of that feat now, we never the less still need to at least continue to provide our (the United States) own transportation to the International Space Station. Going back to the Moon may not be a high priority right now, so why not scale back Constellation to provide assured access to the space and keep our experienced work force intact to help build the future of human space flight. But to stop dead in your tracks and start all over is wrong and then to rely on the Russian to provide transportation to the Space Station, ironically in a rocket that traces it heritage back to Sputnik! Yes, the Russian have relied on ONE launch vehicle for human space flight over the past 50 years, even though they failed at a few others. The United States has used six different launch vehicles over that same 50 year period and by the end of this year we will have NOTHING to fly to space and no capability of resurrecting any of those past 6 vehicles to get up to orbit. Even though ARES-1 isn’t the best option, NASA should reorganize and expedite the ARES-1 and Orion development to become strictly an ISS transportation vehicle. Then build off of their lessons learned as to develop the future manned spacecraft and launch vehicles. I grew up with the space program, watching the Apollo missions on TV as a kid and it was those conquests and achievements that encouraged me to become an engineer. But now we’ll have nothing for the future generation to watch, admire, and to encourage them to pursue math and technology in school. Ask them who invented the technology for their fancy video games, they’ll say the Japanese. They don’t even now that the origins of integrated circuit is America’s Space Program. We need something for those kid to see and encourage them, watching a rocket the Americans designed and built flying to space will interest them more than some 100 page report from some PhD on the next manned spacecraft design, filled with “if we do this” or “if we do that” statements. Not sure what the future generation will want to be when they grow up, but chances are it won’t be mathematicians and engineers. So we’ll have to rely on the countries to fill those jobs just like we’ll rely on Russia to take US Astronauts to the ISS… BUT AT LEAST WE’LL HAVE HEALTH CARE!”
“White House plans to cancel the Constellation moon rocket program could jeopardize U.S. leadership in space exploration. Criticism, from both Republicans and Democrats, underscores the difficulty that President Barack Obama faces in convincing Congress of his plan, which would terminate Constellation and instead rely on commercial rockets or on Russia to ferry astronauts to the International Space Station. “It could leave our country with no human exploration program, no human-rated spacecraft and little ability to inspire the youth of America,” said U.S. Rep. Gabrielle Giffords, the Arizona Democrat who chairs the House subcommittee on Space and Aeronautics.”


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“The plan to go to Mars and abandon the moon will put manned exploration beyond low earth orbit behind by 2-3 decades. The VASIMR propulsion technology is decades away from being able to send any appreciable mass to the red planet. Nuclear reactors in space needed for the VASIMR plasma engine have been abandoned since the seventies and need to be reconstituted needing significant time to get to a working level for either test or even flight. Without Constellation there will be no capsules or other manned craft for an appreciable time. No heavy lift vehicle is even close to the drawing board as well. It is a presidential blunder of enormous magnitude – on scale with the unilateral decision to invade Iraq.”

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ATI encourages further participation from both the public and private sectors to continue this important and controversial debate.


ATI is planning a follow-up poll after the President’s April 15th conference on NASA’s future where he will outline his strategy for the next step in space exploration. Jenkins says, “It will be interesting to see if any opinions shift after the President details his strategy for the future of space, since those details have yet to be presented beyond his 2011 Fiscal Budget Plan.”

The Applied Technology Institute (ATI) specializes in professional development seminars in the technical areas of space, communications, defense, sonar, radar, and signal processing. For over twenty-five years, ATI has presented leading-edge technical training to defense and NASA facilities, as well as DoD and aerospace contractors. ATI courses provide a clear understanding of the fundamental principles and a working knowledge of current technology and applications. ATI has the unique capability to schedule and deliver courses in a matter of weeks. They offer customized on-site training at your facility anywhere in the United States, as well as internationally and over 200 annual public courses in dozens of locations. World-class design experts lead courses. To register or for an on-site quote, call (888) 501-2100, or visit them on the web at www.ATIcourses.com

Bottlenose dolphins mud-ring feeding

A pod of bottlenose dolphins off the coast of Florida have developed a remarkable hunting strategy in order to catch fish. Another awesome thing about this technique is that only one female in the pod can create this ring.


