Do you support or oppose the new Obama space plan ? Will the plan help or hurt NASA? Please post your comments here

NASA’a Future Space Program President Obama laid out more details on his future space program. Please give us your comments of whether this will be good for NASA or a mistake. ATI conducted a survey before the speech and 60 percent of the engineers and scientists who attended our professional development courses stated they thought […]
NASA’a Future Space Program President Obama laid out more details on his future space program. Please give us your comments of whether this will be good for NASA or a mistake. ATI conducted a survey before the speech and 60 percent of the engineers and scientists who attended our professional development courses stated they thought the new plan would hurt NASA or that they would oppose the plan , 32 percent supported the plan, and 8 percent were undecided. You can read their comments in earlier posts. The results of the survey and many remarks, both pro and con, are provided in an earlier blog posts. There were strong opinions by professionals in the field. Page down for previous parts of this post Overview of the Issue and supporting Opinions – Part 1 , Part 2 Opposing Opinions and Part 3- Undecided or Open Positions
Read ATI press release on the subject here..
  • Do you Support or Oppose the new Obama space plan?
  • Will it help or hurt NASA?
To comment: Scroll to the bottom of the post and click ‘comment’.
To post anonymously, use “guest” or “anon” in the name field.
Your e-mail will not appear on the blog.

A full transcript of his speech is at this link. http://www.nasa.gov/news/media/trans/obama_ksc_trans.html Addition information is at http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20100414/ap_on_sc/us_sci_nasa_future http://www.chron.com/disp/story.mpl/space/6962725.html Speech Excerpts are below.

So NASA, from the start, several months ago when I issued my budget, was one of the areas where we didn’t just maintain a freeze but we actually increased funding by $6 billion. By doing that we will ramp up robotic exploration of the solar system, including a probe of the Sun’s atmosphere; new scouting missions to Mars and other destinations; and an advanced telescope to follow Hubble, allowing us to peer deeper into the universe than ever before. Now, I recognize that some have said it is unfeasible or unwise to work with the private sector in this way. I disagree. The truth is, NASA has always relied on private industry to help design and build the vehicles that carry astronauts to space, from the Mercury capsule that carried John Glenn into orbit nearly 50 years ago, to the space shuttle Discovery currently orbiting overhead. By buying the services of space transportation — rather than the vehicles themselves — we can continue to ensure rigorous safety standards are met. But we will also accelerate the pace of innovations as companies — from young startups to established leaders — compete to design and build and launch new means of carrying people and materials out of our atmosphere. In addition, as part of this effort, we will build on the good work already done on the Orion crew capsule. I’ve directed Charlie Bolden to immediately begin developing a rescue vehicle using this technology, so we are not forced to rely on foreign providers if it becomes necessary to quickly bring our people home from the International Space Station. And this Orion effort will be part of the technological foundation for advanced spacecraft to be used in future deep space missions. In fact, Orion will be readied for flight right here in this room. (Applause.) Next, we will invest more than $3 billion to conduct research on an advanced “heavy lift rocket” — a vehicle to efficiently send into orbit the crew capsules, propulsion systems, and large quantities of supplies needed to reach deep space. In developing this new vehicle, we will not only look at revising or modifying older models; we want to look at new designs, new materials, new technologies that will transform not just where we can go but what we can do when we get there. And we will finalize a rocket design no later than 2015 and then begin to build it. (Applause.) And I want everybody to understand: That’s at least two years earlier than previously planned — and that’s conservative, given that the previous program was behind schedule and over budget. So I’m proposing — in part because of strong lobbying by Bill and by Suzanne, as well as Charlie — I’m proposing a $40 million initiative led by a high-level team from the White House, NASA, and other agencies to develop a plan for regional economic growth and job creation. And I expect this plan to reach my desk by August 15th. (Applause.) It’s an effort that will help prepare this already skilled workforce for new opportunities in the space industry and beyond. But you and I know this is a false choice. We have to fix our economy. We need to close our deficits. But for pennies on the dollar, the space program has fueled jobs and entire industries. For pennies on the dollar, the space program has improved our lives, advanced our society, strengthened our economy, and inspired generations of Americans. And I have no doubt that NASA can continue to fulfill this role. (Applause.) But that is why — but I want to say clearly to those of you who work for NASA, but to the entire community that has been so supportive of the space program in this area: That is exactly why it’s so essential that we pursue a new course and that we revitalize NASA and its mission — not just with dollars, but with clear aims and a larger purpose.

One thought on “Do you support or oppose the new Obama space plan ? Will the plan help or hurt NASA? Please post your comments here

  1. (1) Constellation had obvious flaws (most obvious was a schedule that precluded development of a cost effective and sustainable space architecture design). Fixing Constellation by relieving the schedule demand and directing an integrated, sustainable design would have been preferable.
    (2) The old “new” approach of technology development without fitting it into an analysis-guided system architecture process and development milestones will waste taxpayer dollars and indefinitely delay the missions of which we all dream.
    (3) The President’s new direction had a sense of naivete’, as if a “Star Trek” magic bullet was waiting in the wings to be discovered and exploited by commercial companies. The physics of space access is tough and requires creative ideas to make it affordable, not just market economics (launch rate being the biggest driver of reduced cost). Creative government/industry collaboration and cooperation is necessary to make it work.
    (4) The disruption to the NASA and contractor work force resulting from the short time frame and non-collaborative pre-planning for the changes is extremely demoralizing and almost cruel in the economic environment we are currently experiencing.

Comments are closed.