Tag Archives: cyber warfare

Cyber Warfare Is Bigger and Scarier Than You Think, Security Expert Says

170121-N-FI568-020 PENSACOLA, Fla. (Jan. 21, 2016) Cryptologic Technician (Networks) 1st Class Brandon Janice, a Joint Cyber Analysis Course instructor at Information Warfare Training Command (IWTC) Corry Station, helps a high school student, complete cybersecurity challenges during the third annual CyberThon event at Naval Air Station Pensacola. CyberThon provides northwest Florida high school and college students an opportunity to gain experience in cyber defense and engagement procedures under the instruction of active industry experts. IWTC Corry Station staff members volunteered to act as mentors for participating students. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Taylor L. Jackson/Released)
U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Taylor L. Jackson/Released

Applied Technology Institute (ATIcourses) offers a variety of courses on Cyber Security.  We thought the information below would be of interest to our readers.

Cyber Leader Course (CLC)

Cyber Security – Certified Ethical Hacker (CEH)

Cyber Warfare – Global Trends- D131

Of all the keynotes at this year’s t3 Enterprise conference in Las Vegas, the one most illuminating and alarming was delivered by Isaac Ben-Israel, the chairman of the Israel Space Agency and head of the Israeli Ministry of Science, Technology and Space. A military scientist who is also a retired general of the Israel Defense Forces and former member of parliament, Ben-Israel presented his views on the development of artificial intelligence and the impact it has on the cyber threats that can lead to ransomware attacks or breaches such as the one Equifax experienced this year.

Using the Stuxnet virus, which took an Iranian uranium facility offline, Ben-Israel noted that real physical effects — in this case the collapse of the centrifuge machines — can result from “virtual” information such as the computer virus. This led him to propose four false dogmas relating to cyber warfare.

First, cyber warfare is not only about information, as evidenced by the Stuxnet virus.

Second, cyber warfare is not only about the internet — the Iranian facility wasn’t even connected to the internet.

Third, cyber warfare is not only about computers, as there was not a computer to be seen in the Iranian nuclear facility. Stuxnet attacked the centrifuge machine controllers instead of computers.

Finally, cybersecurity is not only about technology, as without taking into account the psychology of individuals and social behavior, legal problems or business considerations, one would not be able to choose the right technology to develop in the first place.

Ben-Israel says cyber security is simply the dark side of computing, and our industry is tasked with minimizing that dark side by taking preventative steps.

Enter artificial intelligence based on machine learning algorithms, now known as deep learning.

AI plays two distinct roles in the financial advisor community, first as intelligence to drive trading — Ben Israel estimates 95% of all trades in the exchanges are now computer-driven — and AI also is the underpinning of modern robo software that is increasing in popularity.

However, AI may play a bigger role in the future, as the engine in cybersecurity tools that help prevent socially engineered phishing attacks and viruses from impacting the machines and networks that increasingly are the lifeblood of businesses.

He left the audience with some points to ponder. “When we make a biological virus, we have to check that it won’t cause a pandemic,” said Ben-Israel. “But, we don’t have to do that for computer viruses.”

His final, echoing thought: “You have to run very fast to be one step ahead with cybersecurity … if you want to survive.”

 

 

ISIS hackers respond to US cyberattacks with threat

 

Uniformed and civilian cyber and military intelligence specialists monitor Army networks in the Cyber Mission Unit’s Cyber Operations Center at Fort Gordon, Ga. U.S. Army photo by Michael L. Lewis 0 Monitor Networks Uniformed and civilian cyber and military intelligence specialists monitor Army networks in the Cyber Mission Unit’s Cyber Operations Center at Fort Gordon, Ga. U.S. Army photo by Michael L. Lewis

Applied Technology Institute (ATI Courses) offers a variety of courses on Cyber Security, Communications & Networking, We think the recent developments below would be of interest to our readers.

A group of pro-ISIS hackers known as the United Cyber Caliphate responded to cyber attacks mounted by the U.S. against the terror group with a threat.

