Category Archives: Underwater Acoustics and Sonar

This blog posts news about acoustics and sonar, including links to industry news and articles, and announcements of continuing education for professionals who are working in the sonar, noise and acoustics profession. It includes information about sounds impact on marine mammals and US and International regulations and guidelines.

Synchronized Swimming for Submarines

The autonomous submarines at the Neutral Buoyancy Research Facility.

The autonomous submarines at the Neutral Buoyancy Research Facility.

Nature shows and Caribbean vacation commercials often depict a school of fish moving as a single entity to avoid obstacles and elude prey. Engineers hope to give unmanned mini-submarines, mini-helicopters and other autonomous vehicles the same coordinated movement.

Derek Paley, assistant professor of aerospace engineering at the University of Maryland’s A. James Clark School of Engineering, recently won a National Science Foundation Faculty Early Career Development (CAREER) Award for his proposal to study the coordinated movement of fish and apply it to unmanned submarines.

Unmanned vehicles under multi-vehicle control could navigate more accurately and collect data more reliably than individual vehicles. The Navy plans to use a fleet of unmanned submarines to measure oceanic salinity, temperature and density—the factors that affect the speed of sound through water. These measurements, in turn, will help better predict sonar performance.

Fish signal one another via visual cues and hydrodynamics (the movement of water). A line of tiny hair cells down each side of a fish helps them to sense the flow of the water around them.

Paley is giving a fleet of mini-subs onboard cameras to mimic the visual sensing of fish. Also aboard each 3-foot-long sub is a tiny computer that can process the information from the cameras to determine the relative position of the subs around it and use this information to steer.

Meanwhile, undergraduate student Alexander Leishman is developing sensors for Paley’s subs that will mimic the hair cells of the fish, to help the subs sense changes in the flow of the water.

In lab space provided by biology professor Arthur Popper on the College Park campus, Paley has set up a network of cameras to monitor a school of giant danios (hardy freshwater fish about three inches long) and how they react when they are startled. When one or more fish in a school is startled, they trigger what is known as a “wave of agitation”—one fish takes evasive action, its immediate neighbors follow suit, followed by their neighbors, and so on.

Paley takes the data captured by the cameras and uses it to create 3-d reconstructions of the fish movement. The models will help his research team better understand the information transmission among the fish and apply the same principles to the unmanned vehicles.

“We’re developing modern engineering tools to quantitatively study this phenomenon,” Paley says. “We’re taking methods you learn as an engineering student and applying them to study biology.”

The technology being built for the subs also can be applied to unmanned aerial vehicles.

“We’re looking at planetary-scale applications for these vehicles; for instance, monitoring conditions inside hurricanes to improve forecasting models,” Paley said.

“It’s important to fly lower—below 10,000 feet—to collect data where the air meets the water,” explains Paley. “Manned aircraft can’t fly that low inside a hurricane for safety reasons.”

Paley directs the Collective Dynamics and Control Lab, where he supervises the research projects of twelve undergraduate engineering students who help him build the autonomous submarines. Paley also has six graduate students working on related research including Sachit Butail, a doctoral candidate who is developing an automatic tracking system to monitor the fish and produce data at an unprecedented rate and volume. This fall, Paley will add a neuroscience grad student to his team who will help design and conduct experiments to glean more from the communication behaviors of the fish.

ATI Features World Class Instructors for Our Short Courses

Washington, DC
Tuesday, November 30, 2010
“Even I Could Learn a Thing or Two from ATI”
“Even I Could Learn a Thing or Two from ATI”
Video Clip: Click to Watch
Since 1984 ATI has provided leading-edge public courses

and onsite technical training

The short technical courses from the Applied Technology Institute (ATI) are designed to help you keep your professional knowledge up-to-date. Our courses provide a practical overview of space and defense technologies which provide a strong foundation for understanding the issues that must be confronted in the use, regulation and development such complex systems.

The classes are designed for individuals involved in planning, designing, building, launching, and operating space and defense systems. Whether you are a busy engineer, a technical expert or a project manager, you can enhance your understanding of complex systems in a short time.

