How are the Navy’s ships are Being Named ?

Applied Technology Institute (ATI) offers many (200+) Defense-related Courses. One area of ATI’s focus involves the defense technologies that help support Naval ships including Radar, Sonar, Electronic Warfare (EW) and Missiles. See https://www.aticourses.com/courses/ Currently scheduled courses https://www.aticourses.com/schedule/ This blog post was based on a USNA-At-Large group newsletter. On July 13, 2012, the Navy submitted to […]

Applied Technology Institute (ATI) offers many (200+) Defense-related Courses. One area of ATI’s focus involves the defense technologies that help support Naval ships including Radar, Sonar, Electronic Warfare (EW) and Missiles.

See https://www.aticourses.com/courses/

Currently scheduled courses https://www.aticourses.com/schedule/

This blog post was based on a USNA-At-Large group newsletter. On July 13, 2012, the Navy submitted to Congress a 73-page report on the Navy’s policies and practices for naming ships. For ship types now being procured for the Navy, or recently procured for the Navy, naming rules can be summarized as follows:
  • The first Ohio replacement ballistic missile submarine (SSBN-826) has been named Columbia in honor of the District of Columbia, but the Navy has not stated what the naming rule for these ships will be.
  • Virginia (SSN-774) class attack submarines are being named for states.     
    • Aircraft carriers are generally named for past U.S. Presidents. Of the past 14, 10 were named for past U.S. Presidents, and 2 for Members of Congress. These links show the Aircraft Carriers locations and their carrier group.

http://www.gonavy.jp/CVLocation.html

https://news.usni.org/2014/08/18/sunk-sold-scraped-saved-fate-americas-aircraft-carrier 

  • Destroyers are being named for deceased members of the Navy, Marine Corps, and Coast Guard, including Secretaries of the Navy.
  •       The Navy has not yet announced a naming rule for its planned new class of FFG(X) frigates, the first of which the Navy wants to procure in FY2021. Previous classes of U.S. Navy frigates, like Navy destroyers, were generally named for naval leaders and heroes.
  • Littoral Combat Ships (LCSs) are being named for regionally important U.S. cities and communities.
  • Amphibious assault ships are being named for important battles in which U.S. Marines played a prominent part, and for famous earlier U.S. Navy ships that were not named for battles.
  • San Antonio (LPD-17) class amphibious ships are being named for major U.S.cities and communities, and cities and communities attacked on September 11, 2001.
  • John Lewis (TAO-205) class oilers are being named for people who fought for civil rights and human rights.
  • Expeditionary Fast Transports (EPFs) are being named for small U.S. cities.
  • Expeditionary Transport Docks (ESDs) and Expeditionary Sea Bases (ESBs) are being named for famous names or places of historical significance to U.S. Marines.
  • Navajo (TATS-6) class towing, salvage, and rescue ships are being named for prominent Native Americans or Native American tribes.
  • Since 1974, at least 21 U.S. military ships have been named for persons who were living at the time the name was announced. The most recent instance occurred on May 6, 2019, when the Navy announced that it was naming the destroyer DDG-51 for former Senator Sam Nunn.
The Navy’s Report to Congress is at: https://fas.org/sgp/crs/weapons/RS22478.pdf

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