Tag Archives: NOAA

Examples Of Before and After Imagery That Can Assist In Response Recovery and Rebuilding Operation Planning and Assessment.

As Hurricane Irma churned through the Caribbean and up Florida’s coast,   satellites have been capturing high-resolution images of the storm’s damage. Imaging in the Caribbean became possible over the weekend as the clouds moved out of the area.

Before-and-after imagery taken between Friday, Sept. 8 and Sept. 11 of several places in the Caribbean: Tortola, Turks and Caicos, St Maarten, Necker Island, Barbuda and Saint Martin. The “after” images were taken by Digital Globe’s WorldView-3, WorldView-2 and GeoEye-1 satellites.

Digital Globe has also publicly released pre- and post-event satellite imagery of the areas affected by Hurricane Irma through our Open Data Program, which provides imagery to support recovery efforts in the wake of large-scale natural disasters. Humanitarian Open Street Map Team (HOT) set up mapping tasks for Irma using Digital Globe imagery in preparation for the storm. Additional tasks will be established once more post-event imagery is available, as will a Tomnod crowd sourcing campaign.

 

Port Barbuda PortBarbudaPost StMaartenPreStMaartenPostPhotos credit to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration/Department of Commerce.

New NOAA ship helps gather data

NOAA’s newest ship, the “Hassler”, has some of the most sophisticated equipment available to collect that data.

The scientific research being done aboard the Hassler will have some very practical applications.

The “fish” being deployed into the water is actually a side-scanning sonar device that enables the team of scientists and NOAA officers to make a detailed survey of the sea floor.

“The side-scan is very important because it gives us a very high resolution picture of the sea-bed.  It allows us to clearly see obstructions and wrecks,” Lt. Cmdr. Ben Evans said.

And in shallow water it is capable of scanning a very wide area of the sea-floor. This data, along with depth readings from multi-beam sonar devices, is used by NOAA to produce maps and charts to guide merchant vessels transiting the port of Hampton Roads.

“The port is a huge economic engine for the area, so we want to make sure those container ships can come in fully loaded and know exactly how much water they have underneath of their hulls,” Andrew Larkin with NOAA said.

Keeping the maps and charts up to date is a constant process because like the crew of the Hassler, the sea floor is constantly on the move.

“The out-flow from rivers or storms can move the sand and mud in the area to the approaches of the Chesapeake Bay,” Larkin added. “Occasionally we’ll see things like wrecks, a ship could go down or a container could fall off a ship and block the channel.”

The technology aboard the Hassler enables scientists to find and record changes to the sea floor in a fraction of the time this process used to require.

“What used to take mariners with a sounding line, it would take em two minutes to do one sounding.  Now we’re doing 1,028 about 20-times a second,” David Moehl said.

In fact, the Hassler and her crew are gathering more data than was ever possible.


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Would you like to explore the Gulf with NOAA? Here is your chance!

Have you ever followed the adventures of Jacques Cousteau and dreamed to be among his team of ocean explorers? How exciting would that be to be able to join them through their daily task!

Now, thanks to National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) new program, you can!

From today through April 28, the public can watch live undersea video and listen in as ocean explorers at sea and ashore comment in real-time as they observe marine species, visit gas seeps and map poorly known areas of the northern Gulf of Mexico.

Through telepresence technology, satellite and high-speed Internet pathways between ship and shore, scientists ashore will view information from sensors and high-definition cameras as it is collected at sea, so they may help guide how the expedition unfolds. Using a computer or mobile device, the public can join the expedition as virtual explorers live online.

“Advances in technology help NOAA and our partners bring the excitement of exploring right into living rooms and classrooms across the globe — live!,” said Tim Arcano, director of NOAA’s Office of Ocean Exploration and Research. “It’s a great way for the public to be involved as virtual ocean explorers, especially as we explore our ocean planet during Earth Day, April 22.”

Though live streams will be sent from the ship 24 hours a day from now through April 28 , each day, weather permitting, the streams between 9 a.m. and 6 p.m. EDT will include video from high-definition cameras on the expedition’s undersea robots, called ROVs for remotely-operated vehicles. The ROVs send video images and sensor data to the ship to be relayed ashore by satellite.

The expedition is using NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer, which is equipped with a state-of-the-art multibeam mapping sonar; the Institute for Exploration’s Little Hercules ROV; and telepresence capability. Areas to be explored were first identified during a workshop in 2011 and were further refined during a series of mapping missions.

The expedition’s main objective is to explore poorly known regions of the Gulf of Mexico and to map and image unknown features and species. Another objective is to test a method using equipment mounted on the ROV to measure the rate that gas rises from seeps on the seafloor. During a cruise last year, NOAA and partners demonstrated the Okeanos Explorer’s multibeam sonar was capable of mapping gas seeps in the water column over broad areas and at high resolution. Testing new methods and technologies is a priority of NOAA’s Office of Ocean Exploration and Research.

