Category Archives: unmanned aircraft systems (UAS)

ATI’s Instructor’s Featured in the Top Five Autonomous Unmanned Aircraft Systems Study

ATI’s instructor Paul Gelhausen’s  company was featured in a recent survey of up-and-coming companies in Unmanned Aircraft Systems.  Paul Gelhausen teaches Unmanned Air Vehicle Design. He is Founder, Managing Member and Chief Technical Officer of an Avid, an aerospace and software company. His company was featured in the recent report  “Emerging Market New Independent Study: Autonomous Unmanned Aircraft Systems And Whom To Watch”.

AVID, LLC.  AVID, an aerospace engineering and software development firm provides multidisciplinary aircraft design and analyses. AVID’s focus is the development of novel aerodynamic concepts and aircraft designs, as well as the creation of standards-based, platform-independent, aircraft design and optimization software. www.avidaerospace.com

These UAS courses are scheduled. The first two are taught by Paul Gelhausen. The second two are taught by Dr. (Col. Ret.) Jerry LeMieux, who is President Of Unmanned Vehicle University. He has over 40 years and 10,000 hours of aviation experience.

Unmanned Air Vehicle Design Sep 24-26, 2013 Columbia, MD
Unmanned Air Vehicle Design Jan 28-30, 2014 Columbia, MD
Unmanned Aircraft System Fundamentals Jul 23-25, 2013 Columbia, MD
Unmanned Aircraft System Fundamentals Feb 25-27, 2014 Columbia, MD

http://www.prlog.org/12158510-emerging-market-new-independent-study-autonomous-unmanned-aircraft-systems-and-whom-to-watch.html

 

 

Somalia Video Shows The Remaining Pieces Of The Unmanned US Surveillance Drone

ATIcourses provides short courses on Unmanned Vehicles Technology and post relevant news articles.

This link provides a highly opinionated discussion of the use of unmanned drones in Somalia. These photos show the remaining pieces of the unmanned US surveillance drone and also show fighters celebrating the US loss of one of its spy drones. The video appears to be generated by a press TV in Somalia.

“Analysts say these drone attacks have proved counterproductive in many Muslim countries and have also undermined the country’s sovereignty by violating its airspace. “

http://www.presstv.ir/detail/2013/06/06/307437/two-unmanned-us-drones-crash-in-somalia/?goback=%2Egde_941207_member_247590882

What is your opinion? Are unmanned drones in Somalia effective? What portion of the overall missions are surveillance versus those that attack specific targets?

 

Future UAV courses include

Unmanned Air Vehicle Design Sep 24-26, 2013 Columbia, MD
Unmanned Air Vehicle Design Jan 28-30, 2014 Columbia, MD
Unmanned Aircraft System Fundamentals Jul 23-25, 2013 Columbia, MD
Unmanned Aircraft System Fundamentals Feb 25-27, 2014 Columbia, MD

 

 

Are you OK with growing use of unmanned drones in U.S.?

It’s happening in the United States more and more. A technology once confined to foreign battlefields is becoming increasingly common in domestic airspace.

As the Wall Street Journal reports, “With little public attention, dozens of universities and law-enforcement agencies have been given approval by federal aviation regulators to use unmanned aircraft known as drones, according to documents obtained via Freedom of Information Act requests by an advocacy group.

The more than 50 institutions that received approvals to operate remotely piloted aircraft are more varied than many outsiders and privacy experts previously knew. They include not only agencies such as the Department of Homeland Security but also smaller ones such as the police departments in North Little Rock, Ark., and Ogden, Utah, as well the University of North Dakota and Nicholls State University in Louisiana.

What do you think about this trend?

– Does it worry you … or reassure you?

– Should drones be limited or welcomed like other new technology?

– Does your right to privacy extend to the airspace above your home or business?

– Would you accept any drone as long as it is unarmed?

If you have a comment on this  topic, post it below now!


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Warfare of the future: does it belong to the drones?

There is no doubt that the use of unmanned aircrafts or drones has seen a tremendous growth over the last few years. Since 2005 there has been a 1,200% increase in combat air patrols by UAVs. Al-Qaeda leader Anwar al-Awlaki was killed by a drone only last month. But does this mean that the future belongs to UAS? What are the pros and cons of using unmanned aircraft vehicles vs manned?

What are the pros and cons of UAVs?


