Happy Groundhog Day!

We are halfway between the winter solstice and the spring equinox, also known as, Groundhog day!  If you want to know more about the origins of this tradition, you can find that at the link below, but the story involves bears and badgers, and Germans and Christians, and superstition and science.  You can’t make this stuff up, and you can’t tell the story any better than The Old Farmers Almanac.  Check it out at….

https://www.almanac.com/content/groundhog-day-history-meaning-folklore?

It will be a stretch to relate Groundhog day to courses offered by ATI, but we will give it a try.   That pesky groundhog needs to draw on his Remote Sensing abilities in order to have such a wonderful batting average. 

If you want to learn more about Remote Sensing, consider one of the Remote Sensing Courses offered by ATi, like perhaps…
Optical & Remote Sensing
or Microwave Remote Sensing
or Geomatics – GIS, GPS and Remote Sensing
or Directions in Space Remote Sensing.

Lastly, and SPOILER ALERT….Spring will be coming early this year.  I can’t wait.

Groundhog Day 2019:The Prediction and Photos

Update on Story -Rover Was Delivered to Mars by an ATLAS Rocket Update

The Applied Technology Institute published (01/23/2019) a story on the Curiosity Rover Was Delivered to Mars in 2015. Space News posted a related article on (01/24/2019).
https://www.space.com/43104-mars-rover-opportunity-landing-15th-anniversary.html?

This was the original ATI post
http://www.aticourses.com/blog/index.php/2019/01/23/recall-that-curi…s-rocket-in-2011/ ‎

Funny Military Dog Photos

I enjoyed these funny Military Dog Photos. These have nothing to do with ATI’s technical training classes, but I have always enjoyed dogs. None of these military dogs will attend ATI’s courses.

The Postal Service saw my Funny Military Dog Photos.
It will recognize the Military Dogs with stamps this year.

There will be one stamp each for the German shepherd, Labrador retriever, Belgian Malinois and Dutch shepherd breeds, which are all types of military working dogs.

https://www.military.com/undertheradar/2019/01/24/8-funny-working-dog-memes-thatll-make-you-wag-your-tail.html?

New Horizons’ Best-Yet Detailed View of Ultima Thule

The best-yet image of Ultima Thule taken by the wide-angle Multicolor Visible Imaging Camera (MVIC) is now online. The image shows a large circular depression, and many smaller depressions. These were not visible in the earlier, lower resolution image. Ultima Thule measures approximately 30 kilometers (18 miles) in diameter, and is irregularly shaped. Even better future images are expected.

The principal investigator, Alan Stern, as well as eight other systems designers, teach Spacecraft Design courses for the Applied Technology Institute (ATI or ATIcourses). If you are working in Space and Spacecraft it is good to take classes and learn from real-world experts who have designed and operated successful spacecraft. Why not learn from the best? Click on this blog post to see the New Horizons designers and the specific classes that they teach.

New Horizons Spacecraft Approaches Ultima Thule

Applied Technology Institute has been following the New Horizons Mission to Pluto for years (since launch in 2006). Now New Horizons continued to the Kuiper Belt object (KBO) nicknamed MU69 Ultima Thule. New Horizons fly past and imaged the Ultima Thule on January 1, 2019. High-resolution images are only now being transmitted back and released to the public.

The best source for these images is http://pluto.jhuapl.edu/News-Center/News-Article.php
This link provides an ongoing source of featured images.
http://pluto.jhuapl.edu/Galleries/Featured-Images/index.php

New Horizons is approximately 4.13 billion miles (6.64 billion kilometers) from Earth, operating normally and speeding away from the Sun (and Ultima Thule) at more than 31,500 miles (50,700 kilometers) per hour. At that distance, a radio signal reaches Earth six hours and nine minutes after leaving the spacecraft.

Recall That Curiosity Rover Was Delivered to Mars by an ATLAS Rocket in 2011

There are so many Space Exploration Missions that are on the front page of the papers now, New Horizons for example.  Let us not forget about ongoing missions that are no longer getting as much publicity at they may deserve, JPL Mars Science Lab Curiosity Rover Mission for example.