In a post uncovered on the messaging app Telegram, the hackers declared the U.S. is their target and said President Barack Obama “should afford all the consequences.” “#Expect the Islamic state #SOON,” it said in a post published late Tuesday.

The group also slammed the “technical US-led war” against the Islamic State as “fake” and said it doesn’t harm ISIS.

The message is not an official statement by the terror group, but marks the time ISIS-affiliated hackers have responded to U.S. cyber attacks. It follows an April 24 New York Times report that Washington is taking the battle against ISIS online, directing its Cyber Command to wage computer attacks that aim to undermine ISIS’ abilities to draw new supporters, distribute orders and execute daily functions like pay fighters. “We are dropping cyberbombs,” Deputy Secretary of Defense Robert O. Work told the paper. “We have never done that before.”

It is unclear if the United Cyber Caliphate has been effected by the attacks. They may have offered a response since they’re the main group associated with Islamic State’s hacking activities. Earlier this week, Vocativ discovered that the group distributed a “kill” list that appeared to include dozens of U.S. government personnel — people linked to the State Department, the Department of Homeland Security and the departments of defense, energy, commerce and health and services.

Read the original report on US Cyber Attacks here.

 


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Anonymous #OpISIS: Can Cyber Warfare Win the War on Terror?

Applied Technology Institute (ATI Courses) offers a variety of courses on Cyber Security, Communications & Networking.  This is our take on the recent activities of the most famed Hacktivist group to date called  Anonymous.

The horrors of the Paris attacks have prompted a new wave of hate and determination among the cyberwarfare group of unknown size. Anonymous will not forgive. Anonymous will not forget. Expect them.

With the news of this declaration of war, many questions are rising. Will Anonymous succeed? Are cyberattacks what is needed in the face of the ever-expanding terrorist organization? Will it do more harm than good?

Cyberattacks have taken many forms in the past, often focusing on taking control of online accounts, websites or databases and causing ridicule or putting a full stop to any of the targeted organization’s operations. The online hacker group has been famous for coming from all over the world to unite over one cause, be it the taking down of a government, as in their recent launch of Operation North Korea, or publishing and thereby shutting down harmful websites, such as child pornography websites in a ploy known as Operation DarkNet. Anonymous had a key role in kickstarting Arab Spring protests with their involvement in Operation Tunisia, which served to fight online censorship and awaken Tunisian activism in the face of their repressive government.

What are its plans to destroy Daesh?

Operation Ice ISIS, which vowed to execute “coordinated cyberattacks against extremist Jihadi websites and governments such as Turkey and Saudi Arabia who funded and supported ISIS”, had already been initiated in late September of last year.  Among criticism and fear of putting the cyberattackers in extreme danger, however, this operation resorted to using knowledge as a weapon. The goal became to spread the fact that ISIS does not represent a religion, and that the 1.6 billion Muslims in the world do not condone the abominable actions being carried out by the extremist group.

The operation was revived after the Charlie Hebdo attacks in January of this year. Consecutive videos were published as part of #OpIsis (in FebruaryMarch, and April). The operation seemed somewhat successful, as Anonymous publicized the taking down of ISIS websites and published ISIS database information. Will this suffice to take down Daesh, one of the most feared terrorist organizations of the 21st century?

According to them, the answer lies in their identity. They represent everyone and everything:

“We Are: Muslims, Christians, Jews… We Are hackers, crackers, hacktivists, phishers, agents, spies, or just the guy from next door. We Are students, administrators, workers, clerks, unemployed, rich, poor. We are young, or old, gay or straight. We wear smart clothes or rugs, we are hedonists, ascetics, joy riders or activists. We come from all races, countries, religions, and ethnicity.” (taken from the Anonymous Official Youtube channel)

This is particularly important in the face of ISIS, an extremist organization claiming to represent one of the largest religions of the world and aiming to destroy all those who do not believe in the same God they do. Unlike national governments, which hide behind specific ideologies, languages, and other exclusionary factors, Anonymous has the power to attract anyone from anywhere in the world, regardless of their language or religion.