Pros include:

    1) significantly lower cost compared to manned vehicles (although they can get pretty expensive depending on their sophistication); this should allow the military to buy UAVs in much larger quantities than manned aircraft
    2) expendability, you can afford to send them into heavily defended areas and risk losing some without endangering a pilot
    3) more maneuverable than manned planes without the limitations of a human pilot
    4) can be built stealthier than a manned plane since one of the least stealthy parts of the aircraft (the cockpit) is unnecessary
    5) should be lighter, smaller, and easier to transport

Cons include:

    1) limitations of their programming, may not be able to compensate for the changing battlefield environment (such as being able to attack a new more desirable target that appeared after the aircraft was launched or changing course to avoid enemy defenses)
    2) because they are typically smaller than a manned plane, they cannot carry as large a payload (however, they do generally have a greater ratio of payload to total weight)
    3) along the same lines, they may not be able to carry as much fuel and therefore may have a shorter range
    4) typically tailored to specific kinds of missions and not as versatile as a modern multi-role fighter
    5) if contact is lost with a ground station, the vehicle may be lost

Overall, but the pilot in the cockpit is already an endangered species.

What is your opinion? Please comment below.

Read more here.


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Keylogger Virus Vs US Drones? Place your bets?

Yes, it has come to this! Apparently, a “keylogger” virus (that the nasty kind that records EVERY keystroke) has hit Creech Air Force Base in Nevada. Chreech is the main base of operations for US Drones. The virus kept coming back resisting every attempt to remove it from the drives. Eventually, the drives had to be wiped clean and rebuilt from scratch. That is a lot of man hours!

The virus, first detected nearly two weeks ago by the military’s Host-Based Security System, has not prevented pilots at Creech Air Force Base in Nevada from flying their missions overseas. Nor have there been any confirmed incidents of classified information being lost or sent to an outside source. But the virus has resisted multiple efforts to remove it from Creech’s computers, network security specialists say. And the infection underscores the ongoing security risks in what has become the U.S. military’s most important weapons system.
Drones have become America’s tool of choice in both its conventional and shadow wars, allowing U.S. forces to attack targets and spy on its foes without risking American lives. Since President Obama assumed office, a fleet of approximately 30 CIA-directed drones have hit targets in Pakistan more than 230 times; all told, these drones have killed more than 2,000 suspected militants and civilians, according to the Washington Post. More than 150 additional Predator and Reaper drones, under U.S. Air Force control, watch over the fighting in Afghanistan and Iraq. American military drones struck 92 times in Libya between mid-April and late August. And late last month, an American drone killed top terrorist Anwar al-Awlaki — part of an escalating unmanned air assault in the Horn of Africa and southern Arabian peninsula.

But despite their widespread use, the drone systems are known to have security flaws. And this recent virus definitely proves it!

What do you think?

You can read more about the virus here.

 


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Last Chance to Sign Up for Course on Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS)

Video Clip: Click to Watch
ATI Offers Short Technical Course on Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS)

Worldwide government, commercial and military use of Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) is anticipated to increase significantly in the future.

If you need to know more about UAS maybe you should attend the Applied Technology Institute (ATI) Unmanned Aircraft Systems and Applications course?

This one-day course is designed for engineers, aviation experts and project managers who wish to enhance their understanding of UAS. The course provides the “big picture” for those who work outside of the discipline. Each topic addresses real systems (Predator, Shadow, Global Hawk and others) and real-world problems and issues concerning the use and expansion of their applications.

Attending training courses can also put you in touch with peers in your industry affording you the opportunity to network. Networking can help you discover new industry trends, as well as new ideas and insights from others.

Our short courses are designed for individuals involved in planning, designing, building, launching, and operating space and defense systems. Whether you are a busy engineer, a technical expert or a project manager, you can enhance your understanding of complex systems in a short time. You will become aware of the basic vocabulary essential to interact meaningfully with your colleagues.

Course Outline, Samplers and Notes

But don’t take our word for it; determine for yourself the value of our UAS course before you sign up. Check out ourUAS Course Slide Samples or see a video clip about the course from the instructor at UAS on YouTube.

After attending the course you will receive a full set of detailed notes from the class for future reference, as well as a certificate of completion. Please visit our website for more valuable information.

About ATI and the Instructors

Our mission here at the Applied Technology Institute (ATI) is to provide expert training and the highest quality professional development in space, communications, defense, sonar, radar, and signal processing. We are not a one-size-fits-all educational facility. Our short classes include both introductory and advanced courses.

ATI’s instructors are world-class experts who are the best in the business. They are carefully selected for their ability to clearly explain advanced technology.