The Curiosity Rover Mission was launched in November 2011 for an 8-month trip to Mars.  Once on Mars, the Curiosity Mission was expected to last 2 years.  Amazingly, the Curiosity Rover Mission is still in progress, and periodic updates on the status of that mission are still being posted at https://mars.nasa.gov/msl/mission/mars-rover-curiosity-mission-updates/

The success of that mission did not start when the Rover started sending back amazing pictures from Mars.  The success of that mission started when the Rocket and Launch Vehicle propelled Rover into Space.    The Atlas V-541 Rocket selected for this mission and built by Boeing Corp and Lockheed Martin Corp.  performed as designed.  If it had not performed as well as it did, the entire mission could have been in jeopardy.  Rockets and Launch Vehicles are truly acritical component of every mission.

ATI is offering a Course on Rocket and Launch Vehicles in Columbia, Maryland from February 11 to 14, 2019.  The course is being taught by Edward Keith, a multi-discipline Launch Vehicle System Engineer, specializing in integration of launch vehicle technology, design, modeling and business strategies.  There is still time to enroll in this class, and you will be finished in time to get home for dinner on Valentine’s day! 

Please consider learning more about this ATI offering, and enroll in the ATI class, by going to https://www.aticourses.com/rockets_launch_vehicles.html

 

Video – USS South Dakota SSN 790 will join the U.S. Navy submarine force in February 2019

Take a Tour of America’s Newest Nuclear Submarine Virginia class
USS South Dakota SSN 790 will join the U.S. Navy submarine force in February 2019

PHYSICAL CHARACTERISTICS
Overall Length: 377 ft
Extreme Beam: 33 ft
Max Navigational Draft: 32 ft
Full Displacement: 7800 tons

Hull Material: Steel hull, steel superstructure.
No. of Propellers: 1
Propulsion Type: Steam Turbine (Nuclear)
Accommodations: Officers: 15
Enlisted: 117
Total 132 people onbord
Video Link
https://www.popularmechanics.com/military/navy-ships/a25780066/uss-south-dakota-americas-newest-nuclear-submarine/

Also see ATI’s submarines course.
https://www.aticourses.com/Submarines_and_Submariners_Introduction.html

Summary
This three-day course is designed for engineers in the field of submarine R&D and Operational Test and Evaluation. It is an introductory course presenting the fundamental philosophy of submarine design, submerged operation and combat system employment as they are managed by a battle-tested submarine organization that all-in-all make a US submarine a very cost-effective warship at sea—and under it.

Today’s US submarine tasking is discussed in consonance with the strategy and policy of the US, and the goals, objectives, mission, functions, tasks, responsibilities, and roles of the US Navy as they are so funded. Submarine warfare is analyzed referencing some calculations for a Benefits-to-Cost analysis, in that, Submarines Sink Ships!

From this course you will gain a better understanding of submarine warships being stealth-oriented, cost-effective combat systems at sea. Those who have worked with specific submarine sub-systems will find that this course will clarify the rationale and essence of their interface with one another. Attendees will receive copies of the presentation along with some relevant white papers.

What You Will Learn
Differences in submarine types (SSN/SSBN/ SSGN)
Submarine onboard organization and day to day operations
Basic Fundamentals of submarine systems and sensors
Submarine Mission profiles
Basics of Submarine Warfare tactical and operational control
How submarines support national military objectives
Makeup and function of the Submarine Support Enterprise
How the sea impacts submarine operations
Submarine Maintenance Cycles – Supporting the Tip of the Spear

New Horizons: Watch the Ultima Thule Flyby —- In-Depth Coverage Starts Dec 31

On New Year’s Day, the New Horizons spacecraft, which flew past Pluto in 2015, will be making another flyby. NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft has been whizzing toward Ultima Thule ever since it completed its primary mission: the historic Pluto flyby of July 2015.

The overall trip was 13 years and 4 Billion miles. NASA estimates that the probe will arrive at its new destination at 12:33 A.M. Eastern time on New Year’s Day (01/01/2019) and engineers have devised a carefully-calculated trajectory to ensure it gets to Thule safely. This will be the most distant flyby ever conducted.

Follow the news at http://pluto.jhuapl.edu/News-Center/Where-to-Watch.php

I have been personally inspired by the success of the New Horizons’ mission. I was present at JHU/APL for the July 2015 Pluto flyby and briefings. Many of the New Horizons engineers continue to teach ATI engineering and science training courses based on their first-hand real-world experience. This has been a high success, 13-year project that may continue to other new objects as the spacecraft is healthy and still performing well. I hope so.

See their information at

New Horizons Spacecraft Approaches Ultima Thule

Information Timeline ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Date Time Event
31 Monday December, 2018
2:00-3:00 pm EST Press briefing: Ultima Thule flyby science and operations preview. Panelists include Alan Stern, New Horizons principal investigator, Southwest Research Institute; Helene Winters, New Horizons project manager, Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory; John Spencer, New Horizons deputy project scientist, Southwest Research Institute; Frederic Pelletier, navigation team lead, KinetX, Inc.