ISIS has also often been known to make wide use of the Internet and social media in its recruiting campaigns, as well as in its mission to spread fear across the globe. This widespread use of social media such as Facebook, Twitter, and Youtube accounts, has been crucial in the war that Anonymous has waged, as seen with results of #OpIsis earlier in the year. Already, Operation Paris has resulted in the shutting down of multiple ISIS Twitter accounts, most likely used to recruit youth into the extremist group.

Will Anonymous be able to maintain a strong identity and ideology as well as support in its endeavor to destroy ISIS?

Please comment below.

For more cyber warfare news please visit The Cyber Wire.


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Applied Technology Introduces New Cyber Warfare Short Course

(Riva, MD; January 2014) The Applied Technology Institute (ATI) announces a new two-day professional development short course, Theory and Fundamentals of Cyber Warfare, offered to the public on March 18-20, 2014 in Columbia, Maryland. The course is offered in response to the growing need for businesses and military facilities to quickly gain an understanding of cyber threats and institute cyber security defenses. It is targeted especially to DoD analysts, specialists and engineers in security related facilities in the Washington, DC, Virginia and Maryland metro area, which has the largest concentration of DoD national security related facilities in the United States. Those facilities, along with the research and development contractors they work with, are building their resources to tackle the growing need for cyber security experts.

Cyber Warfare is all over news headlines. World leaders, including the United States, Russia, South Korea and Great Britain, are scrambling to organize against the rapidly increasing varieties of threats such as spyware and malware, spoofing, phishing and botnets that are having devastating effects around the world. Digital intelligence experts have labeled these escalating cyber threats as a “Global Cyber Cold War”.

The instructor for ATI’s new Theory and Fundamentals of Cyber Warfare course is Albert Kinney, who brings more than 20 years of experience in research and operational cyberspace mission areas including the initial development and first operational employment of the Naval Cyber Attack Team. Kinney says, “ I designed the course to focus on providing a top-down view of both the challenges and opportunities encountered in this new warfare domain. Attendees will gain insight to emerging requirements and trends affecting the implementation of cyber warfare systems, policy, and operations that will inform your strategy and focus your efforts in cyberspace.”

Maryland Governor, Martin O’Malley, was recently interviewed on 103.5 FM WTOP radio identifying Maryland as the next, “silicon valley” of cyber security. “Cyberspace has emerged as a mainstream warfare domain on par with air, land, sea, and space domains. This advancement to a bona fide battle space arises from the de facto behaviors of entities ranging from international superpowers to improvised non-state organizations. As a result, government and military organizations are developing new doctrines, establishing domain-focused operational hierarchies, and acquiring new systems capabilities to maintain cyberspace as a viable resource serving the national interest,” Kinney explains.

The topic of cyber security first gained momentum when President Obama announced in May that his administration will pursue a plan to secure America’s digital infrastructure and that, “Protecting this infrastructure will be a national security priority.” The President’s plan will involve nearly all sectors of local and national government and military.

Prospective attendees can view the full Theory and Fundamentals of Cyber Warfare course description by clicking on:
http://www.aticourses.com/theory_fundamentals_cyber_warfare.html
The Applied Technology Institute (ATI) specializes in professional development seminars in the technical areas of space, communications, defense, sonar, radar, and signal processing. For over twenty-five years, ATI has presented leading-edge technical training to defense and NASA facilities, as well as DoD and aerospace contractors. ATI courses provide a clear understanding of the fundamental principles and a working knowledge of current technology and applications. ATI has the unique capability to schedule and deliver courses in a matter of weeks. They offer customized on-site training at your facility anywhere in the United States, as well as internationally and over 200 annual public courses in dozens of locations. World-class design experts lead courses. To register or for an on-site quote, call (888) 501-2100, or visit them on the web at www.ATIcourses.com.