Mr. Mark N. Lewellen is the vice chair of an Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) group in the United States that is responsible for generating future UAS spectrum requirements. He is also chairman of a global UAS group that may revise the international Radio Regulations. He is an instructor for a course designed for engineers, aviation experts and project managers who wish to enhance their understanding of UAS.

He has twenty-five years of experience and has actively participated in over forty international meetings where he successfully advocated technical and regulatory issues. He is co-founder of RMT Spectrum Associates, Inc.

Mr. Lewellen teaches GPS Workshops in conjunction with several Universities. He is an active member of Toastmasters International and an excellent speaker who knows how to take command of an audience.

Dates, Times and Locations

The UAS short course is currently scheduled for:

• November 8th, 2011 in Columbia, MD

• February 28th, 2012 in Columbia, MD

Now is the time to think about bringing an ATI technical short course to your site. If there are eight or more people who are interested in a course, you save money if we bring the course to you. If you have fifteen or more students, you save over fifty percent compared to a public course.


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Are U.S. Drones Safe? RQ-7 Shadow Collides With A Cargo Plane.

Apparently near-misses with drones happen more often than they should. Yet another one took place yesterday while UAV RQ-Shadow was on a surveillance mission over Afghanistan. Luckily, the collision wasn’t serious and the pilots of the C-130 cargo plane didn’t report any injuries or damages. However, the question remains: “Should pilotless aircraft be allowed to operate in civilian airspace?”.
The problem with the drones is that their field of view is very limited. Think of it like blacking out the windows in your car, putting a video camera on the hood and relaying that to a monitor above the steering wheel. That’s not such a big deal if you’re the only thing in the air, but often the drone isn’t. There have been plenty of close calls and even collisions involving UAV. Add in the time delay in signal from the drone in Afghanistan and the operator in DC that makes it worse.

Read more about the collision here.

What do you think?  Should the drones be allowed to fly in the civilian airspace?


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Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) course now available

Global Hawk Ready for Nighttime Mission

Video Clip: Click to Watch

Mark Lewellen of RMT Spectrum Associates, named Instructor for Unmanned Aerial Systems (UAS) course

The Applied Technology Institute (ATI) is pleased to announce that Mark N. Lewellen of RMT Associates, Inc. has been selected to teach an Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) course. UAS are a dynamically growing area of interest to the military. They range from the small single man launched Raven system to the large armed Predator system.

This one-day course is designed for engineers, aviation experts and project managers who wish to enhance their understanding of UAS. The course provides the “big picture” for those who work outside of the discipline. Each topic addresses real systems (Predator, Shadow, Warrior and others) and real-world problems and issues concerning the use and expansion of their applications.

What You Will Learn:

• Categories of current UAS and their aeronautical capabilities

• Major manufactures of UAS

• The latest developments and major components of a UAS

• The types of sensor data can UAS provide

• Regulatory and spectrum issues associated with UAS

• National Airspace System including the different classes of airspace

• How UAS will gain access to the National Airspace System (NAS)

A more complete course description can be found here

Course Outline, Samplers, and Notes

Our short courses are designed for individuals involved in planning, designing, building, launching, and operating space and defense systems.

Determine for yourself the value of this UAS course before you sign up:

UAS Class Video Clip #1

UAS Class Video Clip #2

Or, see slide samples from this UAS Short course.

After attending the course you will receive a full set of detailed notes from the class for future reference, as well as a certificate of completion. Please visit our website for more valuable information.

About ATI and the Instructors

Our mission here at ATI is to provide expert training and the highest quality professional development in space, communications, defense, sonar, radar, and signal processing. We are not a one-size-fits-all educational facility. Our short classes include both introductory and advanced courses.

ATI’s instructors are world-class experts who are the best in the business. They are carefully selected for their ability to clearly explain advanced technology.

Mr. Mark N. Lewellen has over twenty five years of experience with a wide variety of space, satellite and aviation related projects, including the Predator/Shadow/Warrior/Global Hawk UAVs, Orbcomm, Iridium, Sky Station, and aeronautical mobile telemetry systems. More recently he has been working in the exciting field of UAS. He is currently the Vice Chairman of a UAS Sub-group under Working Party 5B which is leading the US preparations to find new radio spectrum for UAS operations for the next World Radiocommunication Conference in 2012 under Agenda Item 1.3. He is also a technical advisor to the US State Department and a member of the National Committee which reviews and comments on all US submissions to international telecommunication groups, including the International Telecommunication Union (ITU).