ABOUT ATI AND THE INSTRUCTORS

Our mission here at the ATI is to provide expert training and the highest quality professional development in space, communications, defense, sonar, radar, and signal processing. We are not a one-size-fits-all educational facility. Our short classes include both introductory and advanced courses.

ATI’s instructors are world-class experts who are the best in the business. They are carefully selected for their ability to clearly explain advanced technology.

For example:

Robert Fry worked from 1979 to 2007 at The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory where he was a member of the Principal Professional Staff. He is now working at System Engineering Group (SEG) where he is Corporate Senior Staff and also serves as the company-wide technical advisor. Throughout his career he has been involved in the development of new combat weapon system concepts, development of system requirements, and balancing allocations within the fire control loop between sensing and weapon kinematic capabilities. He has worked on many aspects of the AEGIS combat system including AAW, BMD, AN/SPY-1, and multi-mission requirements development. Missile system development experience includes SM-2, SM-3, SM-6, Patriot, THAAD, HARPOON, AMRAAM, TOMAHAWK, and other missile systems.

Robert teaches ATI’s Combat Systems Engineering course

Wayne Tustin has been president of Equipment Reliability Institute (ERI), a specialized engineering school and consultancy he founded in Santa Barbara, CA, since 1995. His BSEE degree is from the University of Washington, Seattle. He is a licensed Professional Engineer in the State of California. Wayne’s first encounter with vibration was at Boeing/Seattle, performing what later came to be called modal tests, on the XB-52 prototype of that highly reliable platform. Subsequently he headed field service and technical training for a manufacturer of electrodynamic shakers, before establishing another specialized school on which he left his name.

Based on over 50 years of professional experience, Wayne has written several books and literally hundreds of articles dealing with practical aspects of vibration and shock measurement and testing.

Wayne teaches ATI’s Fundamentals of Random Vibration & Shock Testing course.

Thomas S. Logsdon, M.S

For more than 30 years, Thomas S. Logsdon, M. S., has worked on the Navstar GPS and other related technologies at the Naval Ordinance Laboratory, McDonnell Douglas, Lockheed Martin, Boeing Aerospace, and Rockwell International. His research projects and consulting assignments have included the Transit Navigation Satellites, The Tartar and Talos shipboard missiles, and the Navstar GPS. In addition, he has helped put astronauts on the moon and guide their colleagues on rendezvous missions headed toward the Skylab capsule. Some of his more challenging assignments have centered around constellation coverage studies, GPS performance enhancement, military applications, spacecraft survivability, differential navigation, booster rocket guidance using the GPS signals and shipboard attitude determination.

Tom Logsdon has taught short courses and lectured in thirty one different countries. He has written and published forty technical papers and journal articles, a dozen of which have dealt with military and civilian radionavigation techniques. He is also the author of twenty nine technical books on various engineering and scientific subjects. These include Understanding the Navstar, Orbital Mechanics: Theory and Applications, Mobile Communication Satellites, and The Navstar Global Positioning System.

Courses Mr. Logsdon teaches through ATI include:

Understanding Space

Fundamentals of Orbital & Launch Mechanics

GPS Technology – Solutions for Earth & Space and

Strapdown Inertial Navigation Systems

COURSE OUTLINE, SAMPLERS, AND NOTES

Determine for yourself the value of our courses before you sign up. See our samples (See Slide Samples) on some of our courses.

Or check out the new ATI channel on YouTube.

After attending the course you will receive a full set of detailed notes from the class for future reference, as well as a certificate of completion. Please visit our website for more valuable information.

DATES, TIMES AND LOCATIONS

For the dates and locations of all of our short courses, please access the links below.

Sincerely,

The ATI Courses Team

P.S. Call today for registration at 410-956-8805 or 888-501-2100 or access our website at www.ATIcourses.com. For general questions please email us at ATI@ATIcourses.com.

Mark N. Lewellen
Consultant/Instructor
Washington, DC
240-882-1234

Why Not Give Yourself the Gift of a Short Course this Holiday Season?

Washington, DC
Monday, November 29, 2010
Is One of These Yours?
Is One of These Yours?
Video Clip: Click to Watch
When Did You Last do Something for Your Career?