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Cybersecurity Round-Up: Commerce’s Big Cyber Spend and DEF CON

Cyber attacks and growing cyber paranoia are on the rise around the world.  Applied Technology Institute, LLC offers a new Cyber Warfare- Global Trends course on June 10-12, 2014 in Columbia, MD.  If you would you to protect your company against this modern day threat please register here. Also, you might find the story below interesting.

The U.S. Economic Development Administration shot itself in the foot by spending $3 million of taxpayers’ money to remedy a cyber attack — that never happened.

That’s the upshot of a recent study by the EDA’s parent agency, the U.S. Department of Commerce, reporter Lisa Rein writes in The Washington Post.

“Federal officials were so worried the infection would spread to economically sensitive information that 200 employees had to spend months without e=mail or access to Internet servers and databases,” according to the story. “BlackBerrys were abandoned, and there was no Internet communications with regional offices.

“Officials spent almost $3 million to destroy computers, hire consultants and secure temporary networks before building a new operating network from scratch.”

It all started when a Dept. of Homeland Security team flagged a possible virus in December 2011.

“Inexperienced, unqualified IT employees overreacted to information that turned out to be wrong, investigators found in their June 26 report,” Rein wrote. “They spoke past one another and did not validate how many computers had been targeted.

“They failed to heed early conclusions that this was not a large-scale attack by a foreign entity.”

The Senate Commerce Committee appears to be spending its time and money on another cyber measure. On Thursday, the committee released a draft bill to enhance the nation’s cybersecurity through standards, best practices, research and development, and public awareness and preparedness. The legislation is expected to be marked up in the next few weeks.


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Cyber Warfare: Chinese Accused Again

ATI’s offers Cyber Warfare- Global Trends course. It will be offered on June 18-20, 2013 in Columbia, MD.
We thought the news below could be of interest to our visitors.

A security company says it has traced cyber-espionage activities to a unit of China’s People’s Liberation Army.

In a report released on Tuesday, Mandiant Corp. said it has reasons to believe that a group it called Advanced Persistent Threat 1 (APT1) is likely backed by the Chinese government.

Mandiant, an advanced threat detection and response firm based in Washington D.C. said the cyber-espionage activity was traced to a certain PLA Unit 61398. The company said the unit is located in a huge building in Datong Road in Gaoqiaozhen, in the Pudong New Area in Shanghai.

A statement released on Tuesday, Mandiant said Unit 61398’s activities are considered a state secret. However, Mandiant said it has been tracking APT1 since 2006 and has found it to have compromised 141 companies in 20 major industries. The security firm said 80 per cent of the target companies were headquartered in countries where English is the native language and are in industries that China has identified as strategic.
A report from Computerworld.com, however said that China’s Foreign Ministry on Tuesday said that the government is opposed to hacking.

“Cyber-attacks are transnational and anonymous,” said ministry spokesman Hong Lei in a press conference. “It is very hard to trace the origin of attacks. I don’t know has this evidence in the relevant report is tenable.”

Mandiant said APT1 uses tools called GETMAIL and MAPIGET which are meant for stealing emails. The group can revisit a victim’s network over a period of months or years and pilfer technology blue prints, business plans, proprietary processes, emails, contact list and contract information, said Mandiant.

The security firm said it is releasing more than 3,000 APT1 indicators to expose APT1’s infrastructure and allow organizations to bolster their defenses against the cyber group.

Read more.


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Cyber Weapons: Are They The Deadliest Means Of Modern Warfare?

Chinese offensive capabilities in cyberspace are more effective than ever and are the subject of interest by the international community which fears the rise of China as a technological colossus.

The Pentagon is convinced that China is investing heavily in an effort to improve its cyber stature and ability to conduct offensive operations.

After violent demonstrations in China against Japan, a series of cyber attacks hit the websites of the Japan’s Defense Ministry, Internal Affairs and Communications Ministry, and the Supreme Court including Japan’s Statistics Bureau and Banking networks.

Iranian government recently conducted a major cyber attack on a major U.S. financial institution. The attack, although was unsuccessful – exhibited how Tehran has emerged as a strategic threat to U.S. cyber systems that control critical infrastructure such as military systems, financial networks, communications, the electrical power grid, transportation networks, and other vital functions.