3:00-4:00 pm EST Q&A: Ask the New Horizons Team. Questions from social media (#askNewHorizons) answered by Alex Parker, New Horizons co-investigator, Southwest Research Institute; Kelsi Singer, co-investigator, Southwest Research Institute; Gabe Rogers, New Horizons deputy mission systems engineer, Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory

8:00-11:00 pm EST Panel discussion on the exploration of small worlds (8-9 pm); Ultima Thule flyby countdown events; mission updates

1 Tuesday January, 2019
12:02 am EST Global song release: Brian May, New Horizons contributing scientist and Queen guitarist, “New Horizons (Ultima Thule Mix)”

12:15-12:45 am EST Live coverage of countdown to closest approach (12:33 am); real-time flyby simulations

10:15 – 10:45 am EST Live coverage of New Horizons signal-acquisition activities in the Mission Operations Center, confirming spacecraft status and flyby success

11:30 am– 12:30 pm EST Press briefing: Spacecraft status, latest images and data download schedule. Panelists include Alan Stern, New Horizons principal investigator, Southwest Research Institute; Alice Bowman, New Horizons mission operations manager, Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory; Hal Weaver, New Horizons project scientist, Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory; Chris Hersman, New Horizons mission systems engineer, Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory.

2 Wednesday January, 2019
2:00-3:00 pm EST Press briefing: Science results from Ultima Thule.Panelists include Alan Stern, New Horizons principal investigator, Southwest Research Institute; Jeff Moore, New Horizons co-investigator, NASA Ames Research Center; Cathy Olkin, New Horizons deputy project scientist, Southwest Research Institute; Will Grundy, New Horizons co-investigator, Lowell Observatory.

3 Thursday January, 2019
2:00-3:00 pm EST Press briefing: Science results from Ultima Thule.Panelists TBD.

Previous articles about New Horizons on ATI’s website.

Related blog post:
1. https://www.aticourses.com/blog/index.php/2018/12/19/new-horizons-spacecraft-approaches-ultima-thule/
2. NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft is 15.96 astronomical units (about 2.39 billion kilometers, or 1.48 billion miles) from the Sun
3. NASA New Horizons spacecraft on the way to rendezvous with planet Pluto
4. The New Horizons Mission to Pluto–Ten Experts Who Worked Behind-the-Scenes On the New Horizons Mission and Who Teach for ATIcourses.
5. New Horizons: Recollections of Ground System Engineer, Steve Gemeny
6. New Horizons – This was almost a disaster, but was saved by knowledgeable scientists.
7. New Horizons Flyover of Pluto

New Horizons Spacecraft Approaches Ultima Thule

The Kuiper Belt is a vastly-unexplored region of the solar system filled with Kuiper Belt Objects (KBOs), and NASA expects to learn more about these objects after the new year; that’s when the space agency’s New Horizons probe will visit an icy body known to astronomers as Ultima Thule(previously 2014 MU69).

NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft has been whizzing toward Ultima Thule ever since it completed its primary mission: the historic Pluto flyby of 2015. NASA estimates that the probe will arrive at its new destination at 12:33 A.M. Eastern time on New Year’s Day and engineers have devised a carefully-calculated trajectory to ensure it gets there safely.

The Kuiper Belt is full of variously-sized space rocks, much like the asteroid belt found between Mars and Jupiter. That said, NASA’s New Horizons hazard watch team has been on the constant lookout for any hazards that could prevent New Horizons from reaching its destination safely.

New Horizons Space craft has been in the news for a while.

A few of ATI instructors have been a part of this groundbreaking project.

1. Dr. Alan Stern http://aticourses.com/planetary_science.htm

2. Eric Hoffman

http://www.aticourses.com/effective_design_reviews.htm

http://www.aticourses.com/spacecraft_quality.htm

http://www.aticourses.com/satellite_rf_communications.htm

3. Chris DeBoy

http://www.aticourses.com/Satellite_Communications_Design_Engineering.htm

4. Dr. Mark E. Pittelkau http://www.aticourses.com/attitude_determination.htm

5. Douglas Mehoke http://www.aticourses.com/spacecraft_thermal_control.htm

6. John Penn http://www.aticourses.com/fundamentals_of_RF_engineering.html

7. Timothy Cole

http://www.aticourses.com/space_based_lasers.htm

http://www.aticourses.com/Tactical_Intelligence_Surveillance_Reconnaissance_System_Engineering.htm

http://www.aticourses.com/Wireless_Sensor_Networking.htm

8. Robert Moore http://www.aticourses.com/satellite_rf_communications.htm

9. Jay Jenkinshttp://www.aticourses.com/spacecraft_solar_arrays.htm

 