From the first episode (Challenges of Life) of the new BBC series Life.

ATI Addresses 60 Minutes Special on Cyber Warfare


Last night 60 Minutes on CBS reported on the very real and escalating threat of cyber warfare attacks. Interviews included top experts in national security, Mike McConnell, former vice admiral in the U.S. Navy and former Director of the National Security Agency, as well as Jim Lewis, Director at the Center for Strategic and International Studies, and Sandia’s James Gossler, a leading authority on cyber warfare strategies. They each emphasized the United States vulnerability to cyber warfare attacks, revealing serious breaches in both the government and private sector, affecting financial institutions, energy and transportation infrastructures and national security computers.

Watch the 60 minutes video now.
ATI’s new course, Theory and Fundamentals of Cyber Warfare is offered January 19-20 in Beltsville, MD. Seats are going quickly.

Register today to reserve your seat.

The Applied Technology Institute (ATI) announces a new two-day professional development short course, Theory and Fundamentals of Cyber Warfare, offered to the public on Jan 19-20, 2010 in Beltsville, Maryland. The course is offered in response to the growing need for businesses and military facilities to quickly gain an understanding of cyber threats and institute cyber security defenses. It is targeted especially to DoD analysts, specialists and engineers in security related facilities in the Washington, DC, Virginia and Maryland metro area, which has the largest concentration of DoD national security related facilities in the United States. Those facilities, along with the research and development contractors they work with, are building their resources to tackle the growing need for cyber security experts.

Cyber Warfare is all over news headlines. World leaders, including the United States, Russia, South Korea and Great Britain, are scrambling to organize against the rapidly increasing varieties of threats such as spyware and malware, spoofing, phishing and botnets that are having devastating effects around the world. Digital intelligence experts have labeled these escalating cyber threats as a “Global Cyber Cold War”.

The instructor for ATI’s new Theory and Fundamentals of Cyber Warfare course is Albert Kinney, who brings more than 20 years of experience in research and operational cyberspace mission areas including the initial development and first operational employment of the Naval Cyber Attack Team. Kinney says, “ I designed the course to focus on providing a top-down view of both the challenges and opportunities encountered in this new warfare domain. Attendees will gain insight to emerging requirements and trends affecting the implementation of cyber warfare systems, policy, and operations that will inform your strategy and focus your efforts in cyberspace.”

Maryland Governor, Martin O’Malley, was recently interviewed on 103.5 FM WTOP radio identifying Maryland as the next, “silicon valley” of cyber security. “Cyberspace has emerged as a mainstream warfare domain on par with air, land, sea, and space domains. This advancement to a bona fide battle space arises from the de facto behaviors of entities ranging from international superpowers to improvised non-state organizations. As a result, government and military organizations are developing new doctrines, establishing domain-focused operational hierarchies, and acquiring new systems capabilities to maintain cyberspace as a viable resource serving the national interest,” Kinney explains.

The topic of cyber security first gained momentum when President Obama announced in May that his administration will pursue a plan to secure America’s digital infrastructure and that, “Protecting this infrastructure will be a national security priority.” The President’s plan will involve nearly all sectors of local and national government and military.

Prospective attendees can view the full Theory and Fundamentals of Cyber Warfare course description by clicking on:
http://www.aticourses.com/theory_fundamentals_cyber_warfare.html
The Applied Technology Institute (ATI) specializes in professional development seminars in the technical areas of space, communications, defense, sonar, radar, and signal processing. For over twenty-five years, ATI has presented leading-edge technical training to defense and NASA facilities, as well as DoD and aerospace contractors. ATI courses provide a clear understanding of the fundamental principles and a working knowledge of current technology and applications. ATI has the unique capability to schedule and deliver courses in a matter of weeks. They offer customized on-site training at your facility anywhere in the United States, as well as internationally and over 200 annual public courses in dozens of locations. World-class design experts lead courses. To register or for an on-site quote, call (888) 501-2100, or visit them on the web at www.ATIcourses.com

