Even a bad day of fishing beats a good day at the office…ATIcourses has a great day fishing on the Chesapeake.

Jim Jenkins and Ed McCarthy (and families) from ATIcourses.com went fishing on April 28, 2009. We left from Chesapeake Beach, Maryland with Captain Russel on the Carol G. The Captain used high frequency sonar to locate the best fishing holes and to alert when fish past near the boat. He also used a high-tech planar board […]

Jim Jenkins and Ed McCarthy (and families) from ATIcourses.com went fishing on April 28, 2009. We left from Chesapeake Beach, Maryland with Captain Russel on the Carol G. The Captain used high frequency sonar to locate the best fishing holes and to alert when fish past near the boat. He also used a high-tech planar board ( or out-rigger sled) to fish more lines to both sides of the boat.

It was a clear, sunny day. The fishing was great. Six rockfish (also known as striped bass) were caught in about 6 hours. The biggest were 47 and 37 inches. Both are really big fish. The 47 incher approaches the state record holder ( 52 inches in length, but more weight). The fish was shared by all and was mighty tasty.

http://somd.com/news/headlines/2009/9861.shtml

During the trophy season that runs through May 15, anglers may catch one striped bass per day measuring over 28 inches in the lower Potomac River and throughout much of the Chesapeake Bay.

The striped bass, named the official fish of the State of Maryland in 1965, gets its name from the seven or eight dark stripes that run from head to tail. The fish has an olive green back, fading to light silver on its sides, with a white underside. Known for its size and ability to put up a good fight, the striped bass is considered by many to be the premier sport fish on the Bay. It is also mighty tasty.

One thought on “Even a bad day of fishing beats a good day at the office…ATIcourses has a great day fishing on the Chesapeake.

  1. More information about Rockfish – Striped Bass

    Striped bass
    Morone saxatilis
    (A.K.A. Rockfish, Rock, Striper)

    Key Distinguishing Markings:

    * Striped bass is a silvery fish that gets its name from the seven or eight dark, continuous stripes along the side of its body.
    * The body is compressed.
    * Dorsal fins are well separated,
    * Caudal fin is forked, olive green, blue, or black dorsally.

    Size:

    * Striped bass can grow as long as 60 inches.
    The records are by weight. However the two record holders in MD had 52 in fish, so 47 inches is huge and approaching the size of the record holders for many years time. The boat captain had only two larger rockfish (both 49 inches) in all of 2008’s season.

    Distribution:

    * On the Atlantic coast, striped bass range from St. Lawrence River, Canada to St. Johns River, Florida, although they are most prevalent from Maine to North Carolina.
    * Striped bass tend to move north to nearshore waters of the New England coast during the summer, and south to the North Carolina/Virginia Capes during the winter.
    * The east coast migratory population is composed of three major stocks – Hudson, Chesapeake, and Roanoke.
    * The Chesapeake Stock
    o The striped bass stock within Chesapeake Bay is composed of pre-migratory fish, primarily ages 10 and younger, and coastal migratory striped bass range in age from age 2 to more than age 30.
    o Mature resident and migratory striped bass move into tidal freshwater in early spring to spawn.
    o After spawning, migratory fish return to the coast.
    o Most spend the summer and early fall months in middle New England near-shore waters.
    o During the late fall and early winter, coastal striped bass migrate south to winter off the North Carolina/Virginia Capes.

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