More info: 

 
 
Applied Technology Institute (ATICourses) offers a variety of courses on Space and Satellite Technology https://www.aticourses.com/catalog_of_all_ATI_courses.htm#space

 

Related blog post:

NASA’s New Horizons spacecraft is 15.96 astronomical units (about 2.39 billion kilometers, or 1.48 billion miles) from the Sun

NASA New Horizons spacecraft on the way to rendezvous with planet Pluto

The New Horizons Mission to Pluto–Ten Experts Who Worked Behind-the-Scenes On the New Horizons Mission and Who Teach for ATIcourses.

New Horizons: Recollections of Ground System Engineer, Steve Gemeny

New Horizons – This was almost a disaster, but was saved by knowledgeable scientists.

New Horizons Flyover of Pluto

New Images Show the Record-Breaking Wildfire Season, California Shows Nine New Scars

Space remote sensing can provide the big picture of the Record-Breaking Fires in California. We had family members living in Paradise, California. Their home and their veterinary business were totally destroyed. They have to effectively restart their lives.

Those burn scars include the traces of the Camp Fire that destroyed the town of Paradise in mid-November. That fire became the deadliest fire in California’s history after it killed at least 85 people.

See
https://www.space.com/42554-california-wildfires-2018-burn-scars-from-space.htm

If you want to learn more about Space and Space-Based Remote Sensing visit our catalog-of-all courses
https://www.aticourses.com/catalog_of_all_ATI_courses.htm#space

Layered Missile Defense Article and Comments

Missile Defense is a complex problem for the US and US allies such as Israel and Poland. The US Department of Defense has a layered approach of different systems to detect threat missile launches and then to intercept and destroy the incoming missiles.

 Defense systems include

1. Phalanx Close-In Weapons System (CIWS)

2. Terminal High Altitude Area Defense (THAAD)

3. Aegis Ballistic Missile Defense System

4. Israel’s Iron Dome

5. SkyCeptor This is a good summary article sponsored by Raytheon.

https://breakingdefense.com/2018/10/the-present-and-future-of-layered-missile-defense/?

Equally as interesting are the detailed comments from the Breaking Defense readers that appear at the end of the article. The comments focus on costs and the relative costs of the missiles used by the attackers (say for example North Korea or Iran) and the missile defense system missiles. ATI is interested in your comments about the article and open source articles about Missile Defense Systems cost and performance. ATI has many relevant technical training courses that help to understand the technology and components of Missile Defense Systems. These courses can be presented on-site at your facility or at publically scheduled open enrollment courses. Please email your requests to ati@aticourses.com

https://www.aticourses.com/catalog_of_all_ATI_courses.htm#radar These courses help understand the Missile Defense technologies

1. Aegis Ballistic Missile Defense- https://www.aticourses.com/Aegis_Ballistic_Missile_Defense.html

2. Aegis Combat System Engineering- https://www.aticourses.com/Aegis_Combat_System_Engineering.html

3. AESA Radar and Its Applications https://www.aticourses.com/Modern_AESA_Radara_Principles.html

4. C4ISR Requirements, Principles& Systems https://www.aticourses.com/c4isr_requirement_principles.htm

5. Electronic Warfare Against the New Threat https://www.aticourses.com/Electroni_Warfare_Agains_New_Threat_Environment.html

These courses directly focus on missiles and missile defense.

1. Making Decisions in Missile Defense- https://www.aticourses.com/making_decisions_in_missile_defense.htm

2. Missile Analysis- https://www.aticourses.com/missile_systems_analysis.htm

3. Missile Guidance https://www.aticourses.com/Modern_Missile_Guidance.html

4. Missile System Design https://www.aticourses.com/tactical_missile_design.htm

5. Modeling, Simulation of Aerospace Vehicles https://www.aticourses.com/Modeling_Simulation_Analysis_of_Aerospace_Vehicles.html

6. Modeling & Simulation of Missiles in 6 DoF https://www.aticourses.com/Modeling&SimulationMissilesin6DoF.html

7. Tactical Strategic Missile Guidance Please email your requests for more information to ati@aticourses.com