The expedition has been underway since early April and areas exhibiting rich biodiversity have been discovered, including at the base of the West Florida Escarpment, an undersea cliff-like ridge, where explorers found a ‘forest’ of deep corals, several of which were new to scientists on the ship and ashore.

NOAA’s partners in the 2012 Gulf of Mexico expedition include the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement, College of Charleston, C&C Technologies, Florida Atlantic University, Geoscience Earth & Marine Services, Louisiana State University, Mississippi State University, Naval Historical Society, the NOAA Northern Gulf Institute , Pennsylvania State University, Temple University, Tesla Offshore LLC, the Institute for Exploration, University Corporation for Atmospheric Research Joint Office for Science Support, University of New Hampshire, University of Rhode Island, University of Texas at Austin, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, and multiple other NOAA partners. 

The Okeanos Explorer Program is the only federal program dedicated to systematic exploration of the planet’s largely unknown ocean. NOAA Ship Okeanos Explorer is operated, managed and maintained byNOAA’s Office of Marine and Aviation Operations which includes commissioned officers of the NOAA Corps and civilian wage mariners. NOAA’s Office of Ocean Exploration and Research, operates, manages and maintains the cutting-edge ocean exploration systems on the vessel and ashore including, the Institute for Exploration’s Little Hercules ROV, OER’s Camera Sled Seirios, a sonar mapping system, telepresence capability, exploration command centers ashore, and terrestrial high-speed communication networks.

NOAA’s mission is to understand and predict changes in the Earth’s environment, from the depths of the ocean to the surface of the sun, and to conserve and manage our coastal and marine resources.


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Is NPOESS (National Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite System) Preparatory Project (NPP) ready for launch? How do we find out?

What is NPOESS?

The National Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite System (NPOESS) was supposed to be the next generation satellite system for monitoring weather, atmosphere, oceans, land and near-space environment.  The first one, named “Charlie 1” (or “C1”) was scheduled to go up in 2013.NPOESS was to be operated by the NOAA / NESDIS / NPOESS Program Executive Office Flight Operations at the NOAA Satellite Operations Facility (NSOF) in Suitland, MD. Northrop Grumman Aerospace Systems (NGAS) was the primary system integrator for the NPOESS project. Raytheon, Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corp. and Boeing are developing the sensors.However, due to issues with sensor developments, multiple production delays and cost-overruns, the White House ordered the project to dissolve and split into two separate lines of polar-orbiting satellites to serve military and civilian users.

What is NPP?


NPP is the bridge between the original EOS missions and the Joint Polar Satellite System (JPSS). JPSS, previously called the National Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite System (NPOESS), will be developed by NASA for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).

When is NPP is supposed to be launched?

NPP is scheduled to launch into orbit from Vandenberg Air Force Base in southern California on October 25, 2011.

Is it ready to go?

It is, according to the number of tests that were performed (dynamic, electromagnetic compatibility, thermal vacuum, etc.)
You can read more detailed information on the tests performed here.

What do you think?  Is NPP ready for launch in October?


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Why Not a Short Technical Course for Your New Years Resolution?

ATI Short Courses Rock!
ATI Short Courses Rock!
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Why Not Make Yourself a New Year’s Resolution

which is Easy to Keep?

Making New Year’s resolutions is easy.

Keeping New Year’s resolutions is hard.

It doesn’t have to be hard.

While we can’t help you take those holiday pounds off, or reduce your holi-“daze” bills, we can help improve your career by keeping your professional knowledge up-to-date. Our short courses provide a clear understanding of fundamental principles and give you a better working knowledge of current technology and applications.

Since 1984, Applied Technology Institute (ATI) has provided leading-edge public courses and onsite technical training to DoD and NASA personnel, as well as contractors. ATI is the leading technical training organization specializing in short courses in space, communications, defense, sonar, radar, and signal processing.

Any ATI course can be customized and presented On Site at your location.

To make it easy to keep this New Year’s resolution, you can contact ATI in any one of five easy ways:

• Call toll free at 1-888-501-2100

• Visit us on the web at aticourses.com

• Send an email to ati@ATIcourses.com

• See the exclusive ATI channel on YouTube at ATI on YouTube

• Fax us your completed registration at 410-956-5785

ATI short courses are designed to help you keep your professional knowledge up-to-date. Our courses provide a practical overview of space and defense technologies which provide a strong foundation for understanding the issues that must be confronted in the use, regulation and development such complex systems.

Our short courses are designed for individuals involved in planning, designing, building, launching, and operating space and defense systems. Whether you are a busy engineer, a technical expert or a project manager, you can enhance your understanding of complex systems in a short time. You will become aware of the basic vocabulary essential to interact meaningfully with your colleagues.

Course Outline, Samplers, and Notes

Determine for yourself the value of our courses before you sign up. See our samples (See Slide Samples) on some of our courses.

Or check out the new ATI channel on YouTube.

After attending the course you will receive a full set of detailed notes from the class for future reference, as well as a certificate of completion. Please visit our website for more valuable information.