Since 1984, the Applied Technology Institute (ATI) has provided leading-edge public courses and onsite technical training to DoD and NASA personnel, as well as contractors. Our courses provide a practical overview of space and defense technologies which provide a strong foundation for understanding the issues that must be confronted in the use, regulation and development such complex systems.

ATI short courses are designed to help you keep your professional knowledge up-to-date.

Our short courses are designed for individuals involved in planning, designing, building, launching, and operating space and defense systems.

Whether you are a busy engineer, a technical expert or a project manager, you can enhance your understanding of complex systems in a short time. You will become aware of the basic vocabulary essential to interact meaningfully with your colleagues.

Course Outline, Samplers, and Notes

Determine for yourself the value of our courses before you sign up. See our samples (See Slide Samples) on some of our courses.

Or check out the new ATI channel on YouTube.

After attending the course you will receive a full set of detailed notes from the class for future reference, as well as a certificate of completion. Please visit our website for more valuable information.

About ATI and the Instructors

Our mission here at the Applied Technology Institute (ATI) is to provide expert training and the highest quality professional development in space, communications, defense, sonar, radar, and signal processing. We are not a one-size-fits-all educational facility. Our short classes include both introductory and advanced courses.

ATI’s instructors are world-class experts who are the best in the business. They are carefully selected for their ability to clearly explain advanced technology.

Dates, Times and Locations

For the dates and locations of all of our short courses, please access the links below.

Sincerely,

The ATI Courses Team

P.S Call today for registration at 410-956-8805 or 888-501-2100 or access our website at www.ATIcourses.com. For general questions please email us at ATI@ATIcourses.com.

Mark N. Lewellen
Consultant/Instructor
Washington, DC
240-882-1234

Enabling the sharing of airspace by manned and unmanned aircraft

The Australian Research Centre for Aerospace Automation’s (ARCAA) Smart Skies project, focusing on the development of technology to enable manned and unmanned aircraft to effectively share airspace, is approaching its final milestone.

The project, also involving Boeing Research and Technology-Australia, Insitu Pacific and the Queensland Government, is exploring development of three key enabling aviation technologies: an Automated Separation Management System capable of providing separation assurance in complex airspace environments; Sense and Act systems for manned and unmanned aircraft capable of collision avoidance of dynamic and static obstacles; and a Mobile Aircraft Tracking System (MATS) utilising a cost-effective radar and dependent surveillance systems.

The latest flight trials included all of the project elements, including a fixed-wing UAV and a modified Cessna flying in automatic mode, flying collision scenarios with simulated aircraft.

The final flight trial will take place in December this year, before project wrap-up and final reports in 2011, and, ultimately, the attempt to commercialise the Smart Skies intellectual property.

ARCAA acting director Dr Jonathon Roberts said a new research project was also on the cards. The collision-avoidance research is one of two key areas in which the Civil Aviation Safety Authority (CASA) requires proof that technology in unmanned aircraft can operate in a way equivalent to human pilots.

“In the future research we’re trying to hit the next problem: Smart Skies is all about collision avoidance and managing the avoidance of collisions; the next thing that CASA will require will be automatic landing systems,” Dr Roberts said. “So that if you have an engine failure or other catastrophic failure and you have to come down, you’ve got to be able to put it down in a safe place, so these will be vision systems that actually look at the ground and figure out where to land.

“That’s the next thing that has to be done before UAVs can fly over populous areas.”

The Smart Skies program was recently recognised at the Queensland Engineering Excellence Awards, where it won the ‘Control systems, networks, information processing and telecommunications’ category.