South Korea since 2009 has cyber warfare command to work on Internet hacking prevention, cyber security, and restoration of damaged networks and carries out military operations in cyberspace in cases of emergency.

North Korea is reported to have a strong cyber warfare unit staffing more than 3000 people under the command chief of country’s intelligence agency. It has nation’s most gifted young people to work as professional hackers and get involved in other cyber warfare activities.

The question arises should not there be an international instrument to govern cyber warfare activities among countries of the world?


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Fundamentals of COTS-Based Systems Engineering Course

C. O. T. S. = Commercial Off-the-Shelf
Video Clip: Click to Watch
Leveraging Commercial Off-the-Shelf Technology for System Success 

This three day course provides a systemic overview of how to use Systems Engineering to plan, manage, and execute projects that have significant Commercial-off-the-Shelf (COTS) content. Modern development programs are increasingly characterized by COTS solutions (both hardware and software) in both the military and commercial domains.

The course focuses on the fundamentals of planning, execution, and follow-through that allow for the delivery of excellent and effective COTS-based systems to ensure the needs of all external and internal stakeholders are met. Participants will learn the necessary adjustments to the fundamental principles of Systems Engineering when dealing with COTS technologies. Numerous examples of COTS systems are presented. Practical information and tools are provided that will help the participants deal with issues that inevitably occur in the real word. Extensive in-class exercises are used to stimulate application of the course material.

Who Should Attend?

• Prime and subcontractor engineers who procure COTS components.

• Suppliers who produce and supply COTS components (hardware and software).

• Technical team leaders whose responsibilities include COTS technologies.

• Program and engineering managers that oversee COTS development efforts.

• Government regulators, administrators, and sponsors of COTS procurement efforts.

• Military professionals who work with COTS-based systems.

For more information:

FUNDAMENTALS OF COTS-BASED SYSTEMS ENGINEERING

Why not take a short course? Our short courses are less than a week long and are designed to help you keep your professional knowledge up-to-date. This course provides provide a strong foundation for understanding the issues that must be confronted in the procurement and use of COTS systems.

Course Outline and Notes

This short course is designed for individuals who plan, manage, and execute projects that have significant COTS content.

What You Will Learn:

• The key characteristics of COTS components.

• How to effectively plan and manage a COTS development effort.

• How using COTS affects your requirements and design.

• How to effectively integrate COTS into your systems.

• Effective verification and validation of COTS-based systems.

• How to manage your COTS suppliers.

• The latest lessons learned from over two decades of COTS developments.

After attending the course each student will receive a complete set of lecture notes and an annotated bibliography at the beginning of the class for future reference and can add notes and more detail based on the in-class interaction, as well as a certificate of completion. Please visit our website for more valuable information.

About ATI and the Instructors

Our mission here at the Applied Technology Institute (ATI) is to provide expert training and the highest quality professional development in space, communications, defense, sonar, radar, and signal processing. We are not a one-size-fits-all educational facility. Our short classes include both introductory and advanced courses.

Since 1984, ATI has provided leading-edge public courses and onsite technical training to DoD and NASA personnel, as well as contractors. Whether you are a busy engineer, a technical expert or a project manager, you can enhance your understanding of complex systems in a short time.

You will become aware of the basic vocabulary essential to interact meaningfully with your colleagues. If you or your team is in need of more technical training, then boost your career with the knowledge needed to provide better, faster, and cheaper solutions for sophisticated DoD and NASA systems.

ATI’s instructors are world-class experts who are the best in the business. They are carefully selected for their ability to clearly explain advanced technology.

David D. Walden, ESEP, is an internationally recognized expert in the field of Systems Engineering. He has over 28 years of experience in leadership of systems development as well as in organizational process improvement and quality having worked at McDonnell Douglas and General Dynamics before starting his own consultancy in 2006.