About ATI and Our Instructors

Our mission here at the ATI is to provide expert training and the highest quality professional development in space, communications, defense, sonar, radar, and signal processing. We are not a one-size-fits-all educational facility. Our short classes include both introductory and advanced courses.

ATI’s instructors are world-class experts who are the best in the business. They are carefully selected for their ability to clearly explain advanced technology.

Times, Dates and Locations

For the times, dates and locations of all of our technical short courses, please access the links below.

Sincerely,

The ATI Courses Team

P.S Call today for registration at 410-956-8805 or 888-501-2100 or access our website at www.ATIcourses.com. For general questions please email us at ATI@ATIcourses.com.

Mark N. Lewellen
Consultant/Instructor
Washington, DC
240-882-1234

Don’t be a S.H.E.E.P in 2011

Are you part of the herd?
Are you part of the herd?
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ATI short technical courses provide concise,

practical answers to put you ahead of the pack

Do you want your profession to stagnate next year?

Or would a short technical course advance your career?

Instead of doing the same thing, why not try something new?

Technical training: Could it be just the thing for you?

Since 1984, from the Applied Technology Institute (ATI) has provided leading-edge public courses and onsite technical training to DoD and NASA personnel, as well as contractors.

ATI short courses are designed to help you keep your professional knowledge up-to-date. Our courses provide a practical overview of space and defense technologies which provide a strong foundation for understanding the issues that must be confronted in the use, regulation and development such complex systems.

Whether you are a busy engineer, a technical expert or a project manager, you can enhance your understanding of complex systems in a short time. You will become aware of the basic vocabulary essential to interact meaningfully with your colleagues.

Course Outline, Samplers, and Notes

Determine for yourself the value of our courses before you sign up.

Check out the new ATI channel on YouTube.

Or see our samples (See Slide Samples) on some of our courses.

After attending the course you will receive a full set of detailed notes from the class for future reference, as well as a certificate of completion. Please visit our website for more valuable information.

About ATI and the Instructors

Our mission here at ATI is to provide expert training and the highest quality professional development in space, communications, defense, sonar, radar, and signal processing. We are not a one-size-fits-all educational facility. Our short classes include both introductory and advanced courses.

ATI’s instructors are world-class experts who are the best in the business. They are carefully selected for their ability to clearly explain advanced technology.

Dates, Times and Locations

For the dates and locations of all of our short courses, please access the links below.

Sincerely,

The ATI Courses Team

P.S. Call today for registration at 410-956-8805 or 888-501-2100 or access our website at www.ATIcourses.com. For general questions please email us at ATI@ATIcourses.com.

Mark N. Lewellen
Consultant/Instructor
Washington, DC
240-882-1234

Can You Pass the Certified Systems Engineers Professional (CSEP) Exam?

Will YOU be part of the supply?
Will YOU be part of the supply?
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Certified Systems Engineers Are In Demand

Just as you would not attempt a state bar exam without studying, you should not attempt the CSEP (Certified Systems Engineer Professional) exam without preparation. By taking a preparatory course, you can yield great benefits in performance, stress reduction and overall, greatly improve your chances of passing the exam.

While the economy is down, the demand for systems engineers is still growing — but supply is low. To assist you in your career, the Applied Technology Institute (ATI) has added a CSEP preparation course to its curriculum. Systems engineering is a profession, practice and way of doing business that concentrates on the design and application of the whole system to produce a successful product or system.

The International Council on Systems Engineering (INCOSE) has established a Professional Certification Program to provide a formal method for recognizing the knowledge and experience of systems engineers. The INCOSE CSEP rating is a coveted milestone in the career of a systems engineer, demonstrating knowledge, education and experience and is of high value to systems organizations.

Course Outline, Samplers, and Notes

Determine for yourself the value of our course before you sign up. For example click here to see our CSEP slide samples or click here to see ATI CSEP on YouTube.

After attending the course you will receive a full set of detailed notes from the class for future reference, as well as a certificate of completion. Please visit our website for more valuable information.

About ATI and the Instructors

The instructor for this class is Eric Honour, an international consultant and lecturer, who has nearly forty year career of complex systems development & operation. He was Founder and former President of INCOSE. He has led the development of eighteen major systems, including the Air Combat Maneuvering Instrumentation systems and the Battle Group Passive Horizon Extension System.

Dates, Times and Locations

The dates and locations for our CSEP courses in 2011 are listed here:

February 11-12, 2011, Orlando, FL

March 30-31, 2011, Minneapolis, MN

September 16, 2011, Chantilly, VA

For a complete ATI course list, please access the links below.

Sincerely,

The ATI Courses Team

P.S. Call today for registration at 410-956-8805 or 888-501-2100 or access our website at www.ATIcourses.com. For general questions please email us at ATI@ATIcourses.com.

Mark N. Lewellen
Consultant/Instructor
Washington, DC
240-882-1234