SCHEMES FOR ENHANCING THE SATURN V MOON ROCKET TRANSLUNAR PAYLOAD CAPABILITY



Today virtually every large liquid rocket that flies into space takes advantage of the performance-enhancement techniques we pioneered in conjunction with the Apollo moon flights. NASA’s reusable space shuttle, for example, employs modern versions of optimal fuel biasing and postflight trajectory reconstruction. However, more of the critical steps are accomplished automatically by the computer.

Russia’s huge tripropellant rocket, which was designed to burn kerosene-oxygen early in its flight, the switch to hydrogen-oxygen for the last part, yields important performance gains for precisely the same reason the Programmed Mixture Ratio scheme did. In short, the fundamental ideas we pioneered are still providing a rich legacy for today’s mathematicians and rocket scientists most of whom have no idea how it all crystallized more that 40 years ago.

Illustration 1. below summarizes the performance gains and a sampling of the mathematical procedures we used in figuring out how to send 4700 extra pounds of payload to the moon on each of the manned Apollo missions. We achieved these performance gains by using a number of advanced mathematical techniques, nine of which are listed on the chart. No costly hardware changes were necessary. We did it all with pure mathematics!

In those days each pound of payload was estimated to be worth five times its weight in 24-karat gold. As the calculations in the box in the lower right-hand corner of Illustration 1. indicate, the total saving per mission amounted to $280 million, measured in 2009 dollars. And, since we flew nine manned missions from the earth to the moon, the total savings amounted to $2.5 billion in today’s purchasing power!

We achieved these savings by using advanced calculus, partial differential equations, numerical analysis, Newtonian mechanics, probability and statistics, the calculus of variations, non linear least squares hunting procedures, and matrix algebra. These were the same branches of mathematics that had confused us, separately and together, only a few years earlier at Eastern Kentucky University, the University of Kentucky, UCLA, and USC.

 

Illustration 1. Over a period of two years or so a small team of rocket scientists and mathematics used at least nine branches of advanced mathematics to increase the performance capabilities of the Saturn V moon rocket by more than 4700 pounds of translunar payload. As the calculations in the lower right-hand corner of this figure indicate, the net overall savings associated with the nine manned missions we flew to the moon totaled $2,500,000,000 in today’s purchasing power. These impressive performance gains were achieved with pure mathematical manipulations. No hardware modifications at all were required.

Read the full article here

Side Scan Sonar Technology with left and right side-viewing with up to 480 ft of underwater coverage


Lowrance announced today the premier of its next-generation sonar technology, the LSS-1 StructureScan(TM) sonar imaging module for Lowrance High Definition Systems (HDS), at ICAST 2009 in Orlando, Florida. Raising the bar in fish-finding technology, the sonar-imaging module is the world’s first to offer anglers a new dimension in underwater picture-like displays – side-to-side plus straight down, full panoramic viewing.

The innovative Lowrance StructureScan features a combination of SideScan and an exclusive new DownScan Imaging(TM) technology. SideScan provides full-screen left and right side-viewing with extra-crisp detail of up to 480 ft. (146 m) of underwater coverage that displays structure and fish targets, as well as their imaging-scan shadows. The new DownScan Imaging feature allows anglers, for the first time, to see submerged detail directly beneath their boats, providing a complete underwater picture in a screen format that is easy to interpret. With revolutionary on-screen display versatility, anglers can merge Lowrance side and down sonar scans in split-screen to view wide-area surveys and highly-defined detail. As a unique new tool, anglers can also compare DownScan Imaging with 2D sonar images in split-screen display to better distinguish fish from structure. Removing all of the guesswork common to existing fish-finding technology, the new LSS-1 delivers the highest underwater definition ever achieved with crystal-clear views in shallow and deep, freshwater or saltwater – even at speeds up to 30 mph.