Sonar to Search for Black Box

FINDING THE SPOT “They’ll have to work with flotsam,” he said. “You get the wind and current data and work back. You have to distinguish between the light material that is on the surface and exposed to the wind, and the buoyant material, which is floating, but just under the surface and not exposed to […]
FINDING THE SPOT “They’ll have to work with flotsam,” he said. “You get the wind and current data and work back. You have to distinguish between the light material that is on the surface and exposed to the wind, and the buoyant material, which is floating, but just under the surface and not exposed to the winds.” Chris German, the chief scientist for the deep submergence group at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute on Cape Cod, said that even with two debris fields located miles apart, the backtracking can be done. “You look at the ocean currents and wind and determine where the debris was 10 hours before, then 10 hours before that. You do that all the way back to when you think the crash occurred.” Fish said that the hindcasting could trace out the path up to 30 days back in time http://news.aol.com/article/air-france-jet-likely-broke-apart-above/511716?flv=1 Video explaining the sonar search is shown at http://www.truveo.com/underwater-search-for-flight-447-black-boxes/id/2305843012055716837

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  1. A French research ship with a submersible capable of diving to a depth of 20,000 feet (6,000 meters) is steaming to the area. The French transport Ministry says the ship carries equipment “able to explore more than 97% of the ocean bed area, specifically in the search area.” In some spots, Atlantic is more than 20,000 feet deep in the area where searchers found the floating debris.

    The submersible will be listening for the distinctive “pinging” noise that these boxes are designed to emit once they are submerged in water. They are supposed to “ping” for thirty days in water as deep as 20,000 feet. Sonar used by surface ships is only good to about a thousand feet of depth – so it is essential to send some “ears” deep beneath the sea in order to find the boxes. These sonar devices can be towed by ships or ply the deep on their own power.

    http://www.boingboing.net/2009/06/03/miles-obrien-bloggin.html

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