Whales Listening and Underwater Sound

Whales Listening and Underwater Sound   There are many sites that record and stream to the Internet the sounds of underwater hydrophones. Links to some are listed below. Many are designed to listen to whales and dolphins. Some sites even combine web cams and live underwater sounds.   Some links are listed below. http://www.whalesong.net/ http://www.awi.de/en/research/new_technologies/marine_observing_systems/ocean_acoustics/palaoa/palaoa_livestream/ […]

Whales Listening and Underwater Sound

 

There are many sites that record and stream to the Internet the sounds of underwater hydrophones. Links to some are listed below. Many are designed to listen to whales and dolphins. Some sites even combine web cams and live underwater sounds.

 

Some links are listed below.

http://www.whalesong.net/

http://www.awi.de/en/research/new_technologies/marine_observing_systems/ocean_acoustics/palaoa/palaoa_livestream/

http://blog.wired.com/wiredscience/2008/05/hydrophones-hel.html

http://orcasound.net/

http://cetus.ucsd.edu/sounds.html

 

Other marine audio streams listed by http://orcasound.net/

 These

http://www.whalesong.net/  is a project inspired by the beauty of oceans. This beauty includes not only the visual aspects of the water planet we live on, but also a mysterious and incredible world of sound, which whales and dolphins use to navigate and communicate across vast oceans. The vocalizations of these ancient cetaceans have inspired music, poetry, scientific discovery, and perhaps even languages and cultures.

http://www.whalesong.net/ magnificent marine mammals and the messages that they communicate face new challenges as the sonic world of the seas becomes the testing ground for high powered sonar systems and new military technologies, scientific research that utilizes high intensity sound, undersea explosions related to the search for oil and minerals, as well as other human activities. Global warming, carbon dioxide dumping, radioactive and chemical pollution, and commercial whaling are other threats.

2   http://www.awi.de/en/research/new_technologies/marine_observing_systems/ocean_acoustics/palaoa/palaoa_livestream/

 

PALAOA – Transmitting live from the Ocean below the Antarctic Ice

Overview PALAOA area

You can listen to the underwater sound of the Antarctic Ocean with a delay of a few seconds here.  

– should work on any computer right off the box, otherwise please check your browser or default multimedia player settings.

Please note, this transmission is not optimized for easy listening, but for scientific research. It is highly compressed (24kBit Ogg-Vorbis), so sound quality is far from perfect. Additionally, animal voices may be very faint. Amplifier settings are a compromise between picking up distant animals and not overdriving the system by nearby calving icebergs. So you might need to pump up the volume – but beware of sudden extremely loud events. http://blog.wired.com/wiredscience/2008/05/hydrophones-hel.html

Hydrophones Help Scientists Pinpoint, Protect Right Whales

By Alexis Madrigal May 09, 2008 | 11:06:57 AMCategories: Animals, Web/Tech  

 

Regular Wired Science readers know that I have a thing for underwater microphones. Streaming the depths of the ocean to your laptop is just plain awesome. But now scientists are using them to do some good. Researchers at the Cornell Bioacoustics Research Laboratory and Woods Hole Oceanographic Institute have teamed up to use hydrophones to protect endangered whales off the coast of Massachusetts.

Using ten microphones attached by a stretchy data cable to buoys at the surface and special software that picks out the acoustic signature of right whales, the scientists are able to detect the slow-moving marine mammals. When a hydrophone hears a whale, it makes a cell or satellite call to researchers who contact ship captains to tell them to watch out. The map to the right is a near real-time detection map provided to you, at listenforwhales.org. It’s important work as less than 400 right whales survive and run-ins with ships are a leading cause of their death. 4   http://orcasound.net/  

A growing coalition of scientists, educators, and citizens are working together to expand a regional hydrophone network in the Salish Sea. This site is part of the SeaSound Project of The Whale Museum and is an experiment in sharing real-time underwater sound. The goals are to monitor the critical habitat of endangered southern resident killer whales to detect orca sounds and measure ambient noise levels.

Listen live via the links in the table or in the pop-up description you get by clicking the green markers on the map. For some hydrophones you can also watch live video from nearby (by clicking on the camera icons). The other icons show other hydrophones in the region that have not yet been networked. 2009 listening challenge: Help notify researchers when orcas are in the Salish Sea. If you hear killer whales please email detection@orcasound.net or log your observations in a collaborative Google spreadsheet. Use the Salish Sea sound tutor to learn to tell which pod is present based on the calls they use most often. Use web cams and other real-time sensors around the Salish Sea to figure out what else you might be hearing.  http://www.whaleacoustics.com/audio.html Baleen Whales Toothed Whales Dolphins Minke Whale Song Other Ocean Sounds  http://cetus.ucsd.edu/sounds.html The Voices in the Sea website demonstrates the diversity of marine mammals in the world’s oceans and the important role that sound plays in all aspects of their lives. In the website videos, scientists describe their research efforts, show new technologies that are making this work possible, and share the most current insight into the natural history and conservation of these fascinating animals. 

Other marine audio streams listed by http://orcasound.net/

Please let us know of other live streams.

2 thoughts on “Whales Listening and Underwater Sound

  1. I am officially jealous of Peng Joon. This video he’s released is amazing and it’s the reasonI’m jealous, watch this video BUZZBOOZ.COM The good part starts somewhere around the 2 minute mark.

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