He has a BS degree in Electrical Engineering (Valparaiso University) and MS degrees in Electrical Engineering and Computer Science (Washington University in St. Louis) and Management of Technology (University of Minnesota). Mr. Walden is a member of the International Council on Systems Engineering (INCOSE) and is an INCOSE Expert Systems Engineering Professional (ESEP). He is also a member of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) and Tau Beta Pi. He is the author or coauthor of over 50 technical reports and professional papers/presentations addressing all aspects of Systems Engineering.

Dates and Locations

The date and location of this course is below:

May 8-10, 2012 in Columbia, MD

President Obama Wants Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) in an Airspace Near You!

President Obama sends a Valentine’s Day Present to UAS
Video Clip: Click to Watch
What You Really Need to Know About Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS)

Are you an engineer, aviation expert or project manager who wishes to enhance their understanding of the new and exciting field of Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS)?

President Obama recently signed legislation that gives the FAA a deadline for authorizing the flying of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs) in airspace now reserved for use by manned planes. The legislation requires the FAA to produce a comprehensive plan within nine months for integrating the unmanned planes into manned airspace.

President Obama Signs FAA Bill into Law

Large UAVs like the Predator and Global Hawk are always in the news and they can access Class A airspace (above 18,000 ft). Their long endurance and virtually unlimited range makes them ideal platforms for surveillance operations. They are routinely controlled halfway around the world using satellite links for beyond line-of-sight (BLOS) operations.

Operational altitudes range for the smaller UAVs like the Scan Eagle are typically from 2,000-5,000 feet but flights up to 8,000 feet (6,000 at night) are common. Line-of-sight (LOS) range is about 50-100 miles when the ground is flat, or even less when hilly or mountainous.

UAS technology has rapidly evolved in the military context to perform Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance (ISR) missions and provide the fullest possible understanding of the adversary to the commanding officer. UAV have the range and endurance to provide a bird’s-eye view of the battlefield and are flexible enough for dynamic mission re-tasking. This allows timely receipt of information about the adversary, when and where it is needed, without having to risk a manned aircraft. UAVs are often preferred for missions that are too “dull, dirty, or dangerous” for manned aircraft.

Many of the military aircraft will be returning to the US for testing and training purposes and as the recent FAA legislation proves, there is a great deal of interest for civil use of UAS. Civilian UAVs have already demonstrated potential in a wide variety of missions. Local law enforcement, firefighting, agriculture, pipeline surveillance and atmospheric research are all areas which have benefited from UAVs.

One way or another, UAVs are coming to an airspace near you.

Will you be ready for it?

Since 1984, the Applied Technology Institute (ATI) has provided leading-edge public courses and onsite technical training to DoD and NASA personnel, as well as contractors.

Whether you are a busy engineer, a technical expert or a project manager, you can enhance your understanding of these complex systems in a short time. You will become aware of the basic vocabulary essential to interact meaningfully with your colleagues.

If you or your team is in need of more technical training, then why not boost your career and knowledge with a short course? All of ATI’s short courses are less than a week long and are designed to help you keep your professional knowledge up-to-date. Our classes include both introductory and advanced courses.

Our two UAS courses provide a practical overview which provides a strong foundation for understanding the issues that must be confronted in the use, regulation and development of UAS.

UNMANNED AIRCRAFT OVERVIEW

This one day course is designed for engineers, aviation experts and project managers who wish to enhance their understanding of UAS. The course provides the “big picture” for those who work outside of the discipline. Each topic addresses real systems (Predator, Shadow, Warrior and others) and real-world problems and issues concerning the use and expansion of their applications. There is also an emphasis on RF communications and spectrum management aspects (national and international) of UAS operations.

UNMANNED AIRCRAFT SYSTEM FUNDAMENTALS

This three day, classroom and practical instructional program provides individuals or teams entering the unmanned aircraft system (UAS) market with the need to ‘hit the ground running’. Delegates will gain a working knowledge of UAS system classification, payloads, sensors, communications and data links. You will learn the UAS weapon design process and UAS system design components. The principles of mission planning systems and human factors design considerations are described. The critical issue of integrating UAS in the NAS is addressed in detail along with major considerations. Multiple roadmaps from all services are used to explain UAS future missions.