Top Ten Reasons Why You Should Attend a Short Technical Course from ATI

Washington, DC
Monday, November 15, 2010
HOT off the press!!!
HOT off the press!!!
Video Clip: Click to Watch
ATI specializes in short course technical training in space, communications, defense, sonar, radar, and signal processing

Here are the top ten reasons why you should attend a short technical course from ATI:

1. Our world class instructors love to teach

2. Both fundamental and advanced technical courses are offered

3. Convenient locations all around the country

4. Short courses take less than a week

5. Take only the classes you need

6. Our focus is on space and defense technology, just like yours

7. If there are eight or more people who are interested in a course, you save money if we bring the course to you.

8. If you have fifteen or more students, you save over fifty percent compared to a public course.

9. You will gain an understanding of the basic vocabulary needed in order to interact meaningfully with your colleagues.

10. After attending the course you will receive a full set of detailed notes from the class for future reference, as well as a certificate of completion

Since 1984, the Applied Technology Institute (ATI) has provided leading-edge public courses and onsite technical training to DoD and NASA personnel, as well as contractors. ATI short courses are designed to help you keep your professional knowledge up-to-date.

Our classes provide a practical overview of space and defense technologies which provide a strong foundation for understanding the issues that must be confronted in the use, regulation and development such complex systems. Whether you are a busy engineer, an aviation expert or a project manager, you can enhance your understanding of space-related systems without missing much time from work.

Course Outline, Samplers, and Notes

Determine for yourself the value of our courses before you sign up. See our samples (See Slide Samples) on some of our courses.

Or check out the new ATI channel on YouTube.

After attending the course you will receive a full set of detailed notes from the class for future reference, as well as a certificate of completion. Please visit our website for more valuable information.

About ATI and the Instructors

Our mission here at the Applied Technology Institute (ATI) is to provide expert training and the highest quality professional development in space, communications, defense, sonar, radar, and signal processing. We are not a one-size-fits-all educational facility. Our short classes include both introductory and advanced courses.

ATI’s instructors are world-class experts who are the best in the business. They are carefully selected for their ability to clearly explain advanced technology.

Dates, Times and Locations

For the dates and locations of all of our short courses, please access the links below.

Sincerely,

The ATI Courses Team

P.S. Call today for registration at 410-956-8805 or 888-501-2100 or access our website at ATIcourses. For general questions please email us at ATI@ATIcourses.com.

Mark N. Lewellen
Consultant/Instructor
Washington, DC
240-882-1234

Applied Oceanography & Integrated Ocean Observing System (IOOS) Funding

ATIcourses offer courses in Applied Oceanography and Underwater Acoustics. This announcement should interest some of our readers.

Resources
The U.S. Integrated Ocean Observing System (IOOS) has begun establishing a Catalog that will help people find ocean data. The IOOS vision is that users will be able to find the information they want, for the location and time period of interest, from all available IOOS partners without having to know in advance what partners operate the actual observing systems and data servers. The functionality is still somewhat basic, and not every IOOS observing platform is presently included. IOOS welcomes comments and problem reports; please send them to ioos.catalog@noaa.gov

NOAA will solicit proposals for competitive funding for Regional Ocean Partnership activities that include or emphasize regional Coastal and Marine Spatial Planning efforts. This competition will focus on advancing effective coastal and ocean management through regional ocean governance and the goals for national ocean policy set out in the July 2010 Final Recommendations of the Interagency Ocean Policy Task Force. Total anticipated funding is approximately $20,000,000 and is subject to the availability of FY 2011 appropriations. Details on eligibility, deadlines and proposal requirements are available at http://www.csc.noaa.gov/funding/. The anticipated number of awards ranges from twelve (12) to thirty (30), and will be adjusted based on available funding. The document can be read here.

Source info@macoora.org

Ocean Surveillance Ships – T-AGOS

Ocean Surveillance Ships – T-AGOS

Description
Ocean surveillance ships gather underwater acoustical data. The T-AGOS ships are operated by Military Sealift Command to support the anti-submarine warfare mission of the commanders of the Atlantic and Pacific Fleets.

Description: Ocean surveillance ships have a single mission to gather underwater acoustical data. The T-AGOS ships operate to support the anti-submarine warfare mission of the Commanders in chief of the Atlantic and Pacific Fleets.

Features: The ship is designed to tow an array of underwater listening devices to collect acoustical data. The ship also carries electronic equipment to process and transmit that data via satellite to shore stations for evaluation. The ship, the listening devices and electronic equipment are all part of a system called the Surveillance Towed Array System, or SURTASS.