Times, Dates, and Locations

ATI’s UAS and Applications short course is currently scheduled for:

Nov 8, 2011 Columbia, MD

Feb 28, 2012 Columbia, MD


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Drone Fleets: The Countries That Possess Them And Potential For Robotic Wars

Despite some pretty disturbing news on UAV developments that are coming from China and a group of other countries U.S. remains the global leader in development, production and most importantly successful implementation of unmanned aircraft vehicles or drones.  However, there is a lot of speculation regarding the world’s expanding drone fleets and their potential for reducing the threshold for going to war.  Here is a list of known facts regarding this sensitive issue.

  1. USA is the main developer and manufacturer (however not exporter) of UAVs.  Near the top of the line, the Predator B, or MQ9-Reaper, manufactured by General Atomics Aeronautical Systems, costs about $10.5 million. By comparison, a single F-22 fighter jet costs about $150 million.

The new smaller models are currently developed.

  • Raytheon Missile Systems is in process of designing a 13lb Small Tactical Munition to be carried by smaller unmanned aircraft like Shadow, TigerShark, Hunter and Viking. The device is around 24 inches long and 4 inches around.
  • Northrop Grumman has come out with the Viper Strike, a gliding,GPS-aided laser-guided variant of the Northrop Grumman Brilliant Anti-Tank (BAT) munition which originally had a combinationacoustic and IR seeker. The Viper Strike is 36 inches long and only 5.5 inches in diameter.
  • Lockheed Martin has releasedthe Scorpion (21.5 inches in length, and 4.25 inches in diameter),which is adaptable to multiple launch platforms, including manned or unmanned systems.
  1. China is constantly increasing it’s development and production as well as export of drones.  At the most recent Zhuhai air show they revealed WJ-600 drone and than two dozen other Chinese models. Little is known about their actual abilities but the speed at which they have been developed highlights how U.S. military successes with drones have changed strategic thinking worldwide and spurred a global rush for unmanned aircraft.
  2. Israel, the second-largest drone manufacturer after the United States, has flown armed models, but few details are available.
  3. India announced this year that it is developing ones that will fire missiles and fly at 30,000 feet.
  4. Russia has shown models of drones with weapons, but there is little evidence that they are operational.
  5. Pakistan has said it plans to obtain armed drones from China, which has already sold the nation ones for surveillance.
  6. Iran last summer unveiled a drone that Iranian President Mahmoud Ahmadinejad called the “ambassador of death” but whose effectiveness is still unproven, according to military analysts.

China’s drone technology hasn’t reached the world’s first-class level, but the Chinese are catching up quickly. This is something we know for sure.

 


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Do You Wish to Enhance Your Understanding of Unmanned Aircraft?

MQ-9 Reaper on Approach for Landing

Where will you go to learn more about this exciting field?


Video Clip: Click to Watch

Worldwide commercial, government and military use of Unmanned Aircraft Systems (UAS) is expected to increase significantly in the future, placing unprecedented demands on scare radio resources. In fact, the Teal Group’s 2009 market study estimates that UAS spending will almost double over the next decade, from current worldwide UAS expenditures of $4.4 billion annually to $8.7 billion within a decade.

Since 1984, the Applied Technology Institute (ATI) has provided leading-edge public courses and onsite technical training to DoD and NASA personnel, as well as contractors. Whether you are a busy engineer, a technical expert or a project manager, you can enhance your understanding of complex systems in a short time. You will become aware of the basic vocabulary essential to interact meaningfully with your colleagues.

Course Outline, Samplers, and Notes

Determine for yourself the value of our UAS course before you sign up.

Click here for UAS Course Slide Sampler

After attending the course you will receive a full set of detailed notes from the class for future reference, as well as a certificate of completion. Please visit our website for more valuable information.

About ATI and the Instructors

Our mission here at ATI is to provide expert training and the highest quality professional development in space, communications, defense, sonar, radar, and signal processing. We are not a one-size-fits-all educational facility. Our short classes include both introductory and advanced courses.

ATI’s instructors are world-class experts who are the best in the business. They are carefully selected for their ability to clearly explain advanced technology.

Mr. Mark N. Lewellen, the ATI UAS instructor, has over twenty-five years with a wide variety of satellite, space, and aviation related projects. He is the Vice Chairman of a UAS group (in the United States) that is responsible for generating the technical basis for future UAS spectrum requirements. He was also chairman of an international group preparing for a World Radiocommunication Conference (WRC-2012) that may revise the international Radio Regulations governing the use of the radio-frequency spectrum.


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