Course Outline, Samplers, and Notes

Our UAS courses are designed for individuals involved in planning, designing, building, managing, launching, and operating these systems. Determine for yourself the value of our courses before you sign up. See our slide samples below:

Unmanned Aircraft Overview Slide Sampler

Unmanned Aircraft System Fundamentals Slide Sampler

After attending either (or both) of these courses you will receive a full set of detailed notes at the beginning of the class for future reference and can add notes and more detail based on the in-class interaction, as well as a certificate of completion. Please visit our website for more valuable information.

About ATI and the Instructors

Our mission here at ATI is to provide expert training and the highest quality professional development in space, communications, defense, sonar, radar, and signal processing. We are not a one-size-fits-all educational facility.

ATI’s instructors are world-class experts who are the best in the business. They are carefully selected for their ability to clearly explain advanced technology.

Mr. Mark N. Lewellen has over twenty-five years of experience with a wide variety of space, satellite and aviation related projects, including the Predator/Shadow/Warrior/Global Hawk UAVs, Orbcomm, Iridium, Sky Station, and aeronautical mobile telemetry systems. More recently he has been working in the exciting field of UAS. He was the Vice Chairman of a US UAS Sub-group which led the preparations to find new radio spectrum for UAS operations at the recently completed World Radiocommunication Conference 2012 under Agenda Item 1.3. He is also a technical advisor to the US State Department and a member of the National Committee which reviews and comments on all US submissions to international telecommunication groups, including the International Telecommunication Union (ITU).

Dr. Jerry LeMieux, PhD is a pilot and engineer with over 40 years and 10,000 hours of aviation experience. He has over 30 years of experience in operations, program management, systems engineering, R&D and test and evaluation for AEW, fighter and tactical data link acquisition programs. He led 1,300 personnel and managed 100 network and data link acquisition programs with a five year portfolio valued at more than $22 billion. He served at the numbered Air Force Level, responsible for the development, acquisition and sustainment of over 300 information superiority, combat ops and combat support programs that assure integrated battlespace dominance for the Air Force, DoD, US agencies and Allied forces. In civilian life he has consulted on numerous airspace issues for the US Federal Aviation Administration, Air Force, Army, Navy, NASA and DARPA. He holds a PhD in electrical engineering and is a graduate of Air War College and Defense Acquisition University.

Dates and Locations

The dates and locations of these two UAS courses are below:*

March 19th,             2012      Columbia, MD

March 20th-22nd,  2012      Columbia, MD

*Attendance for these classes is restricted to citizens of US, NATO and other Mutual Defense Countries (including Australia, NZ, Japan, Korea, Singapore)


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ATI’s Top 5 Engineering Course Samplers of 2011

What Are the Tools of Your Trade?
Video Clip: Click to Watch
ATI specializes in short course technical training

Our mission here at the Applied Technology Institute (ATI) is to provide expert training and the highest quality professional development in space, communications, defense, sonar, radar, and signal processing. We are not a one-size-fits-all educational facility. Our short classes include both introductory and advanced courses.

ATI’s Top Five Engineering Courses for 2011

The five engineering courses for 2011 are highlighted below:

#1 Practical Statistical Signal Processing – using MATLAB

This 4-day course covers signal processing systems for radar, sonar, communications, speech, imaging and other applications based on state-of-the-art computer algorithms. These algorithms include important tasks such as data simulation, parameter estimation, filtering, interpolation, detection, spectral analysis, beamforming, classification, and tracking. Until now these algorithms could only be learned by reading the latest technical journals. This course will take the mystery out of these designs by introducing the algorithms with a minimum of mathematics and illustrating the key ideas via numerous examples using MATLAB.

Designed for engineers, scientists, and other professionals who wish to study the practice of statistical signal processing without the headaches, this course will make extensive use of hands-on MATLAB implementations and demonstrations. Attendees will receive a suite of software source code and are encouraged to bring their own laptops to follow along with the demonstrations.