Victorious class ocean surveillance ships are built on a Small Waterplane Twin Hull, or SWATH, design for greater stability at slow speeds in high latitudes under adverse weather conditions.
Impeccable class ships have a hull form based on that of Victorious. Acoustic systems should include an active low frequency towed array, which has a series of modules each of which houses two high-powered active transducers. These can be used with either mono or bistatic receivers.

http://usmilitary.about.com/library/milinfo/navyfacts/blsurveillanceships.htm

Ocean Observing Systems Offer Real-Time Data

In December 2009 the Canadian North-East Pacific Time-series Undersea Networked Experiments (NEPTUNE) system went live at four ocean sites on the Juan de Fuca plate.

Ocean observing systems offers unprecedented opportunities for all researchers involved in the ocean and earth sciences. The real-time interactive design of NEPTUNE Canada will give scientists the ability to respond to rare oceanic events, observe ocean change over decades, and adjust experiments and sampling over time, all via the Internet.

Many ocean observing systems are being commissioned in Europe, Asia and in the Americas.

This web page offers a good review of the Ocean Observing Systems
http://ocean-news.com/home/338-special-feature

NEPTUNE Canada
Last December, the first data transmissions were observed on the NEPTUNE Canada observatory. Four months later, over 267,000 data files occupying more than 4.4 Terabytes contain raw data, complex data and recordings from streaming instruments. The Bottom Pressure Recorder (BPR) at Barkley Canyon was the most prolific, recording over 10 million samples. In addition to the growing data, the total number of registered users rose from 220 in January to 5,781 at the end of March.

VENUS
While NEPTUNE Canada is “putting the pedal to the metal” in its opening lap, VENUS has shown steady performance over the past 4 years in Saainch Inlet and 2 years in the Strait of Georgia. Two successful maintenance cruises were accomplished over the past year (Figure 4). VENUS is now looking to extend its research footprint to the water surface and encompass greater experimentation capacity to a wider region without the installation of additional cables.

OOI Regional Scale Node (RSN)
The concept of a regional cabled ocean observatory – a system that would provide continuous high power and interactive real-time high-bandwidth data transfer to and from shore – began to be seriously explored by scientists at the University of Washington (UW) in the mid 1990s. The original NEPTUNE concept was nurtured and developed at UW, a vision based upon decades of experience in at-sea research in the Northeast Pacific Ocean. Subsequently, this past year, through its Ocean Observatories Initiative (OOI), the NSF awarded the implementation of the deepwater Regional Scale Nodes (RSN) to UW. The shallow-water, cabled coastal sites off the Oregon coast will be shared by the UW and Oregon State University.

KILROY
The Ocean Research & Conservation Association (ORCA), based in Fort Pierce, Florida, installed a beta test array of 9 Kilroy Water Monitoring Units (http://www.teamorca.org/cfiles/kilroy.cfm) on the Eastern shore of the Chesapeake Bay in April. ORCA’s Kilroys are a wireless network of remote semi-autonomous aquatic sensor systems. A central supervisory system directs operations of the remote systems, collects data and relays that via the Internet to a geospatial database.

ANTARES France
First results from ANTARES (Astronomy with a Neutrino Telescope and Abyss environmental RESearch project), a neutrino telescope residing in the Mediterranean Sea off the coast of Toulon, France (Figure 1), have recently been published (http://iopscience.iop.org /1742-6596/203/1/012122).

CYCOFOS – TWERC Cyprus
Last year’s ON&T update reported on CYCOFOS (Cyprus Coastal Forecasting and Observing System), the buoy-powered ocean observatory that has been operating off the southern coast of Cyprus for the past five years. This observatory is currently undergoing an extensive expansion which, when complete, will result in the prototype Tsunami Warning and Early Response System for Cyprus (TWERC).

DONET – Japan
As forecasted in last year’s ON&T update, NEC Corporation deployed the Dense Oceanfloor Network System for Earthquakes and Tsunamis (DONET) for Japan Agency for Marine-Earth Science and Technology (JAMSTEC) in April this year. DONET measurements are delivered in real-time, 24/7 via the submarine cable’s optical fiber. Data is first sent to a ground-based station in Mie where it is then relayed for analysis to institutions that include the Japan Meteorological Agency, the National Research Institute for Earth Science and Disaster Prevention (NIED) and a range of universities. These observations are expected to make valuable contributions to the speed and accuracy of earthquake and tsunami warnings as well as the improvement of earthquake prediction models.