Click here for the tutorial

#2 Advanced Topics in Digital Signal Processing

This four-day course is designed for communication systems engineers, programmers, implementers and managers who need to understand current practice and next generation DSP techniques for upcoming communication systems. DSP is more than mapping legacy analog designs to a DSP implementation. To avoid compromise solution appropriate for an earlier time period, we return to first principles to learn how to apply new technology capabilities to the design of next generation communication systems.

Click here for the tutorial

#3 Engineering Systems Modeling WithExcel/VBA

This two-day course is for engineers, scientists, and others interested in developing custom engineering system models. Principles and practices are established for creating integrated models using Excel and its built-in programming environment, Visual Basic for Applications (VBA). Real-world techniques and tips not found in any other course, book, or other resource are revealed. Step-bystep implementation, instructor-led interactive examples, and integrated participant exercises solidify the concepts introduced. Application examples are demonstrated from the instructor’s experience in unmanned underwater vehicles, LEO spacecraft, cryogenic propulsion systems, aerospace & military power systems, avionics thermal management, and other projects.

Click here for the tutorial

#4 Wavelets: A Conceptual, Practical Approach

Fast Fourier Transforms (FFT) are in wide use and work very well if your signal stays at a constant frequency (“stationary”). But if the signal could vary, have pulses, “blips” or any other kind of interesting behavior then you need Wavelets. Wavelets are remarkable tools that can stretch and move like an amoeba to find the hidden “events” and then simultaneously give you their location, frequency, and shape. Wavelet Transforms allow this and many other capabilities not possible with conventional methods like the FFT.

This course is vastly different from traditional math-oriented Wavelet courses or books in that we use examples, figures, and computer demonstrations to show how to understand and work with Wavelets. This is a comprehensive, in-depth, up-to-date treatment of the subject, but from an intuitive, conceptual point of view. We do look at a few key equations from the traditional literature but only AFTER the concepts are demonstrated and understood. If desired, further study from scholarly texts and papers is then made much easier and more palatable when you already understand the fundamental equations and how they relate to the real world.

Click here for the tutorial

#5 Computational Electromagnetics

This 3-day course teaches the basics of CEM with application examples. Fundamental concepts in the solution of EM radiation and scattering problems are presented. Emphasis is on applying computational methods to practical applications. You will develop a working knowledge of popular methods such as the FEM, MOM, FDTD, FIT, and TLM including asymptotic and hybrid methods. Students will then be able to identify the most relevant CEM method for various applications, avoid common user pitfalls, understand model validation and correctly interpret results. Students are encouraged to bring their laptop to work examples using the provided FEKO Lite code. You will learn the importance of model development and meshing, post- processing for scientific visualization and presentation of results.

Click here for the tutorial

Course Outline, Samplers, and Notes

Determine for yourself the value of these or our other courses before you sign up. See our samples (See Slide Samples) on some of our courses.

Or check out the new ATI channel on YouTube.

After attending the course you will receive a full set of detailed notes from the class for future reference, as well as a certificate of completion. To see the complete course listing from ATI, click on the links at the bottom of the page.

Please visit our website for more valuable information.

About ATI and the Instructors

Since 1984, ATI has provided leading-edge public courses and onsite technical training to DoD and NASA personnel, as well as contractors. ATI short courses are designed to help you keep your professional knowledge up-to-date.

Our courses provide you a practical overview of space and defense technologies which provide a strong foundation for understanding the issues that must be confronted in the use, regulation and development such complex systems.

Our short courses are designed for individuals involved in planning, designing, building, launching, and operating space and defense systems. Whether you are a busy engineer, a technical expert or a project manager, you can enhance your understanding of complex systems in a short time. You will also become aware of the basic vocabulary essential to interact meaningfully with your colleagues.

ATI’s instructors are world-class experts who are the best in the business. They are carefully selected for their ability to clearly explain advanced technology.


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