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$10.7BN INDIAN SUBMARINE DEAL

ATIcourses presents courses on both underwater acoustics and submarine combats systems.

INDIA APPROVES $10.7BN SUBMARINE DEAL: The Indian Defence Ministry has approved a Rs500bn ($10.7bn) project to build six new-generation submarines for the Indian Navy. Under the program, which is codenamed Project-75 India (P-75I), all six diesel electric submarines will be built with air-independent propulsion systems and incorporate stealth, land-attack capability and a wide range of next-generation technologies, according to the Times of India. The request for proposal will be issued to global submarine manufacturers, including Rosoboronexport of Russia, DCNS/Armaris of France, HDW of Germany and Navantia of Spain. The construction cost for each of the six submarines will be around Rs85bn ($1.8bn). Three of the six submarines will be built at Mazagon Docks (MDL) in Mumbai. One will be built at Hindustan Shipyard in Visakhapatnam, in cooperation with a foreign company. The remaining two submarines are expected to be directly imported from the foreign collaborator or constructed at a private shipyard in India. The first submarine under P-75I is expected to be launched in six to seven years, according to a defence official. Currently, the Indian Navy operates an aging fleet of 15 diesel submarines.

Business Opportunities In Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill Response USCG BAA. Do you have the knowledge and technical training to respond rapidly?

The Federal government is looking for ideas in remote sensing and spill containment of the Deepwater Horizon oil spill. Do you have the knowledge and technical training to respond rapidly?

All submitted White Papers meeting the requirements of this BAA will be reviewed and evaluated as they are received. Each White Paper will undergo an initial screening. The initial screening will result in a determination that either (1) the White Paper has a potential for immediate benefit to the spill response effort, (2) the White Paper submission needs more detailed investigation or evaluation and will be forwarded to the appropriate Government Agency overseeing that portion of the Deepwater Horizon Response (EPA, MMS, NOAA, or USCG), or (3) the White Paper submission does not support this incident. A Contracting Officer will provide a response to all properly submitted White papers identifying the initial screening determination.

This announcement constitutes a Broad Agency Announcement (BAA) issued under the provisions of the Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR), Subparts 6.102(d)(2) and 35.016, to provide for the submission of White Papers (written description of the idea) in support of the Deepwater Horizon Response under the following five technology gap areas:

1. Oil Sensing Improvements to Response and Detection
(For example, tactical oil sensing, surface oil tracking and reporting, submerged oil detection, submerged oil tracking and reporting, etc.)
2. Oil Wellhead Control and Submerged Oil Response
(For example, wellhead spill control, wellhead shutoff measures, submerged oil collection, submerged oil treatment, etc.)
3. Traditional Oil Spill Response Technologies
(For example, booms, skimmers, surface collections techniques, absorbents, near- and on-shore response, innovative applications not commonly used for oil spill response, disposal, etc.)
4. Alternative Oil Spill Response Technologies
(For example, In-situ burn, alternative chemical treatments, innovative applications not commonly used for oil response, etc.)
5. Oil Spill Damage Assessment and Restoration
(For example, damage assessment techniques, tracking surface restoration technologies and submerged restoration technologies, etc.)

Paper copies of this announcement will not be issued. Offerors shall respond to this BAA by electronically submitting a White Paper at www.homeport.uscg.mil/RDC-BAA-DHR. All contractual and technical questions regarding this BAA must be in writing and sent to RDC-BAA-DHR [at] uscg [dot] mil. Informational questions and associated answers (i.e. FAQs) will be periodically posted at http://www.homeport.uscg.mil/RDC-BAA-DHR-FAQ.

White Papers shall provide technology ideas/solutions to support the five technology gap areas identified above. Offerors are hereby notified that it is highly likely that White Papers may be shared with several different Government agencies and other interested parties (which may include contractors) for review and